Advances in Clinical Chemistry

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 4. Oktober 2016
  • |
  • 288 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804837-5 (ISBN)
 

Advances in Clinical Chemistry, Volume 77, the latest installment in this internationally acclaimed series, contains chapters authored by world-renowned clinical laboratory scientists, physicians, and research scientists. The serial discusses the latest and most up-to-date technologies related to the field of clinical chemistry and is the benchmark for novel analytical approaches in the clinical laboratory.


  • Provides the most up-to-date technologies in Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Laboratory Science
  • Authored by world renowned clinical laboratory scientists, physicians, and research scientist
  • Presents the international benchmark for novel analytical approaches in the clinical laboratory
0065-2423
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 6,20 MB
978-0-12-804837-5 (9780128048375)
0128048379 (0128048379)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Advances in Clinical Chemistry
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Overview of Laboratory Testing and Clinical Presentations of Complement Deficiencies and Dysregulation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. An Overview of the Complement System
  • 2.1. The Classical Pathway
  • 2.2. The Lectin Pathway
  • 2.3. The Alternative Pathway
  • 2.4. Terminal Pathway and the Terminal Complement Complex
  • 2.5. Mechanisms of Host Cell Protection and Complement Regulation
  • 3. Theoretical Aspects of Laboratory Evaluation of Complement
  • 3.1. Serologic Complement Assays
  • 3.1.1. Measurement of Complement Function or Activity
  • 3.1.2. Measurement of Complement Factors Concentrations
  • 3.1.3. Measurement of Complement Activation Products
  • 3.1.4. Measurement of Autoantibodies to Complement Factors
  • 3.2. Complement Genetic Testing
  • 4. Conditions Associated with Complement Deficiency or Dysregulation
  • 4.1. Hereditary and Acquired Angioedema
  • 4.1.1. Clinical Presentation
  • 4.1.2. Laboratory Testing for HAE and AAE
  • 4.2. Complement Deficiencies
  • 4.2.1. Clinical Presentation
  • 4.2.2. Laboratory Testing for Complement Deficiencies
  • 4.3. Complement in Autoimmune Diseases
  • 4.3.1. Disease Presentations
  • 4.3.2. Laboratory Testing for Complement in Autoimmune Diseases
  • 4.4. Complement in Monoclonal Gammopathies and Cryoglobulinemia
  • 4.4.1. Complement Activation in Monoclonal Gammopathies
  • 4.4.2. Relationship Between Mixed Cryoglobulinemia and Complement
  • 4.4.3. Complement Abnormalities in Hepatitis C Virus Infections
  • 4.4.4. Complement Testing for Monoclonal Gammopathies, Cryoglobulinemia, and Chronic Infections
  • 4.5. Complement in C3 Glomerulopathies
  • 4.5.1. Clinical Presentation
  • 4.5.2. Laboratory Testing for Immune Complex-Mediated MPGN and C3G
  • 4.6. Complement in Age-Related Macular Degeneration
  • 4.6.1. Disease Presentation
  • 4.6.2. Laboratory Testing for AMD
  • 4.7. Complement in aHUS
  • 4.7.1. Clinical Presentation
  • 4.7.2. aHUS Laboratory Testing
  • 4.8. Complement in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria
  • 4.8.1. Clinical Presentation
  • 4.8.2. Laboratory Testing for PNH
  • 5. Complement Therapeutics
  • 5.1. Therapeutics for HAE
  • 5.2. The C5 Inhibitor
  • 5.3. Monitoring Efficacy of the C5 Complement Inhibitor in the Laboratory
  • 5.4. Complement Therapeutics on the Horizon
  • 6. Considerations and Recommendations for Laboratory Testing
  • 6.1. Sample Stability and Preanalytical Considerations
  • 6.2. Postanalytical Challenges
  • 7. Concluding Remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Autoimmunity in Crohn´s Disease-A Putative Stratification Factor of the Clinical Phenotype
  • 1. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
  • 2. The Impact of Autoimmunity in CD
  • 3. Discovery of Autoantigenic Targets in CD
  • 3.1. GP2 as an Autoantigenic Target in CD
  • 3.2. CUZD1 as an Autoantigenic Target in CD
  • 4. AutoAbs to GP2 and CUZD1 in the Serology of IBD
  • 5. Association of Autoimmunity with the Phenotype in CD
  • 6. Anti-GP2 and Pathophysiology
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Monitoring Oxygen Status
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Parameters in Oxygen Monitoring
  • 2.1. Pulse Oximetry
  • 2.2. Point of Care Testing for Blood Gases
  • 2.3. Transcutaneous Monitoring
  • 3. Structure and Function of Hemoglobin
  • 4. Processes in Oxygen Transport from Lungs to Mitochondria
  • 5. Oxygen Measurements and Methodology
  • 5.1. pO2
  • 5.2. Total Hb, %O2Hb (and sO2), CO-Hb, Met-Hb, and HHb
  • 6. Proper Collection and Transport of Blood for Oxygen Measurements
  • 6.1. Delay in Sample Processing
  • 6.2. Storage Time of Specimens After Collection: Room Temperature vs Icing
  • 6.3. Insufficient Line Waste Draw
  • 6.4. Inadequate Mixing of Heparinized Blood
  • 6.5. Dilution by Liquid Heparin
  • 6.6. Trapped Air in Syringes
  • 6.7. Pneumatic Transport of Specimens
  • 6.8. Collection of Capillary Samples
  • 7. Calculated Oxygen Parameters Used Clinically
  • 7.1. Alveolar-Arterial pO2 Gradient
  • 7.2. pO2:FIO2 Ratio
  • 7.3. Oxygenation Index
  • 7.4. O2 Content
  • 7.5. O2 Delivery
  • 8. Causes of Hypoxemia [19]
  • 8.1. Low FIO2
  • 8.2. Hypoventilation
  • 8.3. V/Q Mismatch
  • 8.4. Intrapulmonary Shunting
  • 8.5. Diffusion Impairment
  • 9. Physiologic Parameters Calculated
  • 9.1. Pulmonary Dead Space
  • 9.2. Intrapulmonary Shunting
  • 10. Clinical Applications
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Microvesicles in Autoimmune Diseases
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Overview of Microvesicles
  • 2.1. Definition and Characteristics of Microvesicles
  • 2.2. Formation of Cellular Microvesicles
  • 2.3. Interactions Between Microvesicles and Target Cells
  • 2.4. Clearance of Cellular Microvesicles
  • 2.5. Detection of Microvesicles
  • 3. Pathology of Microvesicles in Autoimmune Disease
  • 3.1. Microvesicles and Autoimmunity
  • 3.2. Microvesicles and Autoimmune Inflammation
  • 3.3. Microvesicles and Procoagulation or Thrombosis
  • 3.4. Microvesicles and Vascular Inflammation
  • 3.5. Microvesicles and Endothelial Dysfunction
  • 3.6. Microvesicles and Angiogenesis
  • 3.7. Microvesicles as Carriers of RNA (mRNA, siRNA, miRNA, lncRNA) and DNA
  • 4. Conclusion and Future Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Sphingolipids: Applications for Diagnosis of Sphingolipidoses
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Structure and Function of SL
  • 2.1. Biosynthesis of SL
  • 2.2. Degradation of SL
  • 2.3. Lysosomal Storage Disorders
  • 3. Mass Spectrometry of Sphingolipids
  • 3.1. Theoretical Background
  • 3.1.1. Electrospray Ionization
  • 3.1.2. LC Coupled to ESI-MS/MS
  • 3.1.3. MALDI
  • 3.1.4. MS/MS: With Low-Resolution Analyzers
  • 3.1.5. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry
  • 3.1.6. MS: Limits and Progress in the Field
  • 3.2. Sample Preparation: Lipid Extraction
  • 3.3. Quantitative Analysis of Lipids
  • 4. Sphingolipidomics and LSD Diagnosis
  • 4.1. Primary Stored Sphingolipid Substrates
  • 4.2. Deacylated SL and Their Analogs
  • 4.3. Secondarily Altered Metabolites
  • 4.4. Enzymology
  • 4.5. Metabolic Experiments in Living Cells
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Advances in Blood Typing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Blood Group Antigens
  • 1.2. Antibodies to Blood Group Antigens
  • 1.3. The Red Cell Phenotype
  • 2. The Major Blood Group Antigens
  • 2.1. Molecular Basis of Blood Groups
  • 2.2. ABO Blood Group System
  • 2.3. Rh Blood Group System
  • 2.3.1. RhD Protein (D Protein)
  • 2.3.2. RhCE Proteins
  • 2.4. Other Major Blood Group Systems
  • 2.4.1. Kell Blood Group System
  • 2.4.2. Kidd Blood Group System
  • 2.4.3. Duffy Blood Group System
  • 2.4.4. MNS Blood Group System
  • 3. Serological Typing Methods
  • 3.1. Overview of Serological Typing Methods
  • 3.1.1. Tube Typing
  • 3.1.2. Gel Typing
  • 3.1.3. Microplate Typing
  • 3.1.4. Slide Typing
  • 3.1.5. Other Methods
  • 3.2. Test Modifications for Serological Typing
  • 4. Common Indications for Red Cell Phenotype Testing
  • 4.1. Blood Donor Testing
  • 4.2. Pretransfusion Testing
  • 4.3. Prenatal Testing
  • 4.4. Drawbacks of Serological Typing
  • 5. Molecular Typing Methods
  • 5.1. Overview of Molecular Typing Methods
  • 5.2. Applications of Molecular Typing
  • 5.2.1. Blood Donor Testing
  • 5.2.1.1. Mass Screening
  • 5.2.1.2. Antigens with No Typing Antisera
  • 5.2.1.3. Weak Antigens
  • 5.2.1.4. Variant Alleles
  • 5.2.2. Pretransfusion Testing
  • 5.2.2.1. Serological Typing Not Possible
  • 5.2.2.2. Serological Typing Not Sufficient
  • 5.2.2.3. Weak D and Partial D
  • 5.2.2.4. Other Variant Alleles
  • 5.2.2.5. Sickle Cell Anemia
  • 5.2.3. Prenatal Testing
  • 5.2.3.1. Paternal Zygosity Testing
  • 5.2.3.2. Fetal Testing
  • 5.3. Drawbacks of Molecular Typing
  • 6. Case Studies
  • 6.1. ABO Typing Discrepancy
  • 6.2. Interfering Reactivity in Plasma Sample
  • 6.3. Antigen-Positive Patient with Antibody-1
  • 6.4. Antigen-Positive Patient with Antibody-2
  • 6.5. Sickle Cell Anemia
  • 6.6. Rh-Positive or Rh-Negative?
  • 6.7. Maternal Antibody
  • 6.8. Blood Donor Screening
  • 7. Future Prospects
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

174,93 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok