A Companion to Applied Philosophy

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 14. September 2016
  • |
  • 664 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-86911-6 (ISBN)
 
Applied philosophy has been a growing area of research for the last 40 years. Until now, however, almost all of this research has been centered around the field of ethics. A Companion to Applied Philosophy breaks new ground, demonstrating that all areasof philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind, can be applied, and are relevant to questions of everyday life. This perennial topic in philosophy provides an overview of these various applied philosophy developments, highlighting similarities and differences between various areas of applied philosophy, and examining the very nature of this topic. It is an area to which many of the towering figures in the history of philosophy have contributed, and this timely Companion demonstrates how various historical contributions are actually contributions within applied philosophy, even if they are not traditionally seen as such.
The Companion contains 42 essays covering major areas of philosophy; the articles themselves are all original contributions to the literature and represent the state of the art on this topic, as well as offering a map to the current debates.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 2,97 MB
978-1-118-86911-6 (9781118869116)
1118869117 (1118869117)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 7]
4 - Notes on Contributors [Seite 11]
5 - Foreword [Seite 18]
6 - Acknowledgments [Seite 21]
7 - Part I Introductory Articles [Seite 23]
7.1 - Chapter 1 The Nature of Applied Philosophy [Seite 25]
7.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 25]
7.1.2 - The Relevance Conception [Seite 26]
7.1.3 - The Specificity Conception [Seite 29]
7.1.4 - The Practical Conception [Seite 30]
7.1.5 - The Activist Conception [Seite 31]
7.1.6 - The Methodology Conception [Seite 33]
7.1.7 - The Empirical Facts Conception [Seite 34]
7.1.8 - The Audience Conception [Seite 36]
7.1.9 - Conclusion [Seite 37]
7.1.10 - Acknowledgments [Seite 38]
7.1.11 - References [Seite 38]
7.1.12 - Further Reading [Seite 39]
7.2 - Chapter 2 The Methodology of Applied Philosophy [Seite 40]
7.2.1 - Introduction: What Is Applied Philosophy? [Seite 40]
7.2.2 - The Top-Down Model [Seite 42]
7.2.3 - Bottom-Up Models [Seite 46]
7.2.4 - Thought Experiments [Seite 47]
7.2.5 - Expertise [Seite 49]
7.2.6 - Concluding Thoughts [Seite 53]
7.2.7 - References [Seite 53]
7.2.8 - Further Reading [Seite 54]
7.3 - Chapter 3 The Value of Applied Philosophy [Seite 56]
7.3.1 - Differing Views and Different Modes [Seite 57]
7.3.2 - Key Considerations and Assumptions [Seite 59]
7.3.3 - Dual Points of Reference [Seite 60]
7.3.4 - Challenges and Tensions [Seite 62]
7.3.5 - How Should Applied Philosophy Be Practically Relevant? [Seite 63]
7.3.6 - Concluding Remarks [Seite 66]
7.3.7 - Acknowledgments [Seite 67]
7.3.8 - References [Seite 67]
7.3.9 - Further Reading [Seite 69]
8 - Part II Epistemology [Seite 71]
8.1 - Chapter 4 Applied Epistemology [Seite 73]
8.1.1 - Notes [Seite 81]
8.1.2 - References [Seite 82]
8.1.3 - Further Reading [Seite 82]
8.2 - Chapter 5 Gender and Feminist Epistemology [Seite 83]
8.2.1 - Feminist Philosophy as Activist: Doing Philosophy as a Feminist [Seite 83]
8.2.2 - Activist Feminist Epistemology: Changing Focus [Seite 85]
8.2.3 - Situated Knowers and Feminist Standpoint Epistemology [Seite 87]
8.2.4 - Feminist Epistemologies of Science [Seite 89]
8.2.5 - Redefining Objectivity [Seite 90]
8.2.6 - Testimonial Injustice, Ignorance, and Attention to Particulars [Seite 92]
8.2.7 - Conclusion [Seite 94]
8.2.8 - Acknowledgment [Seite 94]
8.2.9 - References [Seite 94]
8.2.10 - Further Reading [Seite 97]
8.3 - Chapter 6 The Epistemology of Deliberative Democracy [Seite 98]
8.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 98]
8.3.2 - The Deliberative Conception of Democracy [Seite 99]
8.3.3 - Instrumental Arguments for Deliberative Democracy [Seite 101]
8.3.4 - Instrumental Arguments against Deliberative Democracy [Seite 103]
8.3.5 - Non-instrumental Arguments for Deliberative Democracy [Seite 104]
8.3.6 - Non-instrumental Arguments against Deliberative Democracy [Seite 106]
8.3.7 - Concluding Remarks [Seite 107]
8.4 - Chapter 7 Information Markets [Seite 111]
8.4.1 - What Are Information Markets? [Seite 111]
8.4.2 - Information Markets and Expertise [Seite 112]
8.4.3 - Some Problems (and Solutions) [Seite 114]
8.4.4 - Information Markets and Applied Social Epistemology: Three Applications [Seite 115]
8.4.5 - Conclusion [Seite 120]
8.4.6 - References [Seite 121]
8.4.7 - Further Reading [Seite 123]
8.5 - Chapter 8 Epistemology for (Real) People [Seite 125]
8.5.1 - Normativity [Seite 125]
8.5.2 - Belief Theories and Reasoning Theories [Seite 126]
8.5.3 - How to Evaluate Reasoning [Seite 127]
8.5.4 - Diagnostic Reasoning [Seite 129]
8.5.5 - Consilience and Mongrel Epistemology [Seite 133]
8.5.6 - Conclusion [Seite 139]
8.5.7 - References [Seite 140]
8.5.8 - Further Reading [Seite 141]
8.6 - Chapter 9 Are Conspiracy Theorists Epistemically Vicious? [Seite 142]
8.6.1 - Introduction [Seite 142]
8.6.2 - Vice, Virtue, and the Intellect [Seite 146]
8.6.3 - Conspiracies, Elites, and the Open Society [Seite 148]
8.6.4 - On the Vices of Anti-Conspiracism [Seite 152]
8.6.5 - Notes [Seite 153]
8.6.6 - References [Seite 153]
8.6.7 - Further Reading [Seite 154]
8.7 - Chapter 10 Experts in the Climate Change Debate [Seite 155]
8.7.1 - Introduction [Seite 155]
8.7.2 - Expertise: Variations and Equivocations [Seite 156]
8.7.3 - Trust (and Its Exploitation) in Climate Debates [Seite 158]
8.7.4 - Climate Consensus and Credibility [Seite 162]
8.7.5 - Going Forward [Seite 164]
8.7.6 - References [Seite 166]
8.7.7 - Further Reading [Seite 168]
8.8 - Chapter 11 Freedom of Expression, Diversity, and Truth [Seite 169]
8.8.1 - Deliberation and Diversity [Seite 170]
8.8.2 - Diversity and the Invisible Hand [Seite 174]
8.8.3 - Promoting Compliance with the Norms of Deliberation [Seite 179]
8.8.4 - Concluding Remarks [Seite 181]
8.8.5 - Acknowledgment [Seite 182]
8.8.6 - References [Seite 182]
8.8.7 - Further Reading [Seite 183]
9 - Part III Metaphysics and Philosophy of Language [Seite 185]
9.1 - Chapter 12 Applied Metaphysics [Seite 187]
9.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 187]
9.1.2 - Applying Metaphysics within Philosophy [Seite 189]
9.1.3 - Case Study I: Applied Ontology [Seite 190]
9.1.4 - Case Study II: Social Ontology [Seite 193]
9.1.5 - Case Study III: Natural Kinds in Psychiatry and Medicine [Seite 196]
