The Handbook of Financial Communication and Investor Relations

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 6. September 2017
  • |
  • 544 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-24080-8 (ISBN)
 
The first book to offer a global look at the state-of-the-art thinking and practice in investor relations and financial communication
Featuring contributions from leading scholars and practitioners in financial communication and related fields--including public relations, corporate communications, finance, and accounting-- this volume in the critically acclaimed "Handbooks in Communication and Media" seriesprovides readers with a comprehensive, up-to-date picture of investor relations and financial communications as they are practice in North America and around the world.
The Handbook of Financial Communication and Investor Relations provides an overview of the past, present, and future of investor relations and financial communications as a profession. It identifies the central issues of contemporary investor relations and financial communications practice, including financial information versus non-financial information, intangibles, risk, value, and growth. Authors address key topics of concern to contemporary practitioners, such as socially responsible investing, corporate governance, shareholder activism, ethics, and professionalism. In addition, the book arms readers with metrics and proven techniques for reliably measuring and evaluating the effectiveness of investor relations and financial communications.
Bringing together the most up-to-date research on investor relations and financial communication and the insights and expertise of an all-star team of practitioners, The Handbook of Financial Communication and Investor Relations:
* Explores how the profession is practiced in various regions of the globe, including North America, South America, Europe, the Middle East, India, Australia, and other areas
* Provides a unique look at financial communication as it is practiced beyond the corporate world, including in families, the medical profession, government, and the not-for-profit sector
* Addresses "big-picture" strategies as well as specific tactics for financial communication during crises, the use of social media, dealing with shareholder activism, integrated reporting and CSR, and more
This book makes an ideal text for undergrads and graduate students, scholars, and practitioners studying or researching investor relations and financial communication across schools of communication, journalism, business, and management. It also offers professionals an up-to-date, uniquely holistic look at best practices in financial communication investor relations worldwide.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 6,29 MB
978-1-119-24080-8 (9781119240808)
1119240808 (1119240808)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - The Handbook of Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 3]
2 - Contents [Seite 7]
3 - Notes on Contributors [Seite 11]
4 - Part I The Foundations of Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 23]
4.1 - 1 Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 25]
4.1.1 - Definitions [Seite 25]
4.1.1.1 - Return on Expectations [Seite 25]
4.1.1.2 - Efficient Market Hypothesis [Seite 27]
4.1.2 - A History of Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 27]
4.1.2.1 - Preprofessional Period [Seite 27]
4.1.2.2 - Professional Period [Seite 31]
4.1.3 - Conclusion [Seite 41]
4.1.4 - References [Seite 42]
4.2 - 2 Crisis Communication [Seite 45]
4.2.1 - The Effects of Crises on Stock Market Prices [Seite 45]
4.2.1.1 - Product Safety Crises: Recalls [Seite 45]
4.2.1.2 - Boycotts and Protests [Seite 48]
4.2.1.3 - Management Misconduct [Seite 48]
4.2.2 - Communication and Market Reactions to Crises [Seite 48]
4.2.2.1 - Recall Remedies [Seite 49]
4.2.2.2 - Recall Communication Strategies [Seite 49]
4.2.2.3 - Pre-recall Advertising [Seite 50]
4.2.3 - Interpolating Crisis Communication Research and Effects of Investor Reactions to Crises [Seite 50]
4.2.3.1 - Stealing Thunder [Seite 51]
4.2.3.2 - Denial as a Crisis Response [Seite 51]
4.2.3.3 - Victim-Centered Crisis Responses [Seite 52]
4.2.4 - Conclusion [Seite 52]
4.2.5 - References [Seite 52]
4.3 - 3 Risk, Uncertainty, and Message Convergence [Seite 55]
4.3.1 - Conceptualization of Risk in the Context of Finances [Seite 55]
4.3.2 - Social Amplification of Risk [Seite 58]
4.3.3 - Message Convergence: An Argumentation Alternative [Seite 58]
4.3.4 - The Message Convergence Framework and the Construal of Financial Risks [Seite 60]
4.3.4.1 - Message Encounter [Seite 60]
4.3.4.2 - Consistency Evaluation [Seite 60]
4.3.4.3 - Validity Assessment [Seite 60]
4.3.4.4 - Amplification or Attenuation [Seite 61]
4.3.4.5 - Message Construal [Seite 62]
4.3.4.6 - Conclusion About the Message [Seite 62]
4.3.5 - Discussion and Recommendations [Seite 62]
4.3.5.1 - Environmental Scanning [Seite 62]
4.3.5.2 - Strategic Message Design [Seite 62]
4.3.5.3 - Feedback Loops [Seite 63]
4.3.6 - Conclusion [Seite 63]
4.3.7 - References [Seite 63]
4.4 - 4 The Role of Argumentation in Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 67]
4.4.1 - The Rhetorical Component of Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 67]
4.4.2 - Financial Communication and Investor Relations as Strategic Argumentation [Seite 69]
4.4.3 - Argumentative Issues and Standpoints in Financial Communication [Seite 71]
4.4.4 - What Makes Information Relevant? A Model of Argumentative Inference [Seite 73]
4.4.5 - Argumentation Approaches to Financial Communication: An Overview [Seite 75]
4.4.6 - Conclusion: Sketching a Research Agenda [Seite 77]
4.4.7 - Notes [Seite 79]
4.4.8 - References [Seite 79]
4.5 - 5 Shareholder Democracy in the Digital Age [Seite 83]
4.5.1 - Shareholder Democracy and Its Discontents [Seite 84]
4.5.2 - Contributions, CEO Perspectives, and an Expanding Role for Investor Relations [Seite 85]
4.5.3 - Online Media, Stakeholder Engagement, and Corporate Governance [Seite 86]
4.5.4 - Shareholder Democracy and Activism Online [Seite 86]
4.5.5 - The Road Ahead for Investor Relations [Seite 88]
4.5.6 - References [Seite 89]
4.6 - 6 Ethics in Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 93]
4.6.1 - Purpose [Seite 93]
4.6.2 - The Rationale for Ethics in FC & IR [Seite 94]
4.6.3 - Types of Stakeholder in FC & IR [Seite 95]
4.6.3.1 - Investors [Seite 95]
4.6.3.2 - Internal Stakeholders: Defining Mission, Vision, and Values [Seite 95]
4.6.3.3 - Social Responsibility Investors [Seite 96]
4.6.3.4 - Finance Industry [Seite 96]
4.6.3.5 - Governing Bodies, Communities, Partners, and Enabling [Seite 97]
4.6.3.6 - Community Relations and Corporate Social Responsibility [Seite 97]
4.6.3.7 - Corporate Social Performance and Stakeholders [Seite 98]
4.6.3.8 - CSR and Stakeholders [Seite 99]
4.6.3.9 - Necessity of Effective CSR to Support FC & IR [Seite 99]
4.6.4 - Principle-Based Ethics: Rational Autonomy and Deontology [Seite 100]
4.6.4.1 - Principle-Based Analyses: Three Ethical Tests [Seite 101]
4.6.5 - Implications of Applying the FC & IR Ethics Model [Seite 102]
4.6.6 - References [Seite 103]
4.7 - 7 Communicative Enactment of Virtue [Seite 109]
4.7.1 - Theoretical Groundwork [Seite 109]
4.7.2 - Enactment of Relationships Through Financial Communication [Seite 110]
4.7.3 - Virtue Ethics [Seite 112]
4.7.4 - Conclusions and Recommendations [Seite 115]
4.7.5 - References [Seite 116]
4.8 - 8 The Skills Required to Be a Successful Investor Relations Officer [Seite 119]
4.8.1 - Convergence of Public Relations and Investor Relations [Seite 119]
4.8.1.1 - The CFOs Expanding Communications Role [Seite 121]
4.8.2 - Other Professionals as IROs [Seite 122]
4.8.2.1 - Sell-Side Analysts as IROs [Seite 122]
4.8.2.2 - Buy-Side Analysts as IROs [Seite 122]
4.8.2.3 - Journalists and Reporters as IROs [Seite 122]
4.8.3 - Attitude, Skill Set, and Experience to Be the Perfect IRO [Seite 123]
4.8.3.1 - Excellent Communicator [Seite 123]
4.8.3.2 - Good Writer and Confident Speaker [Seite 123]
4.8.3.3 - Adequate Financial Knowledge [Seite 123]
4.8.3.4 - Legal Awareness [Seite 124]
4.8.3.5 - Management Skills While Working With Multiple Teams, CEOs, and CFOs [Seite 124]
4.8.3.6 - Understanding of Technology and Digital Platforms [Seite 124]
4.8.3.7 - Knowledge of Peer Companies and Current Events [Seite 124]
4.8.4 - Careers and Education in Investor Relations [Seite 125]
4.8.4.1 - Why Is Investor Relations an Easy and Attractive Profile Change? [Seite 125]
4.8.4.2 - Is Investor Relations a Career Path or a Springboard? [Seite 125]
4.8.4.3 - Entry-Level Roles in Investor Relations [Seite 126]
4.8.4.4 - Lack of Formal Education in Investor Relations [Seite 126]
4.8.5 - Conclusion [Seite 127]
4.8.6 - References [Seite 127]
4.9 - 9 How Shareholders Differ [Seite 129]
4.9.1 - Different Shareholders and Different Perspectives [Seite 130]
4.9.1.1 - Block Institutional Shareholders [Seite 130]
4.9.1.2 - Managerial Shareholders: Executives and Directors [Seite 131]
4.9.1.3 - Foreign Investors vs. Domestics Investors [Seite 131]
4.9.1.4 - State Owners vs. Private Owners [Seite 132]
4.9.1.5 - Family Owners [Seite 133]
4.9.2 - Discussion [Seite 134]
4.9.2.1 - Contributions and Implications [Seite 134]
4.9.2.2 - Future Research Opportunities [Seite 134]
4.9.3 - References [Seite 135]
4.10 - 10 Financial Analysts and Their Role in Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 139]
4.10.1 - Financial Analysts in a Nutshell [Seite 139]
4.10.1.1 - Sell-Side, Buy-Side, and Independent Analysts [Seite 139]
4.10.1.2 - Specialization and Performance [Seite 140]
4.10.1.3 - Regulations and Disclaimers [Seite 141]
4.10.2 - Lone Riders in Teams [Seite 141]
4.10.3 - Part of an Organization [Seite 142]
4.10.4 - Key Players in the Financial Community [Seite 142]
4.10.4.1 - Companies [Seite 142]
4.10.4.2 - Investors [Seite 143]
4.10.4.3 - Rating Agencies [Seite 143]
4.10.4.4 - Media [Seite 144]
4.10.5 - An Integral Part of the Financial Sector [Seite 144]
4.10.6 - Future Matters [Seite 145]
4.10.7 - References [Seite 146]
4.11 - 11 Securities Law for Financial Communication and Investor Relations in the United States, 1929-2016 [Seite 149]
4.11.1 - Background [Seite 149]
4.11.2 - Key Points in the Development of Securities Law [Seite 149]
4.11.2.1 - Securities Act of 1933 and Securities Exchange Act of 1934 [Seite 149]
4.11.2.2 - Regulation Fair Disclosure, 2000 [Seite 150]
4.11.2.3 - Sarbanes-Oxley, 2002 [Seite 151]
4.11.2.4 - Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, 2010 [Seite 153]
4.11.3 - Discussion [Seite 154]
4.11.3.1 - Company Leaders [Seite 155]
4.11.3.2 - Clarifications [Seite 155]
4.11.3.3 - Emerging Technologies [Seite 155]
4.11.3.4 - Activist Investors [Seite 156]
4.11.4 - Conclusion [Seite 156]
4.11.5 - References [Seite 157]
4.12 - 12 Women on Wall Street [Seite 159]
4.12.1 - Literature Review [Seite 160]
4.12.1.1 - d/Discourse and Narratives [Seite 160]
4.12.1.2 - How Metaphors Shape d/Discourse [Seite 160]
4.12.1.3 - The Gendered World of Finance [Seite 161]
4.12.2 - Method [Seite 162]
4.12.3 - Results [Seite 162]
4.12.4 - Discussion [Seite 164]
4.12.5 - Conclusion [Seite 165]
4.12.6 - References [Seite 166]
5 - Part II The Practice of Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 167]
5.1 - 13 Explaining Communication Choices During Equity Offerings [Seite 169]
5.1.1 - Literature Review [Seite 171]
5.1.1.1 - Information Asymmetry [Seite 172]
5.1.1.2 - Disclosure Literature [Seite 173]
5.1.2 - Impression Management and the Equity-Offering Decision [Seite 174]
5.1.2.1 - The Impression Management Hypothesis [Seite 176]
5.1.3 - Conclusion [Seite 177]
5.1.4 - Implications for Future Research [Seite 177]
5.1.5 - References [Seite 177]
5.2 - 14 Financial and Investor Relations for Start-Up Businesses and Emerging Companies [Seite 179]
5.2.1 - Early-Stage Message Strategy [Seite 180]
5.2.2 - Management Responsibility for Early-Stage Investment [Seite 182]
5.2.3 - SEC Regulation and Legal Restraints [Seite 182]
5.2.4 - The Importance of Credibility and Conflict Mediation [Seite 184]
5.2.5 - Tactical Tips and Measurement Approaches [Seite 185]
5.2.6 - Managing Investor Audiences During Growth, and Other Communications Considerations [Seite 185]
5.2.7 - Conclusion [Seite 186]
5.2.8 - References [Seite 186]
5.3 - 15 Whose Hype Matters? [Seite 189]
5.3.1 - Hype: Ill-Defined and Understudied [Seite 190]
5.3.1.1 - Hype and Trigger Events [Seite 190]
5.3.2 - Media Hype in Financial Communications: A New Taxonomy [Seite 191]
5.3.2.1 - Types of Media Hype [Seite 192]
5.3.2.2 - Media Hype and the Impact of Negative Earnings Surprises [Seite 192]
5.3.3 - Methodology [Seite 193]
5.3.3.1 - Variables [Seite 193]
5.3.3.2 - Sample and Data [Seite 194]
5.3.4 - Empirical Findings [Seite 195]
5.3.5 - Conclusion [Seite 196]
5.3.6 - References [Seite 197]
5.4 - 16 Shareholder Activism and the New Role of Investor Relations [Seite 201]
5.4.1 - The Rise of Shareholder Activism [Seite 202]
5.4.2 - A Challenge to Corporate Governance Practices [Seite 203]
5.4.3 - The Role of Investor Relations [Seite 204]
5.4.4 - The Impact of Shareholder Activism on Investor Relations [Seite 204]
5.4.5 - Summary [Seite 206]
5.4.6 - References [Seite 206]
5.5 - 17 Corporate Proxy Contests [Seite 209]
5.5.1 - Mechanics of Proxy Contests and Recent Trends [Seite 210]
5.5.2 - Key Players During Proxy Contests [Seite 211]
5.5.3 - Communication Channels and Tools [Seite 212]
5.5.4 - A Proxy Fight Up Close: Trian vs. DuPont Co. [Seite 213]
5.5.5 - Accessing the Corporate Ballot: Proxy Access [Seite 215]
5.5.6 - Outlook for Contested Corporate Elections [Seite 216]
5.5.7 - References [Seite 217]
5.6 - 18 More Than a Zero-Sum Game [Seite 219]
5.6.1 - Investor Relations: Evolving Perspectives [Seite 219]
5.6.2 - Recognizing the Common Ground Between Investor Relations and Public Relations [Seite 220]
5.6.3 - The Growth of Investor Activism [Seite 221]
5.6.4 - Activism From an Organizational and Public Relations Perspective [Seite 222]
5.6.5 - Looking at Conflict With Adversarial Publics Through the Lens of Game Theory [Seite 222]
5.6.6 - Mondlez International and Activist Investor William Ackman: A Case Study [Seite 223]
5.6.6.1 - Seeking a Balance of Influence [Seite 225]
5.6.6.2 - Playing Strategic Games [Seite 225]
5.6.7 - Common Ground Between Investor Relations and Public Relations in Theory and Practice [Seite 226]
5.6.8 - The Choice for Dissatisfied Investors: To Be an Activist or a "Suggestivist" [Seite 227]
5.6.9 - References [Seite 227]
5.7 - 19 Integrated Reporting [Seite 231]
5.7.1 - Corporate Reporting as an Investor Relations Task [Seite 231]
5.7.1.1 - Investor Relations as a Reporting Function [Seite 231]
5.7.1.2 - The Evolution of Corporate Reporting [Seite 232]
5.7.2 - Integrated Reporting [Seite 233]
5.7.2.1 - Corporate Reporting Beyond Financials [Seite 233]
5.7.2.2 - The Concept of Integrated Reporting [Seite 234]
5.7.2.3 - Implementing Integrated Reporting [Seite 235]
5.7.3 - Summary: Investor Relations and Integrated Reporting [Seite 237]
5.7.4 - References [Seite 238]
5.8 - 20 Corporate Social Responsibility [Seite 243]
5.8.1 - Communicating CSR [Seite 244]
5.8.2 - International Implications [Seite 245]
5.8.3 - Critiques of CSR [Seite 246]
5.8.4 - Implications for Communication and Reputation Management [Seite 247]
5.8.5 - Case Studies [Seite 247]
5.8.5.1 - Global Responsibility Leadership Initiative [Seite 247]
5.8.5.2 - Patagonia and the Blurring of CSR and Activism [Seite 248]
5.8.5.3 - Shareholder Activists and the Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement [Seite 249]
5.8.6 - Conclusion [Seite 250]
5.8.7 - References [Seite 251]
5.9 - 21 Transparency Signaling in Corporate Social Responsibility Press Releases in a Vice Industry [Seite 255]
5.9.1 - Background and Context [Seite 256]
5.9.2 - Literature Review [Seite 256]
5.9.2.1 - The Press Release: A Vital and Dynamic Communication Tactic [Seite 256]
5.9.2.2 - Corporate Social Responsibility [Seite 258]
5.9.2.3 - Communicating CSR [Seite 258]
5.9.3 - Research Questions [Seite 259]
5.9.4 - Methods [Seite 259]
5.9.5 - Results [Seite 261]
5.9.6 - Discussion [Seite 262]
5.9.7 - Limitations and Further Research [Seite 263]
5.9.8 - Conclusion [Seite 263]
5.9.9 - Note [Seite 264]
5.9.10 - References [Seite 264]
5.10 - 22 Faith-Based Investor Activism for Corporate Environmental Responsibility [Seite 267]
5.10.1 - Socially Responsible Investing: A Definition [Seite 268]
5.10.2 - The Rise of Faith-Based Investor Activism [Seite 270]
5.10.3 - Organizational Identity of Religious Groups as Shareholder Environmental Activists [Seite 271]
5.10.4 - Case Study: The Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility [Seite 272]
5.10.5 - Discussion [Seite 277]
5.10.5.1 - One Organizational Identity, Many Organizations [Seite 277]
5.10.5.2 - Religious Investors Demand More Transparency and Communication [Seite 278]
5.10.6 - References [Seite 279]
5.11 - 23 Issues Management in Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 283]
5.11.1 - Historical Challenges of SIM: Shifting Ground and Contestable Matters [Seite 284]
5.11.2 - The Pillars of SIM [Seite 285]
5.11.3 - Historical Challenges of Investor Relations and Financial Communication: Shifting Ground [Seite 287]
5.11.3.1 - SIM and Stock Exchange Regulation [Seite 287]
5.11.4 - Examples of SIM at Work in Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 289]
5.11.4.1 - Strategic Management [Seite 290]
5.11.4.2 - Issues Monitoring [Seite 291]
5.11.4.3 - CSR and Issues of Identification [Seite 292]
5.11.5 - Conclusions [Seite 295]
5.11.6 - References [Seite 295]
5.12 - 24 Measurement and Evaluation of Investor Relations and Financial Communication Activities [Seite 297]
5.12.1 - Measurement and Evaluation: Always the Next Big Thing [Seite 297]
5.12.2 - Levels of Evaluation: The Model [Seite 298]
5.12.3 - Levels of Evaluation: The Case of Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 300]
5.12.3.1 - Investor Relations Officer Level: Output [Seite 300]
5.12.3.2 - Intermediary Level: Outreach [Seite 301]
5.12.3.3 - Target Audience Level: Outcome [Seite 301]
5.12.3.4 - Organizational Results Level: Outgrowth [Seite 302]
5.12.3.5 - Industry Level: Outperform [Seite 302]
5.12.4 - Conclusions [Seite 302]
5.12.5 - References [Seite 303]
5.13 - 25 Perception Audits [Seite 305]
5.13.1 - The Benefits of Conducting a Perception Audit of Investment Community Sentiment [Seite 306]
5.13.2 - Getting Started [Seite 309]
5.13.3 - Planning a Successful Investor Day [Seite 310]
5.13.4 - Conclusion [Seite 314]
5.13.5 - References [Seite 314]
5.14 - 26 Conference Calls [Seite 315]
5.14.1 - ECCs as a Communicative Activity Type [Seite 316]
5.14.1.1 - The Interaction Field of ECCs [Seite 317]
5.14.1.2 - Interaction Scheme of ECCs [Seite 320]
5.14.2 - ECCs and Related Genres in the Discourse System of Financial Communication [Seite 321]
5.14.3 - Historical Evolution and Regional Variations in the ECC Activity Type [Seite 322]
5.14.4 - Informativeness of ECCs [Seite 324]
5.14.5 - Relevance of Expressed Sentiment in ECC Texts [Seite 324]
5.14.6 - The ECC as Dialogue [Seite 325]
5.14.7 - The ECC as Argument [Seite 327]
5.14.8 - Conclusions and Future Research [Seite 327]
5.14.9 - References [Seite 328]
5.15 - 27 When CEOs Talk [Seite 331]
5.15.1 - John Mackeys Actions Challenge Anonymous Speech and Fair Disclosure [Seite 332]
5.15.2 - Netflix CEOs Facebook Post Leads to SEC Changes [Seite 333]
5.15.3 - Google Announces Corporate Restructuring in CEO Blog [Seite 334]
5.15.4 - Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Gets Personal [Seite 335]
5.15.5 - Social Media Amplifies Tinder Executive Interview Misstep [Seite 336]
5.15.6 - Even Facebook Founder Can Be Hacked [Seite 337]
5.15.7 - Lessons for Financial Communicators [Seite 337]
5.15.7.1 - Stay Open, Honest, and Transparent [Seite 337]
5.15.7.2 - Know the Legal and Regulatory Rules [Seite 338]
5.15.7.3 - Find a Personal-Professional Balance [Seite 338]
5.15.7.4 - Secure and Monitor Social Media Accounts [Seite 338]
5.15.8 - Conclusion [Seite 339]
5.15.9 - References [Seite 339]
5.16 - 28 Financial Crisis Management and Wells Fargo [Seite 341]
5.16.1 - Reputation [Seite 341]
5.16.2 - Trust [Seite 342]
5.16.3 - Shareholders vs. Stakeholders [Seite 343]
5.16.4 - Crisis Communication [Seite 343]
5.16.5 - The Case [Seite 344]
5.16.6 - Implications [Seite 345]
5.16.7 - References [Seite 346]
5.17 - 29 Warren Buffett, Value Investing, Media, and Social Media [Seite 349]
5.17.1 - Warren Buffett and Value Investing Principles [Seite 349]
5.17.2 - Buffetts Political and Media Relationships and History [Seite 350]
5.17.3 - Social Network Analysis [Seite 351]
5.17.4 - The Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder Meeting [Seite 351]
5.17.4.1 - The Growth of the Meeting [Seite 352]
5.17.5 - Berkshire Social Media [Seite 352]
5.17.6 - Structural Influence Data in 2015 and 2016 [Seite 354]
5.17.7 - The 2016 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting [Seite 356]
5.17.7.1 - April 25, 2016 [Seite 356]
5.17.7.2 - April 27, 2016 [Seite 356]
5.17.7.3 - April 28, 2016 [Seite 357]
5.17.7.4 - April 30, 2016 [Seite 357]
5.17.7.5 - May 1, 2016 [Seite 357]
5.17.7.6 - May 4, 2016 [Seite 358]
5.17.7.7 - May 5, 2016 [Seite 358]
5.17.7.8 - May 10, 2016 [Seite 359]
5.17.7.9 - May 16, 2016 [Seite 359]
5.17.7.10 - Postscript [Seite 359]
5.17.8 - Buffetts Social Media Impact [Seite 359]
5.17.9 - The Future [Seite 360]
5.17.10 - References [Seite 361]
6 - Part III Financial Communication Outside the Corporate Context [Seite 363]
6.1 - 30 Financial Communications [Seite 365]
6.1.1 - The Federal Reserves Historical Beginnings [Seite 365]
6.1.2 - The Federal Reserve: An Overview [Seite 366]
6.1.3 - A Global Perspective [Seite 367]
6.1.4 - Economic Research and Data [Seite 367]
6.1.5 - An Overview of Monetary Policymaking [Seite 368]
6.1.6 - From the Origin of Mystique to the Seed of Transparency [Seite 369]
6.1.7 - Financial Supervision and Regulation [Seite 370]
6.1.8 - Financial and Economic Education [Seite 371]
6.1.9 - Conclusion [Seite 372]
6.1.10 - Appendix A The Federal Reserve Systems Websites [Seite 372]
6.1.11 - Appendix B Research Centers and Institutes Created by the Reserve Banks [Seite 373]
6.1.11.1 - Center for Indian Country Development at the Minneapolis Reserve Bank [Seite 373]
6.1.11.2 - Center for Pacific Basin Studies at the San Francisco Reserve Bank [Seite 373]
6.1.11.3 - Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics at the Kansas City Reserve Bank [Seite 373]
6.1.11.4 - Community and Economic Development Research Information Center [Seite 373]
6.1.11.5 - Center for the Study of Financial Access for Immigrants [Seite 374]
6.1.11.6 - Center for Human Capital Studies at the Atlanta Reserve Bank [Seite 374]
6.1.11.7 - Center for Microeconomic Data at the New York Reserve Bank [Seite 374]
6.1.11.8 - Consumer Payments Research Center at the Boston Reserve Bank [Seite 375]
6.1.11.9 - Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute at the Dallas Reserve Bank [Seite 375]
6.1.12 - Acknowledgments [Seite 375]
6.1.13 - References [Seite 375]
6.2 - 31 Restoring Legitimacy to Financial Regulators and Institutions [Seite 377]
6.2.1 - Litigation Public Relations and the Outcome of Enforcement Efforts [Seite 378]
6.2.2 - What Is an Admission of Wrongdoing? [Seite 379]
6.2.3 - SEC Settlements and Acknowledgments of Responsibility [Seite 380]
6.2.3.1 - Philip Falcone and Harbinger Capital [Seite 380]
6.2.3.2 - JPMorgan Chase [Seite 381]
6.2.3.3 - Restoring Legitimacy to the SECs Enforcement Authority [Seite 382]
6.2.3.4 - The Department of Justices Use of Acknowledgment of Responsibility [Seite 382]
6.2.4 - Litigation Public Relations Implications for the Acknowledgment of Responsibility [Seite 383]
6.2.5 - Conclusion [Seite 383]
6.2.6 - References [Seite 384]
6.3 - 32 The Privileged Space of Financial Communication [Seite 387]
6.3.1 - Financial Communication and Public Relations [Seite 388]
6.3.1.1 - Financial Journalism: Challenges and Responsibilities [Seite 388]
6.3.1.2 - Journalist-Practitioner Relationships [Seite 389]
6.3.2 - Method [Seite 390]
6.3.3 - Results [Seite 391]
6.3.3.1 - The Friendly Watchdog [Seite 391]
6.3.3.2 - Challenges of Speed and Timing [Seite 392]
6.3.3.3 - Challenges of Complexity [Seite 392]
6.3.3.4 - Challenges of Strategy [Seite 393]
6.3.4 - Discussion [Seite 394]
6.3.4.1 - Practitioner Recommendations [Seite 395]
6.3.4.2 - Limitations and Directions for Future Research [Seite 395]
6.3.5 - Conclusion [Seite 395]
6.3.6 - References [Seite 396]
6.4 - 33 Nonprofit Financial Communication [Seite 399]
6.4.1 - Literature Review [Seite 399]
6.4.1.1 - Theoretical Framework [Seite 399]
6.4.1.2 - Donor Autonomy [Seite 401]
6.4.1.3 - Why Donors Give [Seite 401]
6.4.1.4 - Fundraising Tactics [Seite 402]
6.4.2 - Research Questions [Seite 403]
6.4.3 - Method [Seite 404]
6.4.4 - Results [Seite 404]
6.4.4.1 - Descriptive Statistics [Seite 404]
6.4.4.2 - Research Questions [Seite 404]
6.4.5 - Discussion [Seite 411]
6.4.5.1 - Practical Application [Seite 411]
6.4.5.2 - Limitations and Future Research [Seite 411]
6.4.6 - References [Seite 411]
6.5 - 34 The Sunshine Act [Seite 413]
6.5.1 - A History of Influence [Seite 413]
6.5.1.1 - Pharmaceutical Representatives [Seite 414]
6.5.1.2 - Cause for Concern [Seite 414]
6.5.2 - Reporting Regulation and Transparency [Seite 416]
6.5.2.1 - Physician Payments Sunshine Act [Seite 416]
6.5.2.2 - Managing Expectations [Seite 417]
6.5.2.3 - Beyond Transparency [Seite 418]
6.5.3 - Conclusion [Seite 418]
6.5.4 - References [Seite 419]
6.6 - 35 A Review of Family Financial Communication [Seite 421]
6.6.1 - Parent-Child Interaction About Finances [Seite 421]
6.6.1.1 - Parent-Child Socialization [Seite 421]
6.6.1.2 - Parent-Child Financial Disclosure [Seite 422]
6.6.1.3 - Future Directions in Parent-Child Financial Communication Research [Seite 423]
6.6.2 - Couples' Negotiation of Money [Seite 424]
6.6.2.1 - Couples' Communication About Financial Uncertainty [Seite 424]
6.6.2.2 - Future Directions in Research Into Couples' Negotiation of Finances [Seite 426]
6.6.3 - Conclusion [Seite 427]
6.6.4 - References [Seite 427]
7 - Part IV Financial Communication and Investor Relations Around the World [Seite 431]
7.1 - 36 Consultation and Disclosure for International Financing [Seite 433]
7.1.1 - The Concept of Consultation [Seite 434]
7.1.2 - International Standards for Consultation [Seite 434]
7.1.2.1 - IFC and World Bank Performance Standards [Seite 434]
7.1.2.2 - The Equator Principles [Seite 436]
7.1.3 - Requirements for Consultation With Vulnerable Populations [Seite 437]
7.1.3.1 - Free, Prior, and Informed Consent From Indigenous Peoples [Seite 437]
7.1.3.2 - Gender Aspects of Consultation [Seite 438]
7.1.4 - Communication During Loan Servicing [Seite 439]
7.1.5 - References [Seite 439]
7.2 - 37 The Nordic Approach to Investor Relations [Seite 441]
7.2.1 - Literature Review [Seite 442]
7.2.1.1 - From Numeric Reporting to Strategic Disclosure [Seite 442]
7.2.1.2 - Intangible Assets of Investor Relations: Trust, Reputation, Social Capital, and Expectations [Seite 443]
7.2.1.3 - Telling a Positive Equity Story [Seite 443]
7.2.2 - Studying Investor Relations in the Nordic Context [Seite 444]
7.2.2.1 - Studying Investor Relations Techniques in Voluntary Reporting [Seite 444]
7.2.2.2 - Content Analysis of Presentations of Nordic OMX Companies [Seite 445]
7.2.2.3 - Positive Expressions Through Keyword Analysis [Seite 445]
7.2.2.4 - Analysis of Financial Material [Seite 445]
7.2.3 - Conclusions and Limitations [Seite 447]
7.2.4 - References [Seite 448]
7.3 - 38 Investor Relations in Germany [Seite 451]
7.3.1 - Institutionalization and Professionalization: Fundamentals [Seite 452]
7.3.2 - Development of Investor Relations in Germany [Seite 453]
7.3.2.1 - Forerunner Phase: 1950 to 1985 [Seite 453]
7.3.2.2 - Innovator Phase: 1986 to 1990 [Seite 454]
7.3.2.3 - Familiarity Phase: 1991 to 1995 [Seite 454]
7.3.2.4 - New Economy Phase: 1996 to 2000 [Seite 454]
7.3.2.5 - Professionalization Phase: 2001 to 2007 [Seite 455]
7.3.2.6 - Differentiation Phase: Since 2008 [Seite 455]
7.3.3 - Status Quo: Professional Roles and Types of Investor Relations [Seite 455]
7.3.3.1 - Investor Relations Times Five [Seite 456]
7.3.3.2 - Well-Known Adversaries: Communications vs. Finance [Seite 456]
7.3.3.3 - Investor Relations Plus: The Integrated Function [Seite 458]
7.3.3.4 - Who Am I? Five Types of Investor Relations [Seite 458]
7.3.3.5 - Investor Relations in Germany Today [Seite 458]
7.3.4 - Benefits of a Type Classification [Seite 459]
7.3.5 - Investor Relations Going Forward and Relevance for Other Markets [Seite 462]
7.3.6 - References [Seite 462]
7.4 - 39 The Evolution of Financial Communication in Italy [Seite 465]
7.4.1 - The Importance of Effective Financial Communications for Companies [Seite 465]
7.4.2 - Transparency: A Key Corporate Value [Seite 467]
7.4.3 - Promoting a Virtuous Finance: 52 Years of Oscar di Bilancio [Seite 468]
7.4.4 - The Oscar: An Asset for the Italian Public Relations Community [Seite 470]
7.4.5 - Note [Seite 470]
7.4.6 - References [Seite 470]
7.5 - 40 A Stress Test for Investor Relations and Financial Communication Professionals [Seite 471]
7.5.1 - Contemporary Developments in the Practice of Investor Relations and Financial Communication [Seite 471]
7.5.1.1 - Dynamics of the Trust Variable and the Roles of Other Indicators of the Quality of a Relationship [Seite 472]
7.5.1.2 - How Reputation Fits In [Seite 473]
7.5.1.3 - A Much-Needed Stress Test [Seite 473]
7.5.1.4 - A Different C-Suite Composition [Seite 474]
7.5.2 - A Case Study [Seite 475]
7.5.2.1 - The Configuration of the System [Seite 475]
7.5.2.2 - The Configuration of the Quarterly Report [Seite 476]
7.5.2.3 - Some Examples of Decisions Taken [Seite 476]
7.5.3 - Conclusion [Seite 476]
7.5.4 - References [Seite 477]
7.6 - 41 Investor Relations and Financial Communication in an Emerging Market [Seite 479]
7.6.1 - Historical Background [Seite 479]
7.6.2 - The Origins of Investor Relations in Turkey [Seite 480]
7.6.3 - The Current Situation of Investor Relations in Turkey [Seite 481]
7.6.4 - The Use of Nonfinancial Information in Investor Relations [Seite 482]
7.6.5 - Investor Relations and New Communication Technologies [Seite 483]
7.6.6 - The Turkish Investor Relations Society [Seite 484]
7.6.7 - The Use of Investor Relations for Attracting Foreign Direct Investment to Turkey [Seite 484]
7.6.8 - Conclusion [Seite 485]
7.6.9 - References [Seite 485]
7.7 - 42 Financial Communication in India [Seite 487]
7.7.1 - Brief Profile of India [Seite 488]
7.7.2 - Evolution of the Banking Industry in India [Seite 488]
7.7.3 - Case Study [Seite 489]
7.7.3.1 - The RBI: The Central Conduit of the Indian Economy [Seite 489]
7.7.3.2 - The RBIs Governor: The Answer to India's Economic Struggles [Seite 490]
7.7.3.3 - The Role of Communications at the RBI [Seite 491]
7.7.3.4 - Best Practices [Seite 492]
7.7.4 - Conclusion [Seite 493]
7.7.5 - References [Seite 493]
7.8 - 43 Influences and Priorities in Investor Relations in Australia [Seite 495]
7.8.1 - Influences on Investor Relations Communications Strategy [Seite 496]
7.8.2 - Definition of Investor Relations [Seite 498]
7.8.2.1 - Role of Marketing [Seite 498]
7.8.2.2 - Two-Way Communication [Seite 499]
7.8.3 - Communication Strategy and the Role of the Investment Proposition [Seite 500]
7.8.4 - Investor Relations Officers' Priorities [Seite 501]
7.8.5 - Those Three Initials: ESG [Seite 502]
7.8.6 - Australian Distinctiveness [Seite 503]
7.8.7 - Trends and Challenges [Seite 503]
7.8.8 - Conclusion [Seite 504]
7.8.9 - References [Seite 504]
7.9 - 44 Financial Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 507]
7.9.1 - The Importance of Financial Public Relations [Seite 508]
7.9.2 - Financial Communication in Latin America [Seite 509]
7.9.3 - Comparison With the United States [Seite 510]
7.9.4 - References [Seite 512]
7.10 - 45 Investor Relations in Brazil [Seite 515]
7.10.1 - Governance and Investor Relations in Brazil [Seite 516]
7.10.1.1 - Historical Milestones [Seite 516]
7.10.1.2 - Company Profiles, Listings, Indexes, and Investors [Seite 521]
7.10.2 - The Demand for Communication and Investor Relations [Seite 523]
7.10.3 - Challenges and Opportunities for the Development of Corporate Governance and Investor Relations [Seite 525]
7.10.3.1 - The Internal Context [Seite 525]
7.10.3.2 - Investor Relations [Seite 525]
7.10.3.3 - Communications with the Market [Seite 526]
7.10.4 - Brazilian Case Study: Itaú Unibanco [Seite 526]
7.10.5 - Final Considerations [Seite 527]
7.10.6 - Note [Seite 527]
7.10.7 - References [Seite 527]
8 - Index [Seite 531]
9 - EULA [Seite 541]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

150,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok