Occupational Therapies without Borders - Volume 2

Towards an ecology of occupation-based practices
 
 
Churchill Livingstone Title (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. Oktober 2011
  • |
  • 432 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-7020-4911-8 (ISBN)
 

The companion text to Occupational Therapy without Borders - Volume 1: learning from the spirit of survivors!

In this landmark text writers from around the world discuss a plurality of occupation-based approaches that explicitly acknowledge the full potential of the art and science of occupational therapy. The profession is presented as a political possibilities-based practice, concerned with what matters most to people in real life contexts, generating practice-based evidence to complement evidence-based practice. As these writers demonstrate, occupational therapies are far more than, as some critical views have suggested, a monoculture of practice rooted in Western modernity. Nobel Peace Laureate Desmond Tutu captures the ethos of this book, which essentially calls for engagements in the service of a purpose that is larger than the advancement of our profession's interests: 'Your particular approach to advancing our wellbeing and health strikes me as both unique and easily taken for granted. Whilst you value and work with medical understandings, your main aim seems to go beyond these. You seem to enable people to appreciate more consciously how what we do to and with ourselves and others on a daily basis impacts on our individual and collective wellbeing. As occupational therapists you have a significant contribution to make [.] allowing people from all walks of life to contribute meaningfully to the wellbeing of others.'

  • Links philosophy with practical examples of engaging people in ordinary occupations of daily life as a means of enabling them to transform their own lives
  • Includes contributions from worldwide leaders in occupational therapy research and practice
  • Describes concrete initiatives in under-served and neglected populations
  • Looks at social and political mechanisms that influence people's access to useful and meaningful occupation
  • Chapters increase diversity of contributions - geographically, culturally and politically
  • Emphasis on practice, education and research maintains academic credibility
  • A glossary and practical examples in nearly every chapter make text more accessible to students
  • Englisch
  • London
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • Höhe: 246 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 189 mm
  • |
  • Dicke: 0 mm
  • 6,28 MB
978-0-7020-4911-8 (9780702049118)
0702049115 (0702049115)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Occupational Therapies Without Borders: Volume 2: Towards an Ecology of Occupation-Based Practices
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Foreword I
  • Foreword II
  • References
  • Preface
  • Background to this new volume
  • References
  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of contributors
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: courage to dance politics
  • Tuning into the music of occupational therapy
  • Occupational consciousness
  • Towards an ecology of occupation-based practices
  • Hegemonic practices, sociology of absences and monocultural occupational therapy
  • Sociology of emergences and alternative or counter-hegemonic occupational therapies
  • Courage to dance politics
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Section 1: Discourses without borders
  • Chapter 2: Pecket Learning Community
  • Living with reading, writing, and maths difficulties
  • Who are we? Where did we spring from?
  • `We are adults with a voice and a will to be heard´
  • Arguing for basic education needs
  • The beginning of the process
  • Sowing the seeds
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Meeting the needs for occupational therapy in Gaza
  • Introduction
  • The background to the story
  • The story begins
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Manchester Survivors Poetry and the performance persona Rosie Lugosi
  • Manchester Survivors Poetry
  • The creation of Rosie Lugosi, Lesbian Vampire Queen
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Further viewing
  • Links
  • Chapter 5: Treating adolescent substance abuse through a perspective of occupational cultivation
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Occupational therapy in the social field: concepts andcritical considerations
  • Introduction
  • Considerations on Bourdieu's concepts of field and habitus: implications for the constitution of a social field
  • Marginality, exclusion, apartheid, disaffiliation, and vulnerability: concepts of deprivation
  • Considerations for the development of critical knowledge and practice in the social field
  • References
  • Chapter 7: An ethos that transcends borders
  • Introduction
  • The ethos of occupational therapy
  • Time, place, and circumstance open paths to occupation
  • Occupation fosters dignity, competence, and health
  • Occupational therapy is a personal engagement
  • Caring and helping are vital to the work
  • Effective practice is artistry and science
  • Conclusion: the guiding power of our ethos
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Participatory Occupational Justice Framework (POJF 2010): enabling occupationalparticipation and inclusion
  • Introduction
  • Orienting language and ideas from Western occupational therapy epistemology
  • A participatory occupational justice framework (POJF 2010)
  • Reflections and conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Situated meaning: a matter of cultural safety, inclusion, and occupational therapy
  • Introduction
  • Social constructionism and worldviews
  • Cultural safety
  • Empowering the other
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Spirituality in the lives of marginalized children
  • Introduction
  • The practice of spirit
  • The movement of existence
  • The making of meaning
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: The challenge for occupational therapy in Asia: becoming aninclusive, relevant, andprogressive profession
  • Introduction
  • The impact of occupational therapy's historical roots on its future
  • Sociocultural influences on occupational therapy practice, education, and research
  • Education
  • Research
  • Politics, economics, and occupational therapy
  • Challenges for the future: reflection, innovation, political action
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Influencing social challenges through occupational performance
  • Introduction
  • Evolution of the modified instrumentalism in occupational therapy
  • Assessments
  • Internal and external validity of the MIOT assessments
  • Application of the MIOT framework
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13: (Re)habilitation and (re)positioning the powerful expert and the sick person
  • Introduction
  • Rehabilitation processes engaged by powerful experts with sick people
  • Why policies? Why South African policies?
  • Communication and the RoLA
  • Thinking and the RoLA
  • Labor and the relationship of laboring affinities
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Foucault, power, and professional identities
  • Introduction
  • Foucault: an introduction
  • The relations of discourse, knowledge, and power
  • The normalizing professional discourse: producing the docile therapist
  • Multiple, shifting, and resistive subject positions
  • The reflexive ethical self: a field of possibilities
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Occupational therapists - permanent persuaders in emerging roles?
  • Introduction
  • Vernacular and narrative
  • Contact zones
  • My operation
  • Cultural exchange
  • New intellectual
  • References
  • Section 2: Practices without borders
  • Chapter 16: Rebuilding lives and societies through occupation in post-conflict areas and highly marginalized settings
  • An occupational continuum, from individual trauma to collective rebuilding of civil society
  • Some occupations associated with the acute treatment phase
  • Some occupations associated with the rehabilitation treatment phase
  • Some occupations associated with the social reinsertion phase
  • Some occupations associated with the rebuilding of civil society
  • Concluding thoughts
  • Postscript
  • References
  • Chapter 17: The CETRAM community: building links for social change
  • Introduction
  • Joint care, encountering collective histories
  • Situational Approach: interdisciplinary practice in a real context
  • Community leaders: strengthening grassroots
  • Colectivo Habilitar: `dreaming about the right to be´
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Community publishing: occupational narratives and `local publics´
  • Introduction
  • How can occupational therapists and literacy sponsors facilitate narratives of doing, being, becoming, and belonging? How can these narratives be celebrated?
  • Community publishing engages people in developing the means to express and negotiate occupational goals
  • Practice examples
  • Crossing boundaries/negotiating practice
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Enabling play in the context of rapid social change
  • Introduction
  • Rapid social change and its impact on the narrative of childhood play
  • Rhetorics of play
  • Reminiscing as a starting point to reconnect with the past
  • Reclaiming a relevant rhetoric of play: building bridges between past and present
  • Impact of the play workshops
  • Intergenerational play dissonance: an occupational justice issue
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Natural disasters: challengingoccupational therapists
  • Occupation and occupational therapists: is there a role?
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Ubuntourism: engagingdivided people in postapartheidSouth Africa
  • Introduction
  • Experience 1: Intercontinental Friendly Transkei Lions versus Killester United FC
  • Blending `ubuntu´ and `tourism´: ubuntourism
  • Experience 2: International occupational justice symposium and think tank
  • The journey forward
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Websites
  • Chapter 22: Brazilian experiences in social occupational therapy
  • Introduction
  • Addressing vulnerability and disaffiliation by open settings approaches
  • Culture, conflict, problematization, dialog, and process
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 23: From kites to kitchens: collaborative community-based occupational therapy with refugee survivors of torture
  • Introduction
  • Crossing borderlands - kites and Kovler
  • Legal limbo
  • Seeking refuge
  • Commonplace tasks, uncommon challenges
  • Reconstructing social networks
  • Assessments - adapting the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure
  • Interventions
  • Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • Resources
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Argentina: social participation, activities, and courses of action
  • Background
  • The social situation in Argentina
  • From the hospital to the community
  • In neighborhoods
  • In the community
  • Final comments
  • Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Crossing borders in correctional institutions
  • Introduction
  • Synthesis of occupational therapy programming in corrections
  • The community reintegration project at the Allegheny county jail
  • Washington County Community Corrections
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Occupational apartheid and national parks
  • Introduction
  • Parks, occupation and wilderness
  • Occupations in Shiretoko
  • Occupation, knowledge, and landscape
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 27: The Kawa (river) model: culturally responsiveoccupational therapywithout borders
  • Introduction
  • A sungai (river) flows through rural Malaysia
  • Conclusion
  • A folyo (river) flowing through and beyond Auschwitz
  • A nadi (river) flowing calmly and deeply in Mumbai
  • Summary
  • Aborigine paaka (river) flowing through urban contexts
  • Application of the Kawa model
  • Conclusions
  • Collective occupations flowing powerfully
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 28: Human occupation as a tool for understanding and promoting social justice
  • Introduction
  • The model of human occupation and social injustice
  • Using MOHO to understand the impact of social justice on occupational participation
  • MOHO as a framework for empowerment
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 29: A reflective journey and exploration of the human spirit
  • In the beginning: `Stuck in Nyanga´
  • A change of perspective
  • The background to this setting
  • The interaction
  • Reflections of the process
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 30: PAR FORE: a community-basedoccupational therapy program
  • Introduction
  • The setting
  • Person, context, occupation
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Section 3: Education and research without borders
  • Chapter 31: Eastern European transition countries
  • Introduction
  • ENOTHE
  • Transition countries and social reform
  • The developmental process
  • Establishing partnerships: with whom, when, and why?
  • The second phase in the process of partnering is capacity development
  • Last phase of partnering
  • impact measurement or evaluation
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 32: Empowering learning environments for developing occupational therapy practice in the UK
  • Introduction
  • Practice placement learning as part of occupational therapy education programs
  • Practice learning in voluntary sector placements
  • Integrating learning: the role of supervision and support
  • Empowering learning environments to empower the profession
  • References
  • Chapter 33: Nature of political reasoning as a foundation for engagement
  • Introduction
  • Background to this collaboration
  • The process
  • Themes that emerged
  • Not having the answers - what did we miss?
  • Anxiety - is this process going to be okay for us - are we going to be okay in the end?
  • Experience of vulnerability: safety as a trap
  • Commitment to honesty - building trust
  • Journey of finding our voices
  • Zooming in on the differences
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 34: Research, community-based projects, and teaching as a sharing construction: theMetuia Project in Brazil
  • Introduction
  • Promoting and sustaining teaching of occupational therapy in the social field
  • Integrated research, community-based projects, and teaching
  • Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 35: From altruism to participation: bridging academia andborderlands
  • The call
  • Occupational therapy in the borderlands
  • Expansion of the EKU occupational therapy service mission
  • Expansion of EKU's conception of occupation-based education and service: moving from altruism to participation
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Further reading on Appalachian history and culture
  • References
  • Chapter 36: An occupational justice research perspective
  • Introduction
  • An evolving global context for research and practice
  • The occupational justice perspective on research
  • Areas of focus for occupational justice research
  • Challenges and considerations
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 37: Domestic workers' narratives: transforming occupationaltherapy practice
  • Introduction
  • Problem identification: domestic workers as marginalized
  • Ethnographic data collection with domestic workers
  • The participants' occupational profile
  • Live-in domestic workers' experiences: an occupational perspective
  • Towards equitable work for domestic workers
  • References
  • Chapter 38: Universities and the global change: inclusive communities,gardening, and citizenship
  • Introduction
  • The project
  • Research
  • The results of the research
  • Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 39: An occupational perspective on participatory action research
  • Setting the scene: mental health day services and social inclusion
  • An occupational perspective on research design: the research topic
  • An occupational perspective on research design: participation and occupational form
  • Critical ethnography
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 40: Researching to learn: embracingoccupational justice tounderstand Cambodian childrenand childhoods
  • Part I: Embracing occupational justice
  • Part II: Understanding Cambodian children and childhoods
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 41: Occupational injustice in Pakistani families with disabled children in the UK: a PAR study
  • Pakistani families in the UK with disabled children
  • The need for critical (social) paradigm research
  • Participatory action research
  • Congruence of PAR and occupational therapy
  • The study
  • An occupational science perspective on the findings of this study
  • Occupation and culture
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 42: The occupation of city walking: crossing the invisible line
  • Introduction
  • Review of relevant literature
  • Methods
  • Results and discussion
  • Discussion
  • Limitations
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

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