Reading and Writing Knowledge in Scientific Communities

Digital Humanities and Knowledge Construction
 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 19. Juli 2017
  • |
  • 188 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-38437-3 (ISBN)
 
Practices associated with the culture of "scholarly" reading have been developed over many centuries and annotations themselves have become the subject of study, either as additional elements in connection with the original texts or as documents in their own right.
The first "scholarly" reading techniques, seen historically from the 12th Century onwards, combine reading and writing in a process known as lettrure, involving both attentive reading and commentary. The Internet has transformed this activity, adding technical layers that relate both to the reading and writing process as well as to the circulation of texts; their potential and effective augmentation, diffusion, and reception.
This book examines digitized reading and writing by focusing primarily on the conditions for the co-construction of scientific knowledge and its augmentation. The authors present numerous examples of studies and personal feedback concerning the intellectual process, open critical spaces, collaborative scholarly publishing, methods for the circulation and mediatization of knowledge, as well as the techniques and tools employed.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 11,43 MB
978-1-119-38437-3 (9781119384373)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Gerald Kembellec, CNAM, France.

Evelyne Broudous, CNAM, France.
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
2 - Half-Title Page [Seite 3]
3 - Title Page [Seite 5]
4 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
5 - Contents [Seite 7]
6 - Acknowledgements [Seite 13]
7 - Foreword: Reading and Writing in NewSystems of Digital Documentality [Seite 15]
8 - 1. Introduction to Scientific Reading and Writing and to Technical Modalities of Augmentation [Seite 21]
8.1 - 1.1. Introduction [Seite 21]
8.2 - 1.2. The digital humanities [Seite 22]
8.2.1 - 1.2.1. Field of practice [Seite 22]
8.2.2 - 1.2.2. A disciplinary movement [Seite 24]
8.3 - 1.3. Notable features of reading and writing [Seite 26]
8.3.1 - 1.3.1. Scientific reading and writing [Seite 26]
8.3.2 - 1.3.2. Ecrilecture: a major concept in the digital humanities [Seite 29]
8.4 - 1.4. Current hypertext technologies [Seite 32]
8.4.1 - 1.4.1. From hypertext to the data web [Seite 32]
8.4.2 - 1.4.2. Specific elements of scientific augmentation: examples [Seite 37]
8.5 - 1.5. Conclusion [Seite 40]
8.6 - 1.6. Bibliography [Seite 40]
9 - 2. Ecrilecture and the Construction of Knowledge within Professional Communities [Seite 43]
9.1 - 2.1. Introduction [Seite 43]
9.2 - 2.2. Ecrilecture and research practices: state of the art [Seite 44]
9.2.1 - 2.2.1. The act of ecrilecture [Seite 44]
9.2.2 - 2.2.2. Writing as a product of ecrilecture [Seite 47]
9.2.3 - 2.2.3. Methodological questions and results [Seite 48]
9.3 - 2.3. Ecrilecture: an informational activity in a professional context [Seite 50]
9.3.1 - 2.3.1. An "invisible" informational practice [Seite 50]
9.3.2 - 2.3.2. Ecrilecture as support for professional activities [Seite 51]
9.4 - 2.4. Ecrilecture: production of an augmented document [Seite 52]
9.4.1 - 2.4.1. Products of ecrilecture [Seite 52]
9.4.2 - 2.4.2. Differences between disciplines and research aims [Seite 53]
9.5 - 2.5. Ecrilecture: a factor in structuring and constructing knowledge [Seite 55]
9.6 - 2.6. Conclusion [Seite 57]
9.7 - 2.7. Bibliography [Seite 58]
10 - 3. "Critical Spaces": A Study of the Necessary Conditions for Scholarly and Multimedia Reading [Seite 63]
10.1 - 3.1. Critical positioning and operations [Seite 64]
10.1.1 - 3.1.1. Writing and spatial structures [Seite 65]
10.1.2 - 3.1.2. The chain of reading [Seite 66]
10.2 - 3.2. The critical mechanism: tensions between material, meaning and space [Seite 70]
10.2.1 - 3.2.1. Technical environment of criticism [Seite 70]
10.2.2 - 3.2.2. Digital materiality [Seite 71]
10.2.3 - 3.2.3. From document to critical space: observations and directions for design [Seite 71]
10.3 - 3.3. Bibliography [Seite 76]
11 - 4. "Annotate the World, and Improve Humanity": Material Imageries in a Web Annotation Program [Seite 79]
11.1 - 4.1. Serving of all humanity: the aims and claims of Hypothes.is [Seite 80]
11.1.1 - 4.1.1. The political implications of "information" [Seite 80]
11.1.2 - 4.1.2. mythologies, ideologies and primitive foundation scenes: from the circle to the network and from the network to the world [Seite 83]
11.1.3 - 4.1.3. Provisional assessment: same ideological basis, different positions [Seite 86]
11.2 - 4.2. Materialized and imaginary visions reformulated through software [Seite 87]
11.2.1 - 4.2.1. Frameworks, signs and actions: values present in the program [Seite 87]
11.2.2 - 4.2.2. Border and visuals [Seite 94]
11.3 - 4.3. Conclusion [Seite 95]
11.4 - 4.4. Bibliography [Seite 95]
12 - 5. Construction of Ecrilecture Standards for Collaborative Transcription of Digitized Heritage [Seite 99]
12.1 - 5.1. Introduction [Seite 99]
12.2 - 5.2. Participatory enrichment of digitized collections: institutional regulation and community ecrilecture practices [Seite 100]
12.2.1 - 5.2.1. Regulation of ecrilecture approaches and institutional criteria [Seite 100]
12.2.2 - 5.2.2. Atomized and community approaches to ecrilecture [Seite 102]
12.3 - 5.3. Providing Internet users with the means for scientific ecrilecture [Seite 103]
12.3.1 - 5.3.1. The herbarium as a means of ecrilecture [Seite 103]
12.3.2 - 5.3.2. The diversity of ecrilecture tools and the emergence of transcription communities [Seite 104]
12.3.3 - 5.3.3. Writing on "Les Herbonautes" [Seite 105]
12.4 - 5.4. Associating human and algorithmic ecrilecture by aggregating concordant transcriptions [Seite 106]
12.4.1 - 5.4.1. Production of standardized transcriptions and algorithmic validation of concordances [Seite 106]
12.4.2 - 5.4.2. Transcription by simple replication: a dominant practice [Seite 108]
12.5 - 5.5. The role of forums in the production of concordant data [Seite 108]
12.5.1 - 5.5.1. Learning the rules for writing a scientific document and the development of transcription conventions [Seite 108]
12.5.2 - 5.5.2. Justified and concerted transcription decissions [Seite 110]
12.6 - 5.6. Re-editorializing transcription traces: consultation of community archives [Seite 112]
12.6.1 - 5.6.1. Production of non-standardized information in discussion spaces [Seite 112]
12.6.2 - 5.6.2. Perspectives for re-editorializing comments [Seite 112]
12.7 - 5.7. Conclusion [Seite 113]
12.8 - 5.8. Bibliography [Seite 114]
13 - 6. The Challenge of Platform Interoperability in Constructing Augmented Knowledge in the Humanities and Social Sciences [Seite 117]
13.1 - 6.1. Introduction [Seite 117]
13.2 - 6.2. Interoperability models for the circulation of documentary metadata [Seite 118]
13.3 - 6.3. Focus and methodology [Seite 121]
13.4 - 6.4. Different levels of interoperability [Seite 123]
13.4.1 - 6.4.1. Organizational interoperability [Seite 123]
13.4.2 - 6.4.2. Technical interoperability [Seite 126]
13.4.3 - 6.4.3. Semantic interoperability [Seite 129]
13.5 - 6.5. Integration and enrichment of metadata in Isidore [Seite 131]
13.6 - 6.6. Conclusion [Seite 132]
13.7 - 6.7. Bibliography [Seite 133]
14 - 7. The XML Portal for the symogih.org Project [Seite 135]
14.1 - 7.1. Introduction [Seite 135]
14.2 - 7.2. The symogih.org project and the interoperability of geohistorical data [Seite 137]
14.2.1 - 7.2.1. Collaborative management of geohistorical data [Seite 137]
14.2.2 - 7.2.2. From generic relational model to interoperable ontology [Seite 139]
14.3 - 7.3. Editorialization procedures [Seite 142]
14.3.1 - 7.3.1. Platform architecture and text annotation [Seite 142]
14.3.2 - 7.3.2. Specific aspects of the Michon and Galileo projects [Seite 145]
14.3.3 - 7.3.3. Features of the XML portal [Seite 147]
14.4 - 7.4. Discussion [Seite 150]
14.5 - 7.5. Conclusion [Seite 152]
14.6 - 7.6. Bibliography [Seite 152]
15 - 8. Issues of "Hypermediating Journals" for Scientific Publishing [Seite 155]
15.1 - 8.1. Introduction [Seite 155]
15.2 - 8.2. Digital technology and the transformation of scientific journals [Seite 157]
15.3 - 8.3. The concept of hypermediating journals: the COSSI case [Seite 162]
15.4 - 8.4. The role of the tagger in the ecrilecture process [Seite 168]
15.5 - 8.5. Conclusion [Seite 170]
15.6 - 8.6. Bibliography [Seite 172]
16 - List of Authors [Seite 177]
17 - Index [Seite 179]
18 - Other titles from iSTEinInformation Systems, Web and Pervasive Computing [Seite 183]
19 - EULA [Seite 191]

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