9.1.6 - Further Examples [Seite 198]
9.1.7 - Conclusions? [Seite 199]
9.1.8 - Acknowledgments [Seite 200]
9.1.9 - References [Seite 200]
9.1.10 - Further Reading [Seite 201]
9.2 - Chapter 13 Applied Philosophy of Language [Seite 202]
9.2.1 - What Are We Studying When We Study Language? [Seite 203]
9.2.2 - Philosophy of Language as Applied in Terms of Subject Matter [Seite 203]
9.2.3 - The Ontology and Methodology of Natural Language Inquiry [Seite 207]
9.2.4 - A Cognitively Real Semantic Theory and the Search for Evidence [Seite 210]
9.2.5 - Conclusion [Seite 215]
9.2.6 - References [Seite 216]
9.2.7 - Further Reading [Seite 217]
9.3 - Chapter 14 Social Ontology and War [Seite 218]
9.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 218]
9.3.2 - Armed Forces, Waging War, and Joint Action [Seite 221]
9.3.3 - War, Collective Self-Defense, and Collective Moral Responsibility [Seite 224]
9.3.4 - Individualism, Collectivism, and the Principles of Necessity, Proportionality, and Discrimination [Seite 228]
9.3.5 - References [Seite 230]
9.3.6 - Further Reading [Seite 231]
9.4 - Chapter 15 The Metaphysics of Gender [Seite 233]
9.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 233]
9.4.2 - Philosophical Conceptions of Gender [Seite 235]
9.4.3 - Essentialism and Anti-Essentialism [Seite 238]
9.4.4 - Realism and Nominalism [Seite 241]
9.4.5 - Conclusion [Seite 243]
9.4.6 - Acknowledgments [Seite 244]
9.4.7 - References [Seite 244]
9.4.8 - Further Reading [Seite 245]
9.5 - Chapter 16 The Existence of the Dead [Seite 246]
9.5.1 - Being Dead [Seite 246]
9.5.2 - Being Alive [Seite 247]
9.5.3 - Being Neither Dead Nor Alive [Seite 248]
9.5.4 - Resurrection [Seite 249]
9.5.5 - Deathless Annihilation [Seite 249]
9.5.6 - Annihilationless Death [Seite 250]
9.5.7 - Death for Us [Seite 254]
9.5.8 - Applied Philosophy [Seite 256]
9.5.9 - Acknowledgment [Seite 256]
9.5.10 - References [Seite 257]
9.5.11 - Further Reading [Seite 257]
9.6 - Chapter 17 Freedom of Expression and Derogatory Words [Seite 258]
9.6.1 - Introduction [Seite 258]
9.6.2 - Direct and Indirect Hate Speech [Seite 259]
9.6.3 - Five Models of Hate Speech [Seite 260]
9.6.4 - Hate Speech, Non-persuasive Influence, and Harm [Seite 268]
9.6.5 - Regulating Vituperative Expression [Seite 270]
9.6.6 - Hate Speech and Silencing [Seite 270]
9.6.7 - Conclusion [Seite 272]
9.6.8 - References [Seite 272]
9.6.9 - Further Reading [Seite 274]
10 - Part IV Ethics [Seite 275]
10.1 - Chapter 18 Applied Moral Philosophy [Seite 277]
10.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 277]
10.1.2 - Results and Lessons of Following Reflective Equilibrium Methods: Opposed Views [Seite 281]
10.1.3 - Conclusion [Seite 289]
10.1.4 - References [Seite 289]
10.1.5 - Further Reading [Seite 290]
10.2 - Chapter 19 Neuroethics and Responsibility [Seite 292]
10.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 292]
10.2.2 - Neuroethics and the Mental States of Actors [Seite 294]
10.2.3 - The Mental State of the Attributor [Seite 298]
10.2.4 - References [Seite 303]
10.2.5 - Further Reading [Seite 305]
10.3 - Chapter 20 Non-ideal Theory [Seite 306]
10.3.1 - What Is Non-ideal Theory? [Seite 307]
10.3.2 - Varieties of Non-ideal Theory [Seite 309]
10.3.3 - The Relationship between Ideal and Non-ideal Theory [Seite 312]
10.3.4 - Non-ideal Theory, Realism and Applied Philosophy [Seite 316]
10.3.5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 317]
10.3.6 - References [Seite 317]
10.3.7 - Further Reading [Seite 318]
10.4 - Chapter 21 Death: Badness and Prudential Reasons [Seite 319]
10.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 319]
10.4.2 - The Lucretian Problem [Seite 321]
10.4.3 - Psychological Relations [Seite 324]
10.4.4 - Maximization of Intrinsic Value [Seite 328]
10.4.5 - Concluding Remarks [Seite 329]
10.4.6 - Acknowledgment [Seite 330]
10.4.7 - References [Seite 330]
10.4.8 - Further Reading [Seite 331]
11 - Part V Political Philosophy and Philosophy of Law [Seite 333]
11.1 - Chapter 22 Applied Political and Legal Philosophy [Seite 335]
11.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 335]
11.1.2 - Standard Activist Approach [Seite 337]
11.1.3 - Extreme Activist Approach [Seite 340]
11.1.4 - Conceptual Activist Approach [Seite 343]
11.1.5 - Conclusion [Seite 345]
11.1.6 - Notes [Seite 346]
11.1.7 - References [Seite 346]
11.1.8 - Further Reading [Seite 349]
11.2 - Chapter 23 Legal Human Rights Theory [Seite 350]
11.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 350]
11.2.2 - From Human Rights Practice to Human Rights Theory: Law as the Missing Link [Seite 352]
11.2.3 - The Law in "Political" and "Ethical" Human Rights Theories [Seite 355]
11.2.4 - Human Rights Theory qua Legal Theory [Seite 357]
11.2.5 - Legal Human Rights Theory as Applied Philosophy [Seite 359]
11.2.6 - Conclusion [Seite 360]
11.2.7 - References [Seite 361]
11.2.8 - Further Reading [Seite 363]
11.3 - Chapter 24 Collectivism and Reductivism in the Ethics of War [Seite 364]
11.3.1 - The Ethics of War as Applied Philosophy [Seite 364]
11.3.2 - The Origins of the Just War Tradition [Seite 365]
11.3.3 - The Collectivist View [Seite 366]
11.3.4 - The Individualist View [Seite 368]
11.3.5 - Reductive Individualism: Implications and Objections [Seite 370]
11.3.6 - Legitimate Authority [Seite 373]
11.3.7 - Conclusion [Seite 376]
11.3.8 - References [Seite 376]
11.3.9 - Further Reading [Seite 377]
11.4 - Chapter 25 Freedom of Association [Seite 378]
11.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 378]
11.4.2 - The Content of Freedom of Association [Seite 381]
11.4.3 - The Scope and Value of Freedom of Association [Seite 385]
11.4.4 - Conclusion [Seite 390]
11.4.5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 390]
11.4.6 - References [Seite 390]
11.4.7 - Further Reading [Seite 391]
11.5 - Chapter 26 Neuroethics and Criminal Justice [Seite 392]
11.5.1 - Introduction [Seite 392]
11.5.2 - Neuroscience and the Criminal Justice System [Seite 393]
11.5.3 - Neuroethical Challenges [Seite 395]
11.5.4 - Neuroscience and Criminal Justice Ethics [Seite 397]
11.5.5 - Neuroscience, Criminal Justice, and Applied Philosophy [Seite 400]
11.5.6 - Conclusion [Seite 402]
11.5.7 - References [Seite 403]
11.5.8 - Further Reading [Seite 404]
11.6 - Chapter 27 Deliberative Democracy [Seite 405]
11.6.1 - Introduction [Seite 405]
11.6.2 - The Moral Ideal of Deliberative Democracy [Seite 406]
11.6.3 - Cognitive Diversity in Deliberative Democracies [Seite 409]
11.6.4 - The Problem of Rational Ignorance [Seite 410]
11.6.5 - Inequality in Public Deliberation [Seite 414]
11.6.6 - The Problem of Group Polarization [Seite 415]
11.6.7 - References [Seite 416]
11.6.8 - Further Reading [Seite 417]
11.7 - Chapter 28 Tax Ethics: Political and Individual [Seite 419]
11.7.1 - Introduction [Seite 419]
11.7.2 - The Tax System? [Seite 423]
11.7.3 - Tax Justice and Horizontal Equity [Seite 426]
11.7.4 - Taxation and Liberty [Seite 428]
11.7.5 - Taxpayer Morality [Seite 430]
11.7.6 - Conclusion [Seite 431]
11.7.7 - References [Seite 431]
11.7.8 - Further Reading [Seite 432]
11.8 - Chapter 29 Benefiting from Wrongdoing [Seite 433]
11.8.1 - Introduction [Seite 433]
11.8.2 - Benefiting from Wrongdoing as a Problem of Applied Philosophy [Seite 434]
11.8.3 - Two Versions of the Principle of Wrongful Benefits [Seite 435]
11.8.4 - Limiting the Principle [Seite 440]
11.8.5 - The Principle of Wrongful Benefits and Luck Egalitarianism [Seite 442]
11.8.6 - Conclusion [Seite 443]
11.8.7 - References [Seite 444]
11.8.8 - Further Reading [Seite 445]
11.9 - Chapter 30 Freedom of Religion and Expression [Seite 446]
11.9.1 - Freedom of Religion [Seite 446]
11.9.2 - Freedom of Expression [Seite 450]
11.9.3 - Conclusion [Seite 459]
11.9.4 - Notes [Seite 459]
11.9.5 - References [Seite 460]
11.9.6 - Further Reading [Seite 460]
12 - Part VI Philosophy of Science [Seite 461]
12.1 - Chapter 31 Applied Philosophy of Social Science: The Case of the Social Construction of Race [Seite 463]
12.1.1 - Denying the Biological Reality of Race [Seite 464]
12.1.2 - Race as a Social Construction [Seite 466]
12.1.3 - Generalist Elements in the Construction of Race [Seite 470]
12.1.4 - Summary [Seite 474]
12.1.5 - References [Seite 474]
12.2 - Chapter 32 Social Constructivism in Social Science and Science Wars [Seite 477]
12.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 477]
12.2.2 - Constructivism and Natural Science [Seite 478]
12.2.3 - The Science Wars [Seite 481]
12.2.4 - Discourse Analysis: Laclau and Mouffe [Seite 483]
12.2.5 - Social Constructivism in Feminist Philosophy [Seite 486]
12.2.6 - The Impact of Constructivist Arguments [Seite 489]
12.3 - Chapter 33 Did Climate Change Cause That? [Seite 491]
12.3.1 - Increasing Probability [Seite 492]
12.3.2 - The "But-For" Test: Causation as Counterfactual Dependence [Seite 493]
12.3.3 - The Fraction of Attributable Risk [Seite 497]
12.3.4 - The Butterfly Effect [Seite 499]
12.3.5 - Probability Raising and Causal Influence [Seite 500]
12.3.6 - Conclusion [Seite 502]
12.3.7 - References [Seite 502]
12.3.8 - Further Reading [Seite 505]
13 - Part VII Aesthetics [Seite 507]
13.1 - Chapter 34 Applied Aesthetics [Seite 509]
13.1.1 - On the Very Idea of "Applied Aesthetics" [Seite 509]
13.1.2 - The "Top-down" Model of Applied Philosophy in Ethics [Seite 510]
13.1.3 - The Disciplinary Substructures of Ethics and Aesthetics Contrasted [Seite 512]
13.1.4 - The Disciplinary Substructure of Philosophy of Art [Seite 515]
13.1.5 - The Roles of Artistic Practice in Philosophical Thinking about the Arts [Seite 517]
13.1.6 - Conclusions [Seite 520]
13.1.7 - References [Seite 520]
13.1.8 - Further Reading [Seite 522]
13.2 - Chapter 35 Thought Experiments in Aesthetics [Seite 523]
13.2.1 - A Theoretical Thought Experiment in Aesthetics [Seite 523]
13.2.2 - Assessing the Borges-inspired Experimentation [Seite 527]
13.2.3 - Practical and Productive Thought Experiments [Seite 530]
13.2.4 - Coda [Seite 533]
13.2.5 - References [Seite 533]
13.2.6 - Further Reading [Seite 535]
13.3 - Chapter 36 Aesthetic Value, Artistic Value, and Morality [Seite 536]
13.3.1 - Aesthetic, Artistic, and Moral Values [Seite 537]
13.3.2 - Autonomism [Seite 540]
13.3.3 - Art, Cognitive Value, and Moral Education [Seite 541]
13.3.4 - Ethicism [Seite 542]
13.3.5 - Contextualism [Seite 543]
13.3.6 - Art and Censorship [Seite 544]
13.3.7 - References [Seite 546]
13.3.8 - Further Reading [Seite 548]
13.4 - Chapter 37 The Applied Philosophy of Humor [Seite 549]
13.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 549]
13.4.2 - The Philosophy of Humor [Seite 549]
13.4.3 - Comic Amusement is an Emotion [Seite 551]
13.4.4 - Bonding [Seite 553]
13.4.5 - Coping [Seite 556]
13.4.6 - Perspective Modification [Seite 558]
13.4.7 - Summary [Seite 559]
13.4.8 - References [Seite 560]
14 - Part VIII Philosophy of Religion [Seite 561]
14.1 - Chapter 38 Applied Philosophy of Religion [Seite 563]
14.1.1 - Preliminary Reflections on the Character of Applied Philosophy of Religion [Seite 563]
14.1.2 - Philosophy of Religion and the Practical Reality of Religion [Seite 564]
14.1.3 - Religious Epistemology and Religious Authority [Seite 566]
14.1.4 - Religion and Politics [Seite 567]
14.1.5 - The Interdisciplinary Aspect [Seite 569]
14.1.6 - Religious Experience and Religious Mysticism [Seite 571]
14.1.7 - Religious Ethics [Seite 573]
14.1.8 - Acknowledgments [Seite 574]
14.1.9 - References [Seite 575]
14.1.10 - Further Reading [Seite 576]
14.2 - Chapter 39 Thinking about Reported Miracles [Seite 577]
14.2.1 - Introduction [Seite 577]
14.2.2 - Defining a Miracle [Seite 578]
14.2.3 - Miracles and Deities [Seite 581]
14.2.4 - Miracles and Evidence [Seite 582]
14.2.5 - Identifying a Miracle [Seite 583]
14.2.6 - When to Doubt a Miracle Report [Seite 585]
14.2.7 - Evidence for a Reported Miracle [Seite 586]
14.2.8 - References [Seite 588]
14.2.9 - Further Reading [Seite 588]
14.3 - Chapter 40 Religion and Neuroscience [Seite 589]
14.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 589]
14.3.2 - The Cognitive Science of Religion [Seite 590]
14.3.3 - The Neuroscience of Meditation [Seite 593]
14.3.4 - References [Seite 600]
14.3.5 - Further Reading [Seite 602]
15 - Part IX History of Applied Philosophy [Seite 605]
15.1 - Chapter 41 Ancient Applied Philosophy [Seite 607]
15.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 607]
15.1.2 - Ancient Applied Philosophy and the Scope and Nature of Philosophy [Seite 609]
15.1.3 - Ancient Applied Philosophy and Method in Philosophy [Seite 614]
15.1.4 - Two Further Ways in Which Ancient Philosophy Is Applied [Seite 618]
15.1.5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 619]
15.1.6 - References [Seite 619]
15.1.7 - Further Reading [Seite 620]
15.2 - Chapter 42 Modern Applied Philosophy: Kant on Theory and Practice [Seite 621]
15.2.1 - The Concepts of Theory and Practice, Especially in Right and Morality [Seite 622]
15.2.2 - Kant vs. Garve: Theory and Practice in Moral Motivation [Seite 624]
15.2.3 - Kant vs. Mendelssohn: Theory and Practice in the Moral Progress of Humanity [Seite 625]
15.2.4 - Kant vs. Hobbes: Theory and Practice in Politics [Seite 627]
15.2.5 - Notes [Seite 632]
15.2.6 - References [Seite 633]
15.2.7 - Further Reading [Seite 633]
16 - Index [Seite 634]
17 - EULA [Seite 663]

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