Sediment Provenance

Influences on Compositional Change from Source to Sink
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 8. Oktober 2016
  • |
  • 614 Seiten
 
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E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-803387-6 (ISBN)
 

Sediment Provenance: Influences on Compositional Change from Source to Sink provides a thorough and inclusive overview that features data-based case studies on a broad range of dynamic aspects in sedimentary rock structure and deposition. Provenance data plays a critical role in a number of aspects of sedimentary rocks, including the assessment of palaeogeographic reconstructions, the constraints of lateral displacements in orogens, the characterization of crust which is no longer exposed, the mapping of depositional systems, sub-surface correlation, and in predicting reservoir quality.

The provenance of fine-grained sediments-on a global scale-has been used to monitor crustal evolution, and sediment transport is paramount in considering restoration techniques for both watershed and river restoration. Transport is responsible for erosion, bank undercutting, sandbar formation, aggradation, gullying, and plugging, as well as bed form migration and generation of primary sedimentary structures.

Additionally, the quest for reservoir quality in contemporary hydrocarbon exploration and extraction necessitates a deliberate focus on diagenesis. This book addresses all of these challenges and arms geoscientists with an all-in-one reference to sedimentary rocks, from source to deposition.


  • Provides the latest data available on various aspects of sedimentary rocks from their source to deposition
  • Features case studies throughout that illustrate new data and critical analyses of published data by some of the world's most pre-eminent sedimentologists
  • Includes more than 150 illustrations, photos, figures, and diagrams that underscore key concepts
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 22,38 MB
978-0-12-803387-6 (9780128033876)
0128033878 (0128033878)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Sediment Provenance
  • SEDIMENT PROVENANCE: INFLUENCES ON COMPOSITIONAL CHANGE FROM SOURCE TO SINK
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • 1 - Sediment Provenance: Influence on Compositional Change From Source to Sink
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 2 - Evolution of Siliciclastic Provenance Inquiries: A Critical Appraisal
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. PURPOSE AND SCOPE
  • 3. MATERIALS AND RELEVANT PROPERTIES
  • 4. INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES AND INSIGHTFUL RESULTS
  • 4.1 Optical Microscopy
  • 4.2 Chemical Compositions of Bulk Rocks
  • 4.3 Populations of Single Derital Minerals
  • 5. THE CRITIQUE
  • 5.1 Bulk Mineralogical Compositions
  • 5.2 Bulk Chemical Compositions
  • 5.3 Properties of Single Minerals
  • 6. DISCUSSION
  • 7. THE FUTURE
  • 8. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • APPENDIX I. DIVERSE CRITERIA FOR MODAL ANALYSIS OF SANDSTONES
  • 3 - Tracing the Source of the Bio/Siliciclastic Beach Sands at Rosa Marina (Apulian Coast, SE Italy)
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 1.1 Beaches as Multiprocess Environments
  • 1.2 Characteristics of Beach Sands
  • 2. SETTING OF THE STUDY AREA
  • 2.1 Geographical Aspects
  • 2.2 Stratigraphy and Sedimentology
  • 3. METHODS
  • 3.1 Sampling of the Beach Sand
  • 3.2 Petrographical Methods
  • 4. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BEACH SAND AND OLDER UNITS
  • 4.1 Composition of the Beach Sand
  • 4.2 Grain-Size Characteristics of the Beach Sand
  • 4.3 Older Sedimentary Units
  • 4.4 Classification of the Beach Sand
  • 5. MARINE LIFE FORMS CONTRIBUTING TO THE BEACH SAND
  • 5.1 The Main Biocenoses
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 4 - Changes in the Heavy-Mineral Spectra on Their Way From Various Sources to Joint Sinks: A Case Study of Pleistoc ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOGRAPHICAL SETTING
  • 3. METHODS
  • 4. HEAVY-MINERAL SPECTRA
  • 4.1 Northern Sources of the Heavy Minerals
  • 4.2 The IMV Substratum as a Source
  • 4.3 Source Areas in the South
  • 4.4 Postdepositional Processes Affecting the Heavy-Mineral Spectra
  • 4.5 Sorting as an Important Factor Controlling the Heavy-Mineral Spectra
  • 5. DISCUSSION
  • 5.1 Factors Influencing Heavy-Mineral Spectra
  • 5.2 Sources of the Sediments Under Study
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 5 - Reconstructions of Paleohydraulic Conditions From Primary Sedimentary Structures: Problems and Implications for ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. ENTRAINMENT AND TRANSPORTATION
  • 3. BED FORM STABILITY
  • 3.1 Froude Number and the Bed Form Geometry
  • 4. ESTIMATION OF PALEOHYDRAULIC PARAMETERS FROM DIFFERENT STRUCTURES
  • 4.1 Dunes and Ripples
  • 4.2 Cross-Stratification
  • 4.3 Antidune
  • 5. RANDOMNESS OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS
  • 6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 6 - Physico-Chemical Characteristics of the Barremian-Aptian Siliciclastic Rocks in the Pondicherry Embryonic Rift ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL BACKGROUND
  • 3. METHODOLOGY
  • 4. FACIES ANALYSIS
  • 4.1 Facies Association I, Scree Cone
  • 4.1.1 Interpretation
  • 4.2 Facies Association II, Alluvial Fan Apex
  • 4.2.1 Interpretation
  • 4.3 Facies Association III, Alluvial Fan Base
  • 4.3.1 Interpretation
  • 4.4 Facies Association IV, Axial Channel Association
  • 4.4.1 Interpretation
  • 4.5 Facies Association V, Intermediate Flood-Plain Association
  • 4.5.1 Interpretation
  • 4.6 Facies Association VI, Distal Flood-Plain Association
  • 4.6.1 Interpretation
  • 5. SANDSTONE PETROGRAPHY
  • 6. GEOCHEMISTRY
  • 6.1 Results of Major and Trace Element Analysis
  • 6.2 Discussion: Implications of Geochemical and Physical Characteristics for Sediments
  • 6.2.1 Provenance and Tectonic Setting
  • 6.2.2 Comparison With Upper Cratonic Crust Standards
  • 6.2.3 Weathering Intensity
  • 6.2.4 Rainfall and Temperature
  • 6.2.5 Paleogeographic Overprint
  • 7. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 7 - Petrological and Geochemical Constraints on Provenance, Paleoweathering, and Tectonic Setting of Clastic Sedime ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. SEDIMENTOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND TECTONICS
  • 2.1 Sediment Chronology and Depositional Environment
  • 2.2 Tectonics
  • 3. METHODOLOGY
  • 4. RESULTS
  • 4.1 Petrographic Description
  • 4.2 Chemical Composition
  • 4.3 Elemental Variations
  • 4.3.1 Major Oxides
  • 4.3.2 Trace Elements
  • 4.3.3 Rare Earth Elements
  • 5. DISCUSSION
  • 5.1 Statistical Analysis
  • 5.2 Paleoweathering
  • 5.3 Sediment Sorting and Recycling
  • 5.4 Provenance
  • 5.5 Tectonic Setting
  • 5.5.1 Interpreted Tectonic Setting in the Context of Regional Tectonic Development
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 8 - What Are the Origins of V-Shaped (Chevron) Dunes in Madagascar? The Case for Their Deposition by a Holocene Meg ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. BACKGROUND
  • 3. SAMPLE SELECTION AND PROCESSING
  • 4. SEDIMENTARY CHARACTERISTICS OF CHEVRON SANDS
  • 5. CHARACTERISTICS OF INDIVIDUAL CHEVRONS
  • 5.1 Fenambosy Chevron
  • 6. AMPALAZA CHEVRON
  • 7. DISCUSSION OF MADAGASCAR CHEVRONS
  • 8. GEOCHRONOLOGY
  • 9. ORIGIN OF THE MADAGASCAR CHEVRONS INVESTIGATED HERE
  • 10. OTHER MODERN TSUNAMI DEPOSITS: MIXTURES OF CARBONATE-RICH SAND AND LARGE ROCKS
  • 11. SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER WORK
  • APPENDIX 8.1: WEIGHT PERCENTAGE DATA OF DIFFERENT GRAIN SIZES USED TO CALCULATE GRAIN SIZE PARAMETERS IN TABLE 8.2
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 9 - The Contourite Problem
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 1.1 Contourite Research
  • 1.2 Description of the Problem
  • 2. GLOBAL THERMOHALINE CIRCULATION
  • 3. DEEP-WATER BOTTOM CURRENTS
  • 3.1 Thermohaline-Driven Geostrophic Contour Currents
  • 3.2 Wind-Driven Bottom Currents
  • 3.3 Tide-Driven Bottom Currents
  • 3.4 Internal Wave- and Tide-Driven Baroclinic Currents
  • 4. FUNDAMENTAL CONTOURITE PROBLEMS
  • 4.1 Dual Forcing of Global Ocean Circulation
  • 4.2 Continuum Between Turbidity Currents and Contour Currents
  • 4.3 Revision of the Basic Principle of Contour Currents
  • 4.4 Hiatuses in Contourites
  • 4.5 Origin of Erosional Features
  • 4.6 Gulf of Cadiz as the Type Locality
  • 4.6.1 Channel-Current Stage
  • 4.6.2 Mixing and Spreading Stage
  • 4.6.3 Contour-Current Stage
  • 4.7 The Contourite Facies Model
  • 4.7.1 Five Internal Divisions
  • 4.7.2 Current Velocities
  • 4.7.3 Internal Hiatuses
  • 4.7.4 Bioturbation
  • 4.7.5 Multiple Interactive Processes
  • 4.8 Grain-Size Data and Related Issues
  • 4.9 Traction Structures and Shale Clasts
  • 4.10 Bedform-Velocity Matrix
  • 4.11 Seismic Profiles, Sonar Images, and Submarine Photographs
  • 4.12 Oceanic Waves
  • 4.12.1 Internal Waves and Tides
  • 4.12.2 Cyclonic Waves
  • 4.12.3 Tsunami Waves
  • 4.13 Reservoir Quality
  • 4.14 Sediment Provenance
  • 4.14.1 Current Directions
  • 4.14.2 Detrital Composition
  • 4.15 Abyssal Plain Contourites
  • 5. CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 10 - Fluvial Systems, Provenance, and Reservoir Development in the Eocene Brennan Basin Member of the Duchesne Rive ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL CONTEXT
  • 3. REGIONAL SEDIMENTARY FACIES OF THE BRENNAN BASIN MEMBER
  • 4. METHOD
  • 5. SANDSTONE COMPOSITION AND PALEOCURRENTS
  • 6. PETROGRAPHY
  • 7. SYNTHESIS OF PALEODRAINAGE MODEL
  • 8. DISCUSSION
  • 9. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 11 - Changes in the Shape of Breccia Lenses Sliding From Source to Sink in the Cambrian Epeiric Sea of the North Ch ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL SETTING
  • 3. THE BRECCIA LENSES
  • 3.1 Shapes and Characteristics of the Lenses
  • 3.1.1 Lens 1
  • 3.1.2 Lens 2
  • 3.1.3 Lens 3
  • 3.1.4 Lens 4
  • 3.1.5 Lens 5
  • 3.2 Shapes and Characteristics of the Tails
  • 3.3 Shapes and Characteristics of the Shear Planes
  • 4. GENETIC INTERPRETATION OF THE LENSES AND THEIR SHAPES
  • 5. CHANGE OF SHAPE DURING AND AFTER SLIDING
  • 5.1 Postdepositional Changes in Architecture
  • 5.1.1 Shaping of the Upper Surface
  • 5.1.2 Formation and Shaping of the Tails
  • 5.2 Changes in Shape During Sliding
  • 5.2.1 Formation of the Breccia Level Under the Lenses
  • 5.2.2 The Tear Shape of the Frontal Part
  • 6. DISCUSSION
  • 6.1 Possible Other Genetic Mechanisms
  • 6.2 Required Inclination of the Slide Plane
  • 6.3 Fragmentation of the Breccia Layer
  • 6.4 Source Area
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 12 - Provenance of Chert Rudites and Arenites in the Northern Canadian Cordillera
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. LITHOLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY
  • 3. PETROGRAPHY
  • 3.1 Conglomerates
  • 3.2 Sandstones
  • 4. ZIRCON GEOCHRONOLOGY
  • 5. INTERPRETATION
  • 5.1 Detrital Provenance
  • 5.1.1 Quartz
  • 5.1.2 Feldspar
  • 5.1.3 Nonchert Lithic Grains
  • 5.1.4 Chert
  • 5.2 Zircon Provenance
  • 6. DISCUSSION
  • 7. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 13 - Late Neoproterozoic to Early Mesozoic Sedimentary Rocks of the Tasmanides, Eastern Australia: Provenance Switc ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL SETTING AND SUBDIVISIONS OF THE TASMANIDES
  • 3. PROVENANCE
  • 3.1 Influx of Pacific-Gondwana Sediment
  • 3.2 Ordovician Turbidites and Macquarie Arc in the Lachlan Orogen
  • 3.3 Silurian-Devonian Foreland Successions in the Western and Southern Lachlan Orogen
  • 3.4 Provenance of New England Orogen Sandstones and Conglomerates and Provenance Switching in Subduction Complex Sandstones of ...
  • 3.5 Local Derivation in the Northern Tasmanides (Mossman Orogen)
  • 3.6 Orogenic and Cratonic Sources in the Permian-Triassic Sydney Basin
  • 4. DISCUSSION
  • 4.1 Sources of Sedimentary Rocks in the Tasmanides
  • 4.2 Tectonic Setting and Provenance Switching
  • 4.3 Exotic Terranes in the Tasmanides
  • 5. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 14 - Utility of Detrital Zircon Grains From Upper Amphibolite Facies Rocks of the Grenville Supergroup, Adirondack ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL SETTING
  • 3. ANALYTICAL METHODS
  • 4. RESULTS
  • 4.1 Pyrites (PQ: Quartz-Rich Layers in Pyritic Turbidities)
  • 4.2 Richville (RQ: Tourmaline-Bearing Feldspathic Quartzite/Arkose in Lower Marble)
  • 4.3 Popple Hill Gneiss (OB: Sandy, Rusty, Calc-Silicate Interlayer)
  • 4.4 Popple Hill Gneiss/Upper Marble (UM: Glassy Quartzite at Lithologic Contact)
  • 4.5 Upper Marble (BS: Unit 4: Balmat Stromatolitic Calc-Silicate Rock)
  • 4.6 Upper Marble (MG: Unit 16: Layered Leucogranitic Gneiss)
  • 5. DISCUSSION
  • 5.1 Age of the Grenville Supergroup in Adirondack Lowlands
  • 5.2 Provenance
  • 5.2.1 Rift
  • 5.2.2 Drift
  • 5.2.3 Foredeep
  • 5.2.4 Transitional Period
  • 5.2.5 Basin Closure
  • 5.3 Use of Zircon in High-Grade Terranes
  • 5.4 Paleogeographic Constraints
  • 5.5 Constraints on the Zinc Ore at Balmat
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 15 - Detrital Zircon U-Pb Geochronology, Nd Isotope Mapping, and Sediment Geochemistry From the Singhora Group, Cen ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGICAL AND GEOCHRONOLOGICAL BACKGROUND
  • 3. SAMPLE DESCRIPTION
  • 4. ANALYTICAL METHOD
  • 5. RESULTS
  • 5.1 Bulk Rock Geochemistry of Studied Lithounits
  • 5.2 Nd-Isotope Mapping
  • 5.3 U-Pb Zircon Geochronology
  • 5.3.1 Samples From the Singhora Basin
  • 5.3.1.1 BASEMENT GNEISS (SAMPLE NO-L21/09)
  • 5.3.1.2 REHTIKHOL FORMATION (SAMPLE NO-L4/09 AND K-15)
  • 5.3.1.3 SARAIPALLI FORMATION (SAMPLE NO-4/L1)
  • 5.3.1.4 BHALUKONA FORMATION (SAMPLE NO-L18/09, BH-10)
  • 5.3.2 Sandstones From the Chandarpur Group, Chhattisgarh Main Basin, and the Khariar Group, Khariar Basin
  • 5.3.2.1 CHANDARPUR SANDSTONE (SAMPLE NO-L3/09)
  • 5.3.2.2 KHARIAR SANDSTONE (BASAL SANDSTONE OF KHARIAR GROUP, SAMPLE NO-14/L5)
  • 6. DISCORDANCE IN U-PB ISOTOPIC VALUES
  • 7. DISCUSSION
  • 7.1 Provenance and Its Change Through Time
  • 7.2 Timing of Singhora Sedimentation
  • 7.3 Regional Correlation
  • 8. CONCLUSION
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 16 - Deciphering Sedimentary Provenance and Timing of Sedimentation From a Suite of Metapelites From the Chotanagpu ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. REGIONAL GEOLOGY
  • 3. SAMPLE DESCRIPTION
  • 3.1 AS79 (24°23.427´, 87°10.192´)
  • 3.2 AS27 (24°24.510´, 86°57.179´)
  • 3.3 AS17 (24°26.426´, 86°57.580´)
  • 4. ANALYTICAL METHODS, ZIRCON MORPHOLOGY, AND RESULTS
  • 4.1 Analytical Methods for Zircon U-Pb Geochronology
  • 4.2 Zircon Morphology and Results
  • 4.2.1 AS79
  • 4.2.2 AS27
  • 4.2.3 AS17
  • 5. DISCUSSION
  • 5.1 Age of the Sediment Deposition
  • 5.2 Provenance Interpretations and Potential Sediment Source Areas
  • 5.3 Tectonic Significance of the Paleoproterozoic Sedimentary Basins of India
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 17 - SEM-CL Fabric Analysis of Quartz Framework Population From the Mesoarchean Keonjhar Quartzite From Singhbhum C ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGIC BACKGROUND
  • 3. MATERIALS AND METHODS
  • 4. RESULTS
  • 4.1 Petrography
  • 4.1.1 QtFLt Tectonic Discrimination Diagram
  • 4.1.2 Qm-F-Lt Tectonic Discrimination Diagram
  • 4.1.3 Qm-P-K Tectonic Discrimination Diagram
  • 4.2 Scanning Electron Microscope and Cathodoluminescence Analysis
  • 4.2.1 Type A
  • 4.2.2 Type B
  • 4.2.3 Type C
  • 4.2.4 Type D
  • 4.2.5 Type E
  • 5. DISCUSSION
  • 5.1 Quartz Genetic Types
  • 5.2 Statistical Significance of the Determination of Quartz Source
  • 5.3 Source and Tectonic Distribution
  • 5.4 SEM-CL Study of Quartz Framework and Implications for the Mesoarchean Upper Crust
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • APPENDICES
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Sign test
  • Wilcoxon signed-rank test
  • 18 - Provenance of Detrital Pyrite in Archean Sedimentary Rocks: Examples From the Witwatersrand Basin
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. PROVENANCE OF DETRITAL PYRITE
  • 2.1 Sedimentary Pyrite Formation
  • 2.2 Pyrite in Igneous Rocks
  • 2.3 Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide and Sedimentary Exhalative Deposits
  • 2.4 Magmatic-Hydrothermal or Metamorphism-Related Hydrothermal Sulfide Deposits
  • 3. STABILITY OF DETRITAL PYRITE AND ITS PRESERVATION POTENTIAL
  • 4. TOOLS TO STUDY DETRITAL PYRITE IN SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
  • 4.1 Sample Preparation
  • 4.2 Mineralogical Characterization
  • 4.3 Trace Elements
  • 4.4 Stable Isotope Analysis
  • 4.5 Radiogenic Isotope Analysis
  • 5. CASE STUDY: THE WITWATERSRAND BASIN
  • 5.1 Setting
  • 5.2 Detrital Pyrite Types
  • 5.3 Pyrite Provenance
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 19 - Ice Ages in Earth History: Puzzling Paleolatitudes and Regional Provenance of Ice Sheets on an Evolving Planet
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. DIAGNOSTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF GLACIAL DEPOSITS
  • 3. CHANGES BETWEEN SOURCE AND SINK
  • 4. GLACIATIONS AND CONTINENTAL DRIFT
  • 5. PALEOMAGNETIC PUZZLES
  • 6. UNUSUAL ROCK ASSOCIATIONS
  • 7. THE CRYOGENIAN CONUNDRUM
  • 7.1 Cryogenian Global Sources and Sinks
  • 7.2 Challenging the Snowball Earth
  • 8. THE BARREN OR BORING BILLION
  • 9. EARLY PROTEROZOIC GLACIATIONS: THE HURONIAN GLACIAL EVENT
  • 9.1 North America and NW Europe
  • 9.2 The Gondwanan Continents
  • 9.2.1 South Africa
  • 9.2.2 Western Australia
  • 9.2.3 India
  • 9.2.4 Summary of Paleoproterozoic Glacial Occurrences
  • 10. ARCHEAN GLACIAL DEPOSITS
  • 11. WHY DID SPORADIC GLACIATIONS OCCUR?
  • 12. SNOWBALL EARTH VERSUS HIGH OBLIQUITY
  • 13. GLACIATIONS, IMPACTS, AND HIGHER LIFE FORMS
  • 14. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 20 - The Isua Supracrustal Belt of the North Atlantic Craton (Greenland): Spotlight on Sedimentary Systems With the ...
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. GEOLOGY OF THE ISUA SUPRACRUSTAL BELT
  • 3. ~3800MA METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS
  • 3.1 Intrabasalt Cherts
  • 3.2 Dolostones, Cherts, and Detrital Sandstones
  • 3.3 ~3800Ma Felsic Conglomerates
  • 4. ~3750MA DIVIDING SEDIMENTARY UNIT
  • 4.1 Relationship with ~3800 and ~3700Ma Assemblages
  • 4.2 Time of Deposition
  • 4.3 Lithological Character
  • 5. ~3710MA CLASTIC AND 3700-3695MA CHEMICAL SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
  • 5.1 Tectonic Setting and Strain Partitioning
  • 5.2 ~3710Ma Felsic Volcano-Sedimentary Rocks and Mafic Pelites
  • 5.3 Setting of Sedimentary Rocks in the Central Tectonic Domain
  • 5.4 Round Pebble Conglomerate: Unconformity and Overlying Dolomitic Rocks
  • 5.5 Depositional Structures in ~3700Ma Banded Iron Formations, Dolomitic and Quartz-Rich Sedimentary Rocks of the Central Tecto ...
  • 6. ISUA DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS
  • 6.1 Depositional Environment of ~3800Ma Sedimentary Rocks
  • 6.2 Depositional Environment of ~3750Ma Sedimentary Rocks
  • 6.3 Depositional Environments of ~3700Ma Sedimentary Rocks
  • 6.4 Samples of Complex Eoarchean Arc Systems
  • 6.5 Climate Control
  • 7. CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Z
  • Back Cover

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