Mechanisms of Vascular Defects in Diabetes Mellitus

 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 1. August 2017
  • |
  • XVIII, 579 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
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978-3-319-60324-7 (ISBN)
 
This book intends to bring together, a panel of renowned experts in the field of vascular biology and diabetology, to integrate the current understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of vascular diseases in diabetes mellitus. This attempt is significant given the increasing interest in this area as the prevalence of vascular diseases continues to escalate globally. Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of structural and functional changes in all vessel walls of the human body. Vascular complications of diabetes are leading causes for both morbidity and mortality.
In recent years, several articles have focused on advancing our knowledge on the profound effect of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance on building up vascular wall inflammation leading to endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus Other reports have elaborated on the various disorders, hyperglycemia can lead to, their therapies, adverse effects and complications. There are also studies that highlight the role of factors that induce vascular wall alterations in hyperglycemia.
In this book, we attempt to discuss vascular disease progression in diabetes with a unique approach. We attempt to provide a complete perspective of the pathophysiology of vascular complications and then dissect each of the factors that play a key role in accelerating vascular wall alterations in diabetes. Each of these factors has been adversely implicated in the initiation and progression of disease to a large extent. In this collection for the first time all these factors would be described under a common canopy. Further, the text would emphasize on pathogenesis of micro vascular complications of diabetes, such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy. Pharmacological therapies for treating vascular dysfunction in diabetes mellitus would also be reviewed. This compendium hopefully would be an invaluable replacement to scores of literature on diabetic vascular disease and would be of great interest to clinicians, academicians, medical students and researchers.
The book will be divided into seven sections, each emphasizing a common incentive to development of vascular disease in diabetes. Section I deals with pathophysiology of diabetic vascular disease, beginning with an update on the global burden of diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. The pathophysiology and pathogenesis of diabetes associated macrovasculopathy, how hyperglycemia functions as an atherogenic factor, effