Strategic Social Media

From Marketing to Social Change
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 12. September 2016
  • |
  • 360 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-55694-8 (ISBN)
 
Strategic Social Media is the first textbook to go beyond the marketing plans and how-to guides, and provide an overview of the theories, action plans, and case studies necessary for teaching students and readers about utilizing social media to meet marketing goals.
* Explores the best marketing practices for reaching business goals, while also providing strategies that students/readers can apply to any past, present or future social media platform
* Provides comprehensive treatment of social media in five distinct sections: landscape, messages, marketing and business models, social change, and the future
* Emphasizes social responsibility and ethics, and how this relates to capitalizing on market share
* Highlights marketing strategies grounded in research that explains how practitioners can influence audience behaviour
* Each chapter introduces theory, practice, action plans, and case studies to teach students the power and positive possibilities that social media hold
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
L. Meghan Mahoney is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She regularly publishes research on issues related to new media audiences, social media, and marketing messages for behaviour and social change, most recently in the Journal of Media Education, Journal of Intercultural Communication, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Journal of Development Communication, and theJournal of Media and Communication Studies. She currently serves as Chair of the Management, Marketing & Programming Division of the Broadcast Education Association, and Social Media Coordinator for the Eastern Communication Association.Tang Tang is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the School of Communication at The University of Akron. She has published articles in the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, International Journal on Media Management, Mass Communication & Society, Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, and Journal of Sports Media. She is a Faculty Fellow of the National Association of Television Program Executives, and has held leadership positions in the Broadcast Education Association and the International Communication Association.
1 - Strategic Social Media [Seite 3]
2 - Contents [Seite 7]
3 - Introduction [Seite 13]
3.1 - Reference [Seite 15]
4 - Part 1 Social Media in Convergence [Seite 17]
4.1 - 1 Understanding Social Media and Social Behavior Change [Seite 19]
4.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 19]
4.1.2 - Bridging Communication Theories and Social Media Practitioners [Seite 22]
4.1.3 - Linear Communication Models to Modern Transactional Processes [Seite 22]
4.1.4 - Marketing and Behavior Change Theory [Seite 25]
4.1.5 - Case Study: Warby Parker [Seite 30]
4.1.6 - Summary [Seite 32]
4.1.7 - References [Seite 33]
4.2 - 2 Information Diffusion [Seite 35]
4.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 35]
4.2.2 - Diffusing Your Message [Seite 36]
4.2.3 - Web 1.0 to 2.0 Technology Structure [Seite 38]
4.2.3.1 - Social media [Seite 38]
4.2.3.2 - Mass media [Seite 39]
4.2.3.3 - Shift to Web 2.0 [Seite 40]
4.2.4 - Transparency, Control and Public Relations [Seite 41]
4.2.4.1 - Create additional transparency [Seite 42]
4.2.4.2 - Transparency of your product [Seite 45]
4.2.4.3 - Planned and perceived obsolescence [Seite 46]
4.2.4.4 - Additional elements of brand transparency [Seite 47]
4.2.5 - Case Study: Shell Arctic Ready [Seite 50]
4.2.6 - Summary [Seite 52]
4.2.7 - References [Seite 53]
4.3 - 3 Establishing Community [Seite 56]
4.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 56]
4.3.2 - Community Development Theory [Seite 57]
4.3.3 - Behavior Change and the Power of Social Networks [Seite 62]
4.3.4 - Brand Authenticity [Seite 64]
4.3.5 - Case Study: Grey Poupon [Seite 67]
4.3.6 - Summary [Seite 69]
4.3.7 - References [Seite 71]
4.4 - 4 Mobilizing Your Audience [Seite 73]
4.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 73]
4.4.2 - Social Media Mobilization [Seite 74]
4.4.3 - The Power of User-Generated Content [Seite 77]
4.4.4 - Offline Advocacy [Seite 80]
4.4.5 - Case Study: Breast Cancer Meme [Seite 83]
4.4.6 - Summary [Seite 86]
4.4.7 - References [Seite 87]
5 - Part 2 Social Media Users and Messages [Seite 91]
5.1 - 5 Transforming Audiences into Users [Seite 93]
5.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 93]
5.1.2 - Transforming Passive Audiences to Empowered Users [Seite 94]
5.1.2.1 - Uses and gratifications theory [Seite 95]
5.1.2.2 - Social cognitive theory [Seite 95]
5.1.2.3 - Mood management theory [Seite 96]
5.1.2.4 - Selective exposure theory [Seite 97]
5.1.3 - Predicting Social Media Use and Audience Behavior [Seite 98]
5.1.4 - Social Media User Profile [Seite 102]
5.1.5 - Case Study: Weixin [Seite 104]
5.1.6 - Summary [Seite 106]
5.1.7 - References [Seite 108]
5.2 - 6 Active Within Structures [Seite 111]
5.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 111]
5.2.2 - Theory of Active Within Structures [Seite 112]
5.2.3 - The Role of Structure [Seite 115]
5.2.3.1 - Search [Seite 116]
5.2.3.2 - User profiles [Seite 116]
5.2.3.3 - Recommendation [Seite 117]
5.2.3.4 - Messaging/chat [Seite 118]
5.2.3.5 - Hyperlink [Seite 118]
5.2.3.6 - Catalog of content [Seite 119]
5.2.3.7 - Connection to groups/people [Seite 119]
5.2.4 - Recognizing Constrained Active Choices [Seite 119]
5.2.5 - Case Study: NBCs Social Olympics [Seite 120]
5.2.6 - Summary [Seite 124]
5.2.7 - References [Seite 125]
5.3 - 7 Best Practices for Social Media Engagement [Seite 127]
5.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 127]
5.3.2 - The Theory of Dialogic Communication [Seite 128]
5.3.3 - Online Engagement and Virtual Communities [Seite 130]
5.3.4 - The Dialogic Loop [Seite 135]
5.3.5 - Case Study: Second Life [Seite 137]
5.3.6 - Summary [Seite 139]
5.3.7 - References [Seite 140]
5.4 - 8 Mobile Marketing and Location-based Applications [Seite 142]
5.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 142]
5.4.2 - Mobile Digital Projections [Seite 144]
5.4.3 - Peer Influence and a Shared Social Journey [Seite 147]
5.4.4 - Generating Return Visits [Seite 149]
5.4.5 - Case Study: Renren [Seite 151]
5.4.6 - Summary [Seite 152]
5.4.7 - References [Seite 154]
6 - Part 3 Social Media Marketing and Business Models [Seite 157]
6.1 - 9 Reconsidering the Long Tail [Seite 159]
6.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 159]
6.1.2 - Power-Law Distribution [Seite 160]
6.1.3 - Theory of the Long Tail [Seite 161]
6.1.4 - Inbound Marketing [Seite 164]
6.1.4.1 - Spreadability of media content [Seite 165]
6.1.4.2 - Content blogging [Seite 166]
6.1.4.3 - Brand collaboration [Seite 166]
6.1.4.4 - Search engine optimization [Seite 166]
6.1.4.5 - Questioning the long tail [Seite 167]
6.1.5 - Case Study: Video on Demand [Seite 168]
6.1.6 - Summary [Seite 170]
6.1.7 - References [Seite 171]
6.2 - 10 Social Media Business Models [Seite 173]
6.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 173]
6.2.2 - Developing a Business Model [Seite 174]
6.2.2.1 - Value proposition [Seite 175]
6.2.2.2 - Customer segmentation [Seite 176]
6.2.2.3 - Competitive strategy [Seite 177]
6.2.2.4 - Marketing strategy [Seite 177]
6.2.2.5 - Revenue stream [Seite 178]
6.2.2.6 - Cost structure [Seite 178]
6.2.2.7 - Organizational development [Seite 179]
6.2.3 - Developing a Business Model Action Plan [Seite 179]
6.2.4 - The Return on Investment of Social Media [Seite 179]
6.2.5 - One Business Model Doesnt Fit All [Seite 184]
6.2.6 - Case Study: Xing [Seite 186]
6.2.7 - Summary [Seite 187]
6.2.8 - References [Seite 188]
6.3 - 11 Social Media Marketing Strategies [Seite 192]
6.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 192]
6.3.2 - Transitioning from Traditional Marketing [Seite 193]
6.3.3 - Applied Strategic Theory [Seite 195]
6.3.3.1 - Goals [Seite 195]
6.3.3.2 - Target audience [Seite 196]
6.3.3.3 - Social media choice [Seite 196]
6.3.3.4 - Resources [Seite 197]
6.3.3.5 - Policies [Seite 198]
6.3.3.6 - Monitoring [Seite 198]
6.3.3.7 - Activity plan [Seite 198]
6.3.4 - Branded Social Experience [Seite 201]
6.3.5 - Case Study: Orkut [Seite 204]
6.3.6 - Summary [Seite 205]
6.3.7 - References [Seite 206]
6.4 - 12 Evaluating Social Media Marketing [Seite 208]
6.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 208]
6.4.2 - Current Social Media Marketing Measurements [Seite 209]
6.4.3 - Building on the Focus Group [Seite 212]
6.4.4 - Audience Reception Approach [Seite 213]
6.4.5 - Case Study: @WalmartLabs [Seite 216]
6.4.6 - Summary [Seite 218]
6.4.7 - References [Seite 220]
7 - Part 4 Marketing for Social Good [Seite 223]
7.1 - 13 Social Media and Health Campaigns [Seite 225]
7.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 225]
7.1.2 - Activation Theory of Information Exposure [Seite 227]
7.1.3 - Health Belief Model [Seite 230]
7.1.4 - Mobile Reach [Seite 234]
7.1.5 - Case Study: Diabetes: A Family Matter [Seite 236]
7.1.6 - Summary [Seite 238]
7.1.7 - References [Seite 240]
7.2 - 14 Social Media and Civic Engagement [Seite 242]
7.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 242]
7.2.2 - Historical Shifts of Civic Engagement [Seite 244]
7.2.3 - Civic Engagement and the Individual Self [Seite 247]
7.2.4 - Technology and Political Communication [Seite 250]
7.2.5 - Case Study: Kony 2012 [Seite 253]
7.2.6 - Summary [Seite 255]
7.2.7 - References [Seite 256]
7.3 - 15 Communication for Development [Seite 259]
7.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 259]
7.3.2 - Introduction to Communication for Development [Seite 260]
7.3.3 - Modernization, Dependency and Participatory Approaches to Behavior Change [Seite 262]
7.3.4 - Opportunities and Challenges of Communication for Development Approaches [Seite 266]
7.3.5 - Case Study: WITNESS [Seite 271]
7.3.6 - Summary [Seite 272]
7.3.7 - References [Seite 273]
7.4 - 16 Social Media and Entertainment-Education [Seite 276]
7.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 276]
7.4.2 - Theoretical Underpinnings of Entertainment-Education [Seite 278]
7.4.3 - Entertainment-Education and Public Health [Seite 280]
7.4.4 - MARCH Model of Behavior Change [Seite 281]
7.4.5 - Case Study: Makgabaneng [Seite 286]
7.4.6 - Summary [Seite 288]
7.4.7 - References [Seite 289]
8 - Part 5 Social Media for Social and Behavior Change [Seite 291]
8.1 - 17 Integrating Old with New [Seite 293]
8.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 293]
8.1.2 - The Culture of Convergence [Seite 294]
8.1.2.1 - Convergence culture [Seite 296]
8.1.3 - Remediation Theory [Seite 298]
8.1.4 - Integrating Social Media in a Post-Convergence Era [Seite 299]
8.1.5 - Case Study: ABCs Rising Star [Seite 302]
8.1.6 - Summary [Seite 304]
8.1.7 - References [Seite 306]
8.2 - 18 Social Media for Social Behavior Change [Seite 309]
8.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 309]
8.2.2 - We First [Seite 310]
8.2.3 - Role of the User [Seite 313]
8.2.4 - Identification through Social Behavior [Seite 316]
8.2.5 - Case Study: Global Reporting Initiative [Seite 318]
8.2.6 - Summary [Seite 320]
8.2.7 - References [Seite 322]
8.3 - 19 Arguing for a General Framework for Social Media Scholarship [Seite 324]
8.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 324]
8.3.2 - The Six Paradigms of Communication Theory [Seite 325]
8.3.2.1 - Social psychological theories [Seite 325]
8.3.2.2 - Psychological models [Seite 327]
8.3.2.3 - Drama theories [Seite 327]
8.3.2.4 - Audience-centered theories [Seite 328]
8.3.2.5 - Contextual theories [Seite 329]
8.3.2.6 - Hybrid theories [Seite 330]
8.3.3 - A General Framework for Mass Media Scholarship [Seite 330]
8.3.4 - Key Intersections of Social Media Scholarship [Seite 332]
8.3.5 - Case Study: CIRCLE [Seite 334]
8.3.6 - Summary [Seite 335]
8.3.7 - References [Seite 336]
8.4 - 20 The Future of Social Media [Seite 338]
8.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 338]
8.4.2 - The Future Social Media Landscape [Seite 339]
8.4.2.1 - Mobile marketing [Seite 340]
8.4.2.2 - Stand-alone applications [Seite 340]
8.4.2.3 - Wearables [Seite 341]
8.4.2.4 - Visual social media [Seite 341]
8.4.3 - Web 3.0: Asynchronous Mass Delivery [Seite 343]
8.4.4 - Conclusions and Recommendations [Seite 344]
8.4.4.1 - The tipping point of push [Seite 344]
8.4.4.2 - Privacy concerns [Seite 345]
8.4.5 - Case Study: Looking Ahead at Facebook [Seite 347]
8.4.6 - Summary [Seite 349]
8.4.7 - References [Seite 351]
9 - Index [Seite 355]
10 - EULA [Seite 360]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

28,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok