Marine Impacts of Seawater Desalination

Science, Management, and Policy
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Februar 2019
  • |
  • 194 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-811954-9 (ISBN)
 

Seawater desalination is increasing globally, and in light of this, it is necessary to look at the environmental and ecological impacts of desalination plants on the marine environment. Marine Impacts of Seawater Desalination: Science, Management, and Policy combines existing studies and new research into a unified work describing the interplay of seawater desalination and the marine environment. In particular, the book identifies knowledge gaps in the current data and recommends future research paths. The book also covers the established and emerging desalination processes and the policies and regulations applied to seawater desalination. Marine Impacts of Seawater Desalination is an ideal reference for engineers and developers working on environmental-related issues of seawater desalination, scientists and researchers studying these issues, as well as regulators and decision makers who can use this book as a useful guide for planning and operating desalination plants.

  • A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the environmental impact of seawater desalination on the marine environment.
  • Real-world data demonstrating the environmental effects of seawater desalination.
  • Impact of seawater quality and marine organisms on desalination operations.
  • Discussion of foreseeable future effects and significant areas for further research on seawater desalination.


Dr. Nurit Kress is a Senior Scientist at the Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, the National Institute of Oceanography, Israel. She holds a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Tel Aviv University, an M.A. in Chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin, and a D.Sc. in Chemistry from Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. Dr. Kress' scientific research focuses on marine chemistry and oceanography, investigating both natural and anthropogenic processes using scientific tools common to both areas. The effects of seawater desalination on the marine environment has been her main research topic in the last 10 years.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 19,59 MB
978-0-12-811954-9 (9780128119549)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Marine Impacts of Seawater Desalination: Science, Management, and Policy
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Glossary
  • Salinity (S)
  • Water Types Based on the Amount of Dissolved Solids
  • Units for Plant Capacity
  • Characterization of Desalination Plants by Capacity
  • Installed Capacity vs Actual Production
  • Terminology for Feedwater, Brine, and Product Water
  • Definition of Terms
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • 1.1. A Brief History of Seawater Desalination
  • 1.2. The Water Desalination Market
  • 1.3. The Water-Energy-Food-Ecosystem Nexus
  • 1.4. National and International Water Policy
  • 1.5. Desalinated Water Quality
  • 1.6. The Way Forward
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 2: Desalination Technologies
  • 2.1. General Classification of Desalination Technologies
  • 2.2. Membrane Processes
  • 2.2.1. Pretreatment and Post-treatment
  • 2.2.1.1. Pretreatment
  • 2.2.1.2. Post-treatment
  • 2.2.2. Reverse Osmosis
  • 2.2.3. Electrodialysis and Reverse Electrodialysis
  • 2.2.4. Forward Osmosis and Pressure Retarded Osmosis
  • 2.2.5. Additional Membrane Processes
  • 2.2.5.1. Nanofiltration
  • 2.2.5.2. Pervaporation
  • 2.2.5.3. Membrane Capacitive Deionization
  • 2.3. Thermal Processes
  • 2.3.1. Pretreatment and Post-treatment
  • 2.3.2. Multistage Flash Distillation
  • 2.3.3. Multiple Effect Distillation
  • 2.3.4. Membrane Distillation
  • 2.3.5. Additional Thermal Processes
  • 2.3.5.1. Adsorption Desalination
  • 2.3.5.2. Humidification Dehumidification
  • 2.3.5.3. Freeze Desalination
  • 2.4. Hybrid Systems
  • 2.5. Approaches to Improve Desalination
  • 2.5.1. Membrane Engineering
  • 2.5.2. Zero liquid discharge
  • 2.5.3. Novel Desalination Technologies
  • 2.5.3.1. Microbial Desalination Cell
  • 2.5.3.2. Ion Concentration Polarization
  • 2.5.3.3. Clathrate Hydrates
  • 2.5.4. Renewable Energies for Desalination
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 3: Seawater Quality for Desalination Plants
  • 3.1. Seawater Composition (Excluding Living Organisms)
  • 3.1.1. Dissolved Constituents
  • 3.1.1.1. Major Inorganic Constituents
  • 3.1.1.2. Minor Inorganic Constituents
  • 3.1.1.3. Trace Inorganic Constituents
  • 3.1.1.4. Dissolved Organic Matter
  • 3.1.1.5. Dissolved Gases
  • 3.1.2. Colloids
  • 3.1.3. Particulate Matter
  • 3.2. Marine Habitats
  • 3.2.1. Coastal Habitat
  • 3.2.2. Oceanic Habitat
  • 3.3. Marine Organisms
  • 3.3.1. Plankton
  • 3.3.1.1. Phytoplankton
  • 3.3.1.2. Zooplankton
  • 3.3.1.3. Bacterioplankton and Archaea
  • 3.3.2. Nekton
  • 3.3.3. Benthos
  • 3.3.4. Invasive Alien Species
  • 3.4. Seawater Quality and Marine Organisms Affecting Desalination Operations
  • 3.4.1. Harmful Algal Blooms
  • 3.4.2. Marine Organisms
  • 3.4.3. Seawater Composition
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 4: Theoretical Analysis of the Potential Impacts of Desalination on the Marine Environment
  • 4.1. Intake Systems
  • 4.1.1. Open Water Intakes
  • 4.1.1.1. Surface Open Intakes
  • 4.1.1.2. Submerged Open Intakes
  • 4.1.2. Subsurface Intakes
  • 4.1.2.1. Wells
  • 4.1.2.2. Infiltration Galleries
  • 4.1.3. Potential Environmental Impacts of Feedwater Intake Systems
  • 4.1.3.1. Effect of Entrainment, Impingement, and Entrapment
  • 4.1.3.2. Effects on Local Aquifers
  • 4.1.3.3. Effects of Removal of Biomass and Debris
  • 4.1.3.4. Effect on the Benthic Communities
  • 4.1.4. Mitigation Measures for the Potential Environmental Impacts of Intake Systems
  • 4.1.4.1. Mitigation of EI&E
  • 4.1.4.2. Mitigation of Effects in Local Aquifers
  • 4.1.4.3. Mitigation of Effects From the Removal of Debris and Biomass
  • 4.1.4.4. Mitigation of the Impact on the Benthic Communities
  • 4.2. Outfall Systems
  • 4.2.1. Open Outfall Systems
  • 4.2.2. Submerged Outfall Systems
  • 4.2.3. Potential Environmental Impacts of Outfall Systems
  • 4.2.3.1. Abiotic Impacts
  • 4.2.3.2. Biotic Impacts
  • 4.2.4. Mitigation Measures for the Potential Environmental Impacts of Outfall Systems
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 5: Early Observations of the Impacts of Seawater Desalination on the Marine Environment: From 1960 to 2000
  • 5.1. Impacts Associated With Desalination Using Thermal Processes
  • 5.2. Impacts Associated With Reverse Osmosis Desalination
  • 5.3. Integration of the Early Results
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 6: Actual Impacts of Seawater Desalination on the Marine Environment Reported Since 2001
  • 6.1. In Situ Studies
  • 6.1.1. The Gulf, the Red Sea, and the Gulf of Oman
  • 6.1.1.1. Kuwait
  • 6.1.1.2. United Arab Emirates
  • 6.1.1.3. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • 6.1.1.4. Sultanate of Oman
  • 6.1.1.5. Islamic Republic of Iran
  • 6.1.2. Mediterranean Sea
  • 6.1.2.1. Spain
  • 6.1.2.2. Algeria
  • 6.1.2.3. Israel
  • 6.1.3. Pacific and Indian oceans
  • 6.1.3.1. Australia
  • 6.1.3.2. Chile
  • 6.1.3.3. Taiwan
  • 6.1.4. Atlantic Ocean
  • 6.1.4.1. Spain
  • 6.1.4.2. United States
  • 6.2. In Situ Experiments and Laboratory Bioassays With Natural Local Species
  • 6.2.1. In Situ Experiments
  • 6.2.2. Laboratory Bioassays on Seagrasses (Mediterranean Sea (Spain, Italy)
  • Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico (United State ...
  • 6.2.2.1. Posidonia oceanica
  • 6.2.2.2. Other seagrasses
  • 6.2.3. Laboratory Bioassays With Organisms Other Than Seagrasses
  • 6.3. Toxicity testing
  • 6.4. Critical Evaluation and Integration of Results
  • 6.4.1. Salinity
  • 6.4.2. Temperature
  • 6.4.3. Metals in Sediments
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Chapter 7: Policy and Regulations for Seawater Desalination
  • 7.1. Basic Concepts
  • 7.2. Environmental Legislation
  • 7.2.1. International Conventions and Agreements
  • 7.2.2. Regional Agreements and Treaties
  • 7.2.3. National Legislation and Regulations
  • 7.3. Environmental Impact Assessment
  • 7.4. Modeling
  • 7.4.1. Hydrodynamic Modeling
  • 7.4.1.1. Near-Field Modeling
  • 7.4.1.2. Far-Field Modeling
  • 7.4.2. Biogeochemical Modeling
  • 7.4.3. Ecosystem-Based Modeling
  • 7.4.4. Entrainment Modeling
  • 7.4.5. Risk Assessment and Decision-Making Models
  • 7.4.5.1. Environmental Risk Assessment
  • 7.4.5.2. Decision Making
  • 7.5. Toxicity Testing
  • 7.6. Public Engagement
  • 7.7. Environmental Monitoring
  • References
  • Further Reading
  • Index
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Bitte beachten Sie bei der Verwendung der Lese-Software Adobe Digital Editions: wir empfehlen Ihnen unbedingt nach Installation der Lese-Software diese mit Ihrer persönlichen Adobe-ID zu autorisieren!

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

124,95 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen