Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 6. Juli 2017
  • |
  • 664 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-30117-2 (ISBN)
 
Examines the foundation of pulse power technology in detail to optimize the technology in modern engineering settings
Pulsed power technologies could be an answer to many cutting-edge applications. The challenge is in how to develop this high-power/high-energy technology to fit current market demands of low-energy consuming applications. This book provides a comprehensive look at pulsed power technology and shows how it can be improved upon for the world of today and tomorrow.
Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology focuses on the design and construction of the building blocks as well as their optimum assembly for synergetic high performance of the overall pulsed power system. Filled with numerous design examples throughout, the book offers chapter coverage on various subjects such as: Marx generators and Marx-like circuits; pulse transformers; pulse-forming lines; closing switches; opening switches; multi-gigawatt to multi-terawatt systems; energy storage in capacitor banks; electrical breakdown in gases; electrical breakdown in solids, liquids and vacuum; pulsed voltage and current measurements; electromagnetic interference and noise suppression; and EM topology for interference control. In addition, the book:
* Acts as a reference for practicing engineers as well as a teaching text
* Features relevant design equations derived from the fundamental concepts in a single reference
* Contains lucid presentations of the mechanisms of electrical breakdown in gaseous, liquid, solid and vacuum dielectrics
* Provides extensive illustrations and references
Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology will be an invaluable companion for professionals working in the fields of relativistic electron beams, intense bursts of light and heavy ions, flash X-ray systems, pulsed high magnetic fields, ultra-wide band electromagnetics, nuclear electromagnetic pulse simulation, high density fusion plasma, and high energy- rate metal forming techniques.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Jane Lehr is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Mexico. Prior positions were at Sandia National Laboratories and the Air Force Research Laboratory's Directed Energy Directorate. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, past President of the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society, and currently serves as their Society Fellow Evaluation Chair.
Pralhad Ron, PhD, is a scientist from the Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), India. He retired as Head, Accelerator and Pulsed Power Division (APPD) of BARC. He served as Chairman, Steering Committee on Electron Beam Center, Kharghar, New Bombay, and Chairman, Safety Review Committee on Particle Accelerators in India constituted by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB).
1 - Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology [Seite 1]
2 - Contents [Seite 7]
3 - Preface [Seite 19]
4 - About the Authors [Seite 23]
5 - Acknowledgments [Seite 25]
6 - Introduction [Seite 27]
6.1 - Sources of Information [Seite 30]
6.2 - References [Seite 32]
7 - 1: Marx Generators and Marx-Like Circuits [Seite 35]
7.1 - 1.1 Operational Principles of Simple Marxes [Seite 35]
7.1.1 - 1.1.1 Marx Charge Cycle [Seite 37]
7.1.2 - 1.1.2 Marx Erection [Seite 38]
7.1.2.1 - 1.1.2.1 Switch Preionization by Ultraviolet Radiation [Seite 39]
7.1.2.2 - 1.1.2.2 Switch Overvoltages in an Ideal Marx [Seite 39]
7.1.3 - 1.1.3 Marx Discharge Cycle [Seite 40]
7.1.3.1 - 1.1.3.1 No Fire [Seite 41]
7.1.3.2 - 1.1.3.2 Equivalent Circuit Parameters During Discharge [Seite 41]
7.1.4 - 1.1.4 Load Effects on the Marx Discharge [Seite 44]
7.1.4.1 - 1.1.4.1 Capacitive Loads [Seite 44]
7.1.4.2 - 1.1.4.2 A Marx Charging a Resistive Load [Seite 48]
7.2 - 1.2 Impulse Generators [Seite 49]
7.2.1 - 1.2.1 Exact Solutions [Seite 49]
7.2.2 - 1.2.2 Approximate Solutions [Seite 52]
7.2.3 - 1.2.3 Distributed Front Resistors [Seite 53]
7.3 - 1.3 Effects of Stray Capacitance on Marx Operation [Seite 53]
7.3.1 - 1.3.1 Voltage Division by Stray Capacitance [Seite 54]
7.3.2 - 1.3.2 Exploiting Stray Capacitance: The Wave Erection Marx [Seite 56]
7.3.3 - 1.3.3 The Effects of Interstage Coupling Capacitance [Seite 57]
7.4 - 1.4 Enhanced Triggering Techniques [Seite 60]
7.4.1 - 1.4.1 Capacitive Back-Coupling [Seite 60]
7.4.2 - 1.4.2 Resistive Back-Coupling [Seite 61]
7.4.3 - 1.4.3 Capacitive and Resistively Coupled Marx [Seite 62]
7.4.4 - 1.4.4 The Maxwell Marx [Seite 64]
7.5 - 1.5 Examples of Complex Marx Generators [Seite 65]
7.5.1 - 1.5.1 Hermes I and II [Seite 65]
7.5.2 - 1.5.2 PBFA and Z [Seite 66]
7.5.3 - 1.5.3 Aurora [9] [Seite 67]
7.6 - 1.6 Marx Generator Variations [Seite 67]
7.6.1 - 1.6.1 Marx/PFN with Resistive Load [Seite 69]
7.6.2 - 1.6.2 Helical Line Marx Generator [Seite 72]
7.7 - 1.7 Other Design Considerations [Seite 73]
7.7.1 - 1.7.1 Charging Voltage and Number of Stages [Seite 73]
7.7.2 - 1.7.2 Insulation System [Seite 74]
7.7.3 - 1.7.3 Marx Capacitors [Seite 75]
7.7.4 - 1.7.4 Marx Spark Gaps [Seite 75]
7.7.5 - 1.7.5 Marx Resistors [Seite 76]
7.7.6 - 1.7.6 Marx Initiation [Seite 76]
7.7.7 - 1.7.7 Repetitive Operation [Seite 78]
7.7.8 - 1.7.8 Circuit Modeling [Seite 79]
7.8 - 1.8 Marx-Like Voltage-Multiplying Circuits [Seite 79]
7.8.1 - 1.8.1 The Spiral Generator [Seite 80]
7.8.2 - 1.8.2 Time Isolation Line Voltage Multiplier [Seite 82]
7.8.3 - 1.8.3 The LC Inversion Generator [Seite 83]
7.9 - 1.9 Design Examples [Seite 88]
7.10 - References [Seite 91]
8 - 2: Pulse Transformers [Seite 97]
8.1 - 2.1 Tesla Transformers [Seite 97]
8.1.1 - 2.1.1 Equivalent Circuit and Design Equations [Seite 98]
8.1.2 - 2.1.2 Double Resonance and Waveforms [Seite 99]
8.1.3 - 2.1.3 Off Resonance and Waveforms [Seite 100]
8.1.4 - 2.1.4 Triple Resonance and Waveforms [Seite 101]
8.1.5 - 2.1.5 No Load and Waveforms [Seite 102]
8.1.6 - 2.1.6 Construction and Configurations [Seite 103]
8.2 - 2.2 Transmission Line Transformers [Seite 105]
8.2.1 - 2.2.1 Tapered Transmission Line [Seite 105]
8.2.1.1 - 2.2.1.1 Pulse Distortion [Seite 105]
8.2.1.2 - 2.2.1.2 The Theory of Small Reflections [Seite 106]
8.2.1.3 - 2.2.1.3 Gain of a Tapered Transmission Line Transformer [Seite 111]
8.2.1.4 - 2.2.1.4 The Exponential Tapered Transmission Line [Seite 111]
8.3 - 2.3 Magnetic Induction [Seite 113]
8.3.1 - 2.3.1 Linear Pulse Transformers [Seite 115]
8.3.2 - 2.3.2 Induction Cells [Seite 115]
8.3.3 - 2.3.3 Linear Transformer Drivers [Seite 117]
8.3.3.1 - 2.3.3.1 Operating Principles [Seite 119]
8.3.3.2 - 2.3.3.2 Realized LTD Designs and Performance [Seite 122]
8.4 - 2.4 Design Examples [Seite 124]
8.5 - References [Seite 127]
9 - 3: Pulse Forming Lines [Seite 131]
9.1 - 3.1 Transmission Lines [Seite 131]
9.1.1 - 3.1.1 General Transmission Line Relations [Seite 133]
9.1.2 - 3.1.2 The Transmission Line Pulser [Seite 135]
9.2 - 3.2 Coaxial Pulse Forming Lines [Seite 136]
9.2.1 - 3.2.1 Basic Design Relations [Seite 136]
9.2.2 - 3.2.2 Optimum Impedance for Maximum Voltage [Seite 138]
9.2.3 - 3.2.3 Optimum Impedance for Maximum Energy Store [Seite 139]
9.3 - 3.3 Blumlein PFL [Seite 139]
9.3.1 - 3.3.1 Transient Voltages and Output Waveforms [Seite 141]
9.3.2 - 3.3.2 Coaxial Blumleins [Seite 143]
9.3.3 - 3.3.3 Stacked Blumlein [Seite 145]
9.4 - 3.4 Radial Lines [Seite 147]
9.5 - 3.5 Helical Lines [Seite 150]
9.6 - 3.6 PFL Performance Parameters [Seite 151]
9.6.1 - 3.6.1 Electrical Breakdown [Seite 152]
9.6.2 - 3.6.2 Dielectric Strength [Seite 153]
9.6.2.1 - 3.6.2.1 Solid Dielectric [Seite 153]
9.6.2.2 - 3.6.2.2 Liquid Dielectric [Seite 153]
9.6.2.2.1 - 3.6.2.2.1 Transformer Oil [Seite 154]
9.6.2.2.2 - 3.6.2.2.2 Water [Seite 155]
9.6.2.2.3 - 3.6.2.2.3 Gaseous Dielectric [Seite 157]
9.6.2.2.4 - 3.6.2.2.4 Uniform Fields [Seite 158]
9.6.2.2.5 - 3.6.2.2.5 Divergent Fields [Seite 159]
9.6.3 - 3.6.3 Dielectric Constant [Seite 160]
9.6.4 - 3.6.4 Self-Discharge Time Constant [Seite 160]
9.6.5 - 3.6.5 PFL Switching [Seite 161]
9.7 - 3.7 Pulse Compression [Seite 162]
9.7.1 - 3.7.1 Intermediate Storage Capacitance [Seite 163]
9.7.2 - 3.7.2 Voltage Ramps and Double-Pulse Switching [Seite 163]
9.7.3 - 3.7.3 Pulse Compression on Z [Seite 165]
9.8 - 3.8 Design Examples [Seite 168]
9.9 - References [Seite 175]
10 - 4: Closing Switches [Seite 181]
10.1 - 4.1 Spark Gap Switches [Seite 182]
10.1.1 - 4.1.1 Electrode Geometries [Seite 184]
10.1.2 - 4.1.2 Equivalent Circuit of a Spark Gap [Seite 188]
10.1.2.1 - 4.1.2.1 Capacitance of the Gap [Seite 188]
10.1.2.2 - 4.1.2.2 Resistance of the Arc Channel [Seite 189]
10.1.2.3 - 4.1.2.3 Inductance of Arc Channel [Seite 190]
10.1.3 - 4.1.3 Spark Gap Characteristics [Seite 192]
10.1.3.1 - 4.1.3.1 The Self-Breakdown Voltage and Probability Density Curves [Seite 192]
10.1.3.2 - 4.1.3.2 Delay Time [Seite 194]
10.1.3.3 - 4.1.3.3 Rise Time (tr) [Seite 197]
10.1.3.4 - 4.1.3.4 Burst-Mode Repetitively Pulsed Spark Gaps [Seite 198]
10.1.3.5 - 4.1.3.5 Shot Life [Seite 200]
10.1.3.6 - 4.1.3.6 Electrode Erosion [Seite 201]
10.1.4 - 4.1.4 Current Sharing in Spark Gaps [Seite 206]
10.1.4.1 - 4.1.4.1 Parallel Operation [Seite 206]
10.1.4.2 - 4.1.4.2 Multichanneling Operation [Seite 207]
10.1.5 - 4.1.5 Triggered Spark Gaps [Seite 211]
10.1.5.1 - 4.1.5.1 Operation of Triggered Spark Gaps [Seite 211]
10.1.5.2 - 4.1.5.2 Types of Triggered Switches [Seite 213]
10.1.6 - 4.1.6 Specialized Spark Gap Geometries [Seite 229]
10.1.6.1 - 4.1.6.1 Rail Gaps [Seite 229]
10.1.6.2 - 4.1.6.2 Corona-Stabilized Switches [Seite 231]
10.1.6.3 - 4.1.6.3 Ultra-Wideband Spark Gaps [Seite 233]
10.1.7 - 4.1.7 Materials Used in Spark Gaps [Seite 235]
10.1.7.1 - 4.1.7.1 Switching Media [Seite 235]
10.1.7.2 - 4.1.7.2 Electrode Materials [Seite 237]
10.1.7.3 - 4.1.7.3 Housing Materials [Seite 238]
10.2 - 4.2 Gas Discharge Switches [Seite 238]
10.2.1 - 4.2.1 The Pseudospark Switch [Seite 238]
10.2.1.1 - 4.2.1.1 Trigger Discharge Techniques [Seite 240]
10.2.1.2 - 4.2.1.2 Pseudospark Switch Configurations [Seite 241]
10.2.2 - 4.2.2 Thyratrons [Seite 243]
10.2.3 - 4.2.3 Ignitrons [Seite 247]
10.2.4 - 4.2.4 Krytrons [Seite 248]
10.2.5 - 4.2.5 Radioisotope-Aided Miniature Spark Gap [Seite 250]
10.3 - 4.3 Solid Dielectric Switches [Seite 250]
10.4 - 4.4 Magnetic Switches [Seite 251]
10.4.1 - 4.4.1 The Hysteresis Curve [Seite 252]
10.4.2 - 4.4.2 Magnetic Core Size [Seite 254]
10.5 - 4.5 Solid-State Switches [Seite 255]
10.5.1 - 4.5.1 Thyristor-Based Switches [Seite 257]
10.5.1.1 - 4.5.1.1 Silicon-Controlled Rectifier [Seite 257]
10.5.1.2 - 4.5.1.2 Reverse Switch-On Dynister [Seite 260]
10.5.1.3 - 4.5.1.3 Gate Turn-Off Thyristor [Seite 260]
10.5.1.4 - 4.5.1.4 MOS Controlled Thyristor [Seite 261]
10.5.1.5 - 4.5.1.5 MOS Turn-Off Thyristor [Seite 262]
10.5.1.6 - 4.5.1.6 Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor [Seite 263]
10.5.1.7 - 4.5.1.7 Integrated Gate-Commuted Thyristor [Seite 264]
10.5.2 - 4.5.2 Transistor-Based Switches [Seite 264]
10.5.2.1 - 4.5.2.1 Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor [Seite 264]
10.5.2.2 - 4.5.2.2 Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor [Seite 265]
10.6 - 4.6 Design Examples [Seite 265]
10.7 - References [Seite 269]
11 - 5: Opening Switches [Seite 285]
11.1 - 5.1 Typical Circuits [Seite 285]
11.2 - 5.2 Equivalent Circuit [Seite 287]
11.3 - 5.3 Opening Switch Parameters [Seite 288]
11.3.1 - 5.3.1 Conduction Time [Seite 289]
11.3.2 - 5.3.2 Trigger Source for Closure [Seite 289]
11.3.3 - 5.3.3 Trigger Source for Opening [Seite 290]
11.3.4 - 5.3.4 Opening Time [Seite 290]
11.3.5 - 5.3.5 Dielectric Strength Recovery Rate [Seite 290]
11.4 - 5.4 Opening Switch Configurations [Seite 290]
11.4.1 - 5.4.1 Exploding Fuse [Seite 291]
11.4.1.1 - 5.4.1.1 Exploding Conductor Phenomenon [Seite 292]
11.4.1.2 - 5.4.1.2 Switch Energy Dissipation in the Switch [Seite 294]
11.4.1.3 - 5.4.1.3 Time for Vaporization [Seite 295]
11.4.1.4 - 5.4.1.4 Energy for Vaporization [Seite 296]
11.4.1.5 - 5.4.1.5 Optimum Fuse Length [Seite 297]
11.4.1.6 - 5.4.1.6 Fuse Assembly Construction [Seite 297]
11.4.1.7 - 5.4.1.7 Multistage Switching [Seite 299]
11.4.1.8 - 5.4.1.8 Performances of Fuse Switches [Seite 301]
11.4.2 - 5.4.2 Electron Beam-Controlled Switch [Seite 301]
11.4.2.1 - 5.4.2.1 Electron Number Density (ne) [Seite 303]
11.4.2.2 - 5.4.2.2 Discharge Resistivity (?) [Seite 305]
11.4.2.3 - 5.4.2.3 Switching Time Behavior [Seite 305]
11.4.2.4 - 5.4.2.4 Efficiency of EBCS [Seite 308]
11.4.2.5 - 5.4.2.5 Discharge Instabilities [Seite 310]
11.4.2.6 - 5.4.2.6 Switch Dielectric [Seite 311]
11.4.2.7 - 5.4.2.7 Switch Dimensions [Seite 312]
11.4.3 - 5.4.3 Vacuum Arc Switch [Seite 314]
11.4.3.1 - 5.4.3.1 Mechanical Breaker [Seite 314]
11.4.3.2 - 5.4.3.2 Magnetic Vacuum Breaker [Seite 316]
11.4.3.3 - 5.4.3.3 Mechanical Magnetic Vacuum Breaker [Seite 317]
11.4.4 - 5.4.4 Explosive Switch [Seite 318]
11.4.5 - 5.4.5 Explosive Plasma Switch [Seite 320]
11.4.6 - 5.4.6 Plasma Erosion Switch [Seite 320]
11.4.7 - 5.4.7 Dense Plasma Focus [Seite 321]
11.4.8 - 5.4.8 Plasma Implosion Switch [Seite 323]
11.4.9 - 5.4.9 Reflex Switch [Seite 324]
11.4.10 - 5.4.10 Crossed Field Tube [Seite 325]
11.4.11 - 5.4.11 Miscellaneous [Seite 327]
11.5 - 5.5 Design Example [Seite 328]
11.6 - References [Seite 329]
12 - 6: Multigigawatt to Multiterawatt Systems [Seite 337]
12.1 - 6.1 Capacitive Storage [Seite 339]
12.1.1 - 6.1.1 Primary Capacitor Storage [Seite 339]
12.1.2 - 6.1.2 Primary-Intermediate Capacitor Storage [Seite 340]
12.1.3 - 6.1.3 Primary-Intermediate-Fast Capacitor Storage [Seite 341]
12.1.3.1 - 6.1.3.1 Fast Marx Generator [Seite 342]
12.1.4 - 6.1.4 Parallel Operation of Marx Generators [Seite 342]
12.1.5 - 6.1.5 Pulse Forming Line Requirements for Optimum Performance [Seite 343]
12.1.5.1 - 6.1.5.1 Peak Power Delivery into a Matched Load [Seite 343]
12.1.5.2 - 6.1.5.2 Low-Impedance PFLs [Seite 344]
12.1.5.3 - 6.1.5.3 Pulse Time Compression [Seite 344]
12.2 - 6.2 Inductive Storage Systems [Seite 345]
12.2.1 - 6.2.1 Primary Inductor Storage [Seite 345]
12.2.2 - 6.2.2 Cascaded Inductor Storage [Seite 345]
12.3 - 6.3 Magnetic Pulse Compression [Seite 347]
12.4 - 6.4 Inductive Voltage Adder [Seite 349]
12.5 - 6.5 Induction Linac Techniques [Seite 351]
12.5.1 - 6.5.1 Magnetic Core Induction Linacs [Seite 351]
12.5.2 - 6.5.2 Pulsed Line Induction Linacs [Seite 353]
12.5.3 - 6.5.3 Autoaccelerator Induction Linac [Seite 356]
12.6 - 6.6 Design Examples [Seite 357]
12.7 - References [Seite 362]
13 - 7: Energy Storage in Capacitor Banks [Seite 365]
13.1 - 7.1 Basic Equations [Seite 365]
13.1.1 - 7.1.1 Case 1: Lossless, Undamped Circuit ? = 0 [Seite 367]
13.1.2 - 7.1.2 Case 2: Overdamped Circuit ? > 1 [Seite 368]
13.1.3 - 7.1.3 Case 3: Underdamped Circuit ? < 1 [Seite 370]
13.1.4 - 7.1.4 Case 4: Critically Damped Circuit ? = 1 [Seite 370]
13.1.5 - 7.1.5 Comparison of Circuit Responses [Seite 371]
13.2 - 7.2 Capacitor Bank Circuit Topology [Seite 372]
13.2.1 - 7.2.1 Equivalent Circuit of a Low-Energy Capacitor Bank [Seite 373]
13.2.2 - 7.2.2 Equivalent Circuit of a High-Energy Capacitor Bank [Seite 374]
13.3 - 7.3 Charging Supply [Seite 376]
13.3.1 - 7.3.1 Constant Voltage (Resistive) Charging [Seite 376]
13.3.2 - 7.3.2 Constant Current Charging [Seite 378]
13.3.3 - 7.3.3 Constant Power Charging [Seite 379]
13.4 - 7.4 Components of a Capacitor Bank [Seite 379]
13.4.1 - 7.4.1 Energy Storage Capacitor [Seite 380]
13.4.1.1 - 7.4.1.1 Capacitor Parameters [Seite 381]
13.4.1.2 - 7.4.1.2 Test Methods [Seite 383]
13.4.1.3 - 7.4.1.3 Pulse Repetition Frequency [Seite 383]
13.4.1.4 - 7.4.1.4 Recent Advances [Seite 383]
13.4.2 - 7.4.2 Trigger Pulse Generator [Seite 384]
13.4.3 - 7.4.3 Transmission Lines [Seite 386]
13.4.3.1 - 7.4.3.1 Coaxial Cables [Seite 387]
13.4.3.2 - 7.4.3.2 Sandwich Lines [Seite 389]
13.4.4 - 7.4.4 Power Feed [Seite 390]
13.5 - 7.5 Safety [Seite 391]
13.6 - 7.6 Typical Capacitor Bank Configurations [Seite 395]
13.7 - 7.7 Example Problems [Seite 397]
13.8 - References [Seite 400]
14 - 8: Electrical Breakdown in Gases [Seite 403]
14.1 - 8.1 Kinetic Theory of Gases [Seite 403]
14.1.1 - 8.1.1 The Kinetic Theory of Neutral Gases [Seite 404]
14.1.1.1 - 8.1.1.1 Maxwell-Boltzmann Distribution of Velocities [Seite 405]
14.1.1.2 - 8.1.1.2 Mean Free Path [Seite 407]
14.1.2 - 8.1.2 The Kinetic Theory of Ionized Gases [Seite 411]
14.1.2.1 - 8.1.2.1 Energy Gained from the Electric Field [Seite 412]
14.1.2.2 - 8.1.2.2 Elastic Collisions [Seite 412]
14.1.2.3 - 8.1.2.3 Inelastic Collisions [Seite 413]
14.1.2.4 - 8.1.2.4 Total Collisional Cross Section [Seite 417]
14.2 - 8.2 Early Experiments in Electrical Breakdown [Seite 418]
14.2.1 - 8.2.1 Paschen's Law [Seite 418]
14.2.2 - 8.2.2 Townsend's Experiments [Seite 419]
14.2.2.1 - 8.2.2.1 Region I: The Ionization-Free Region [Seite 420]
14.2.2.2 - 8.2.2.2 Region II: The Townsend First Ionization Region [Seite 420]
14.2.2.3 - 8.2.2.3 Region III: Townsend Second Ionization Region [Seite 421]
14.2.3 - 8.2.3 Paschen's Law Revisited [Seite 421]
14.2.4 - 8.2.4 The Electron Avalanche [Seite 425]
14.3 - 8.3 Mechanisms of Spark Formation [Seite 427]
14.3.1 - 8.3.1 The Townsend Discharge [Seite 428]
14.3.1.1 - 8.3.1.1 Multiple Secondary Mechanisms [Seite 430]
14.3.1.2 - 8.3.1.2 Generalized Townsend Breakdown Criterion [Seite 432]
14.3.1.3 - 8.3.1.3 Townsend Criterion in Nonuniform Geometries [Seite 433]
14.3.1.4 - 8.3.1.4 Modifications for Electronegative Gases [Seite 434]
14.3.2 - 8.3.2 Theory of the Streamer Mechanism [Seite 434]
14.3.2.1 - 8.3.2.1 Criterion for Streamer Onset [Seite 435]
14.3.2.2 - 8.3.2.2 The Electric Field Along the Avalanche [Seite 440]
14.3.2.3 - 8.3.2.3 A Qualitative Description of Streamer Formation [Seite 441]
14.3.2.4 - 8.3.2.4 Streamer Criterion in Nonuniform Electric Fields [Seite 444]
14.3.2.5 - 8.3.2.5 The Overvolted Streamer [Seite 445]
14.3.2.6 - 8.3.2.6 Pedersen's Criterion [Seite 446]
14.4 - 8.4 The Corona Discharge [Seite 447]
14.5 - 8.5 Pseudospark Discharges [Seite 449]
14.5.1 - 8.5.1 The Prebreakdown Regime [Seite 449]
14.5.2 - 8.5.2 Breakdown Regime [Seite 450]
14.6 - 8.6 Breakdown Behavior of Gaseous SF6 [Seite 451]
14.6.1 - 8.6.1 Electrode Material [Seite 452]
14.6.2 - 8.6.2 Surface Area and Surface Finish [Seite 452]
14.6.3 - 8.6.3 Gap Spacing and High Pressures [Seite 453]
14.6.4 - 8.6.4 Insulating Spacer [Seite 454]
14.6.5 - 8.6.5 Contamination by Conducting Particles [Seite 454]
14.7 - 8.7 Intershields for Optimal Use of Insulation [Seite 455]
14.7.1 - 8.7.1 Cylindrical Geometry [Seite 455]
14.7.1.1 - 8.7.1.1 Two-Electrode Concentric Cylinders [Seite 456]
14.7.1.2 - 8.7.1.2 Cylindrical Geometry with an Intershield [Seite 457]
14.7.1.3 - 8.7.1.3 Intershield Effectiveness [Seite 460]
14.7.2 - 8.7.2 Spherical Geometry [Seite 460]
14.7.2.1 - 8.7.2.1 Two Concentric Spheres [Seite 460]
14.7.2.2 - 8.7.2.2 A Spherical Geometry with an Intershield [Seite 460]
14.8 - 8.8 Design Examples [Seite 461]
14.9 - References [Seite 467]
15 - 9: Electrical Breakdown in Solids, Liquids, and Vacuum [Seite 473]
15.1 - 9.1 Solids [Seite 473]
15.1.1 - 9.1.1 Breakdown Mechanisms in Solids [Seite 474]
15.1.1.1 - 9.1.1.1 Intrinsic Breakdown [Seite 474]
15.1.1.2 - 9.1.1.2 Thermal Breakdown [Seite 476]
15.1.1.3 - 9.1.1.3 Electromechanical Breakdown [Seite 478]
15.1.1.4 - 9.1.1.4 Partial Discharges [Seite 479]
15.1.1.5 - 9.1.1.5 Electrical Trees [Seite 481]
15.1.2 - 9.1.2 Methods of Improving Solid Insulator Performance [Seite 483]
15.1.2.1 - 9.1.2.1 Insulation in Energy Storage Capacitors [Seite 483]
15.1.2.2 - 9.1.2.2 Surge Voltage Distribution in a Tesla Transformer [Seite 483]
15.1.2.3 - 9.1.2.3 Surface Flashover in Standoff Insulators [Seite 484]
15.1.2.4 - 9.1.2.4 General Care for Fabrication and Assembly [Seite 486]
15.2 - 9.2 Liquids [Seite 486]
15.2.1 - 9.2.1 Breakdown Mechanisms in Liquids [Seite 486]
15.2.1.1 - 9.2.1.1 Particle Alignment [Seite 486]
15.2.1.2 - 9.2.1.2 Electronic Breakdown [Seite 487]
15.2.1.3 - 9.2.1.3 Streamers in Bubbles [Seite 487]
15.2.2 - 9.2.2 Mechanisms of Bubble Formation [Seite 489]
15.2.2.1 - 9.2.2.1 Krasucki's Hypothesis [Seite 489]
15.2.2.2 - 9.2.2.2 Kao's Hypothesis [Seite 489]
15.2.2.3 - 9.2.2.3 Sharbaugh and Watson Hypothesis [Seite 490]
15.2.3 - 9.2.3 Breakdown Features of Water [Seite 491]
15.2.3.1 - 9.2.3.1 Dependence of Breakdown Strength on Pulse Duration [Seite 491]
15.2.3.2 - 9.2.3.2 Dependence of Breakdown Voltage on Polarity [Seite 491]
15.2.3.3 - 9.2.3.3 Electric Field Intensification [Seite 491]
15.2.4 - 9.2.4 Methods of Improving Liquid Dielectric Performance [Seite 491]
15.2.4.1 - 9.2.4.1 New Compositions [Seite 492]
15.2.4.2 - 9.2.4.2 Addition of Electron Scavengers [Seite 492]
15.2.4.3 - 9.2.4.3 Liquid Mixtures [Seite 492]
15.2.4.4 - 9.2.4.4 Impregnation [Seite 492]
15.2.4.5 - 9.2.4.5 Purification [Seite 493]
15.3 - 9.3 Vacuum [Seite 493]
15.3.1 - 9.3.1 Vacuum Breakdown Mechanisms [Seite 493]
15.3.1.1 - 9.3.1.1 ABCD Mechanism [Seite 494]
15.3.1.2 - 9.3.1.2 Field Emission-Initiated Breakdown [Seite 494]
15.3.1.3 - 9.3.1.3 Microparticle-Initiated Breakdown [Seite 496]
15.3.1.4 - 9.3.1.4 Plasma Flare-Initiated Breakdown [Seite 497]
15.3.2 - 9.3.2 Improving Vacuum Insulation Performance [Seite 498]
15.3.2.1 - 9.3.2.1 Conditioning [Seite 498]
15.3.2.2 - 9.3.2.2 Surface Treatment and Coatings [Seite 501]
15.3.3 - 9.3.3 Triple-Point Junction Modifications [Seite 501]
15.3.4 - 9.3.4 Vacuum Magnetic Insulation [Seite 502]
15.3.5 - 9.3.5 Surface Flashover Across Solids in Vacuum [Seite 505]
15.3.5.1 - 9.3.5.1 Secondary Electron Emission from Dielectric Surfaces [Seite 505]
15.3.5.2 - 9.3.5.2 Saturated Secondary Electron Emission Avalanche [Seite 507]
15.4 - 9.4 Composite Dielectrics [Seite 513]
15.5 - 9.5 Design Examples [Seite 515]
15.6 - References [Seite 520]
16 - 10: Pulsed Voltage and Current Measurements [Seite 527]
16.1 - 10.1 Pulsed Voltage Measurement [Seite 527]
16.1.1 - 10.1.1 Spark Gaps [Seite 527]
16.1.1.1 - 10.1.1.1 Peak Voltage of Pulses (>1?s) [Seite 528]
16.1.1.2 - 10.1.1.2 Peak Voltage of Pulses (<1?s) [Seite 529]
16.1.2 - 10.1.2 Crest Voltmeters [Seite 530]
16.1.3 - 10.1.3 Voltage Dividers [Seite 532]
16.1.3.1 - 10.1.3.1 Resistive Divider [Seite 532]
16.1.3.2 - 10.1.3.2 Capacitive Dividers [Seite 541]
16.1.4 - 10.1.4 Electro-optical Techniques [Seite 545]
16.1.4.1 - 10.1.4.1 The Kerr Cell [Seite 545]
16.1.4.2 - 10.1.4.2 The Pockels Cell [Seite 549]
16.1.5 - 10.1.5 Reflection Attenuator [Seite 552]
16.2 - 10.2 Pulsed Current Measurement [Seite 553]
16.2.1 - 10.2.1 Current Viewing Resistor [Seite 553]
16.2.1.1 - 10.2.1.1 Energy Capacity [Seite 553]
16.2.1.2 - 10.2.1.2 Configurations [Seite 554]
16.2.1.3 - 10.2.1.3 Tolerance in Resistance [Seite 555]
16.2.1.4 - 10.2.1.4 Physical Dimensions [Seite 557]
16.2.1.5 - 10.2.1.5 Frequency Response [Seite 557]
16.2.2 - 10.2.2 Rogowski Coil [Seite 557]
16.2.2.1 - 10.2.2.1 Voltage Induced in the Rogowski Coil [Seite 558]
16.2.2.2 - 10.2.2.2 Compensated Rogowski Coil [Seite 559]
16.2.2.3 - 10.2.2.3 Self-Integrating Rogowski Coil [Seite 561]
16.2.2.4 - 10.2.2.4 Construction [Seite 563]
16.2.3 - 10.2.3 Inductive (B-dot) Probe [Seite 563]
16.2.4 - 10.2.4 Current Transformer [Seite 564]
16.2.5 - 10.2.5 Magneto-optic Current Transformer [Seite 564]
16.2.5.1 - 10.2.5.1 Basic Principles [Seite 565]
16.2.5.2 - 10.2.5.2 Intensity Relations for Single-Beam Detector [Seite 566]
16.2.5.3 - 10.2.5.3 Intensity Relations for Differential Split-Beam Detector [Seite 566]
16.2.5.4 - 10.2.5.4 Light Source [Seite 567]
16.2.5.5 - 10.2.5.5 Magneto-optic Sensor [Seite 567]
16.2.5.6 - 10.2.5.6 Frequency Response [Seite 567]
16.2.5.7 - 10.2.5.7 Device Configurations [Seite 567]
16.3 - 10.3 Design Examples [Seite 569]
16.4 - References [Seite 572]
17 - 11: Electromagnetic Interference and Noise Suppression [Seite 581]
17.1 - 11.1 Interference Coupling Modes [Seite 581]
17.1.1 - 11.1.1 Coupling in Long Transmission Lines [Seite 582]
17.1.1.1 - 11.1.1.1 Capacitive Coupling [Seite 582]
17.1.1.2 - 11.1.1.2 Radiative Coupling [Seite 584]
17.1.1.3 - 11.1.1.3 Inductive Coupling [Seite 584]
17.1.2 - 11.1.2 Common Impedance Coupling [Seite 584]
17.1.3 - 11.1.3 Coupling of Short Transmission Lines over a Ground Plane [Seite 585]
17.1.3.1 - 11.1.3.1 Voltages Induced by Transients [Seite 587]
17.1.3.2 - 11.1.3.2 Modification of Inductances by the Ground Plane [Seite 590]
17.2 - 11.2 Noise Suppression Techniques [Seite 593]
17.2.1 - 11.2.1 Shielded Enclosure [Seite 593]
17.2.1.1 - 11.2.1.1 Absorption Loss (A) [Seite 595]
17.2.1.2 - 11.2.1.2 Reflection Loss (R) [Seite 595]
17.2.1.3 - 11.2.1.3 Correction Factor (?) [Seite 597]
17.2.1.4 - 11.2.1.4 Shielding Effectiveness for Plane Waves [Seite 597]
17.2.1.5 - 11.2.1.5 Shielding Effectiveness for High-Impedance E and Low-Impedance H Fields [Seite 598]
17.2.1.6 - 11.2.1.6 Typical Shielding Effectiveness of a Simple Practical Enclosure [Seite 599]
17.2.1.7 - 11.2.1.7 Twisted Shielded Pair [Seite 599]
17.2.2 - 11.2.2 Grounding and Ground Loops [Seite 600]
17.2.2.1 - 11.2.2.1 Low-Impedance Bypass Path [Seite 601]
17.2.2.2 - 11.2.2.2 Single-Point Grounding [Seite 602]
17.2.2.3 - 11.2.2.3 Breaking Ground Loops with Optical Isolation [Seite 602]
17.2.3 - 11.2.3 Power Line Filters [Seite 603]
17.2.3.1 - 11.2.3.1 Types of Filters [Seite 603]
17.2.3.2 - 11.2.3.2 Insertion Loss [Seite 604]
17.2.4 - 11.2.4 Isolation Transformer [Seite 605]
17.3 - 11.3 Well-Shielded Equipment Topology [Seite 606]
17.3.1 - 11.3.1 High-Interference Immunity Measurement System [Seite 608]
17.3.2 - 11.3.2 Immunity Technique for Free Field Measurements [Seite 609]
17.4 - 11.4 Design Examples [Seite 609]
17.5 - References [Seite 615]
18 - 12: EM Topology for Interference Control [Seite 619]
18.1 - 12.1 Topological Design [Seite 620]
18.1.1 - 12.1.1 Series Decomposition [Seite 621]
18.1.2 - 12.1.2 Parallel Decomposition [Seite 622]
18.2 - 12.2 Shield Penetrations [Seite 623]
18.2.1 - 12.2.1 Necessity for Grounding [Seite 624]
18.2.2 - 12.2.2 Grounding Conductors [Seite 625]
18.2.3 - 12.2.3 Groundable Conductors [Seite 626]
18.2.4 - 12.2.4 Insulated Conductors [Seite 626]
18.3 - 12.3 Shield Apertures [Seite 629]
18.4 - 12.4 Diffusive Penetration [Seite 631]
18.4.1 - 12.4.1 Cavity Fields [Seite 633]
18.4.1.1 - 12.4.1.1 Frequency Domain Solutions [Seite 634]
18.4.1.2 - 12.4.1.2 Time Domain Solutions [Seite 635]
18.4.2 - 12.4.2 Single Panel Entry [Seite 637]
18.4.3 - 12.4.3 Voltages Induced by Diffusive Penetration [Seite 638]
18.5 - 12.5 Design Examples [Seite 638]
18.6 - References [Seite 640]
19 - Index [Seite 643]
20 - End User License Agreement [Seite 661]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

116,99 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen