Open Innovation

Corporate Incubator
 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 3. Januar 2019
  • |
  • 240 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-57910-6 (ISBN)
 
The corporate start-up incubator is currently developing in large companies as an essential approach to open innovation. It faces a global system involving varied contexts, issues and actors. Its implementation is an art and to succeed the corporate incubator must become a real "interaction architect". Using testimonials and real case studies, the author takes a dive into the structural and social mysteries of corporate incubators. By analyzing the complex mechanisms of interactions, this book decrypts and reveals the keys to the success of these devices and to opening innovation in a broad sense. The concept of an "interaction architect" is related to the art of building fruitful interactions within human systems. Being aware that social systems exist is good, but knowing how to manage them is better.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 4,02 MB
978-1-119-57910-6 (9781119579106)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Pascal Latouche holds a PhD in management sciences from the University of Paris-Saclay in France. His research interests include the practical applications of open innovation in industry.
  • Cover
  • Half-Title Page
  • Dedication
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • The mysteries of CI
  • Manager and researcher. and why not?
  • Peers in CI
  • CI is a rehash of OI
  • The problem to be solved
  • Pragmatic markers
  • Institutional work
  • Translation
  • Adaptation
  • Essential points
  • Structure of the book
  • 1. Innovation: a Story Without an End
  • 1.1. The concept of managerial innovation (MI)
  • 1.1.1. Evolution up until the 1990s
  • 1.1.2. The 2000s: democratization of the concept
  • 1.1.3. The characteristics of MI
  • 1.2. MI in the company
  • 1.2.1. The Oslo Manual
  • 1.2.2. The results of the CIS 2010 survey
  • 1.2.3. Various illustrations
  • 1.3. Open innovation (OI)
  • 1.3.1. Research directions on OI
  • 1.3.2. New research perspectives on OI
  • 1.3.3. Characteristics of OI
  • 1.3.4. OI in the firm
  • 1.4. Conclusion
  • 2. Incubators and Other Accelerators: the Joys of Diversity?
  • 2.1. Definition(s) and form(s) of incubators
  • 2.1.1. Definition(s) of incubation
  • 2.1.2. The different forms of incubation
  • 2.1.3. The diversity of forms of incubation in France
  • 2.1.4. The "accelerator/incubator" subtlety
  • 2.2. Large groups/start-ups: motivation under pressure!
  • 2.2.1. An omnipresent political world
  • 2.2.2. The context of large groups
  • 2.2.3. The context of start-ups
  • 2.3. The entrepreneurial policy of large groups
  • 2.3.1. Distrust is necessary
  • 2.3.2. A marriage of challenges
  • 2.3.3. Good heart against bad fortune, or the marriage of convenience!
  • 2.4. No research on corporate incubation
  • 2.4.1. No direct research on CI
  • 2.4.2. The emergence of a perspective
  • 2.5. Conclusion
  • 3. The Architects of Interactions: the Four Strategic Access Points
  • 3.1. The problematization of the CI
  • 3.2. The work of "managerial curation"
  • 3.3. The work of "motivation"
  • 3.4. The work of "building identity networks"
  • 3.5. The work of "changing normative associations"
  • 3.6. Grid of strategic access points, in summary
  • 4. Topography: the Characteristics of a Structure
  • 4.1. The characteristics of a structure
  • 4.2. Relative advantages
  • 4.3. Complexity
  • 4.3.1. Irrational complexities
  • 4.3.2. Rational complexities
  • 4.3.3. The assessment
  • 4.4. Ambiguity
  • 4.5. Conclusion
  • 5. Adaptation in situ: Levers for Manipulation
  • 5.1. The role of adaptation
  • 5.2. Hard facts and soft facts
  • 5.2.1. Hard facts of the CI
  • 5.2.2. Soft facts of the CI
  • 5.3. "FCE-influencers"
  • 5.4. "FCE-products"
  • 5.5. Conclusion
  • 6. When Practice Becomes the Model to Follow: the Adoption of CI
  • 6.1. The company microcosm: a determining role in the stage of problematization
  • 6.2. Institutional work: a group of systems and practices
  • 6.3. Translation, a driver for institutional work
  • 6.4. Adaptation or translation in situ
  • 6.5. Conceptual links
  • 6.6. The institutional adoption pyramid
  • 7. CI Example A: the "Boss's Thing"
  • 7.1. Corporate context of CI A
  • 7.2. CI A players
  • 7.3. The structure of CI A
  • 7.4. The tasks and operations of CI A
  • 7.5. The tools of CI A
  • 7.6. Overview of CI A
  • 8. CI Example B: Money doesn't make you happy
  • 8.1. The corporate context of CI B
  • 8.2. CI B players
  • 8.3. The structure of the CI B
  • 8.4. Tasks and missions of the CI B
  • 8.5. The tools of the CI B
  • 8.6. Summary of the CI B
  • 9. CI Example C: Reducing the Wide Gap
  • 9.1. The corporate context of CI C
  • 9.2. CI C players
  • 9.3. The structure of CI C
  • 9.4. Tasks and missions of CI C
  • 9.5. The tools of CI C
  • 9.6. Summary of CI C
  • 10. CI Example D: "Two-pillar" Centralism
  • 10.1. The corporate context of CI D
  • 10.2. CI D players
  • 10.3. The structure of CI D
  • 10.4. Tasks and missions of CI D
  • 10.5. The tools of CI D
  • 10.6. Summary of CI D
  • 11. CI Example E: the Art of Pivot
  • 11.1. The corporate context of CI E
  • 11.2. CI E players
  • 11.3. The structure of CI E
  • 11.4. Tasks and missions of CI E
  • 11.5. The tools of CI E
  • 11.6. Summary of CI E
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledging the issue: the quality of "problem-framing" by the CI
  • Work areas: "try, try and try again!"
  • Awareness of the organization
  • Performance indicators
  • Understanding of the situations and people to perpetuate
  • The resource-based view: an additional approach and a major issue
  • References
  • Index
  • Other titles from iSTE in Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Management
  • EULA

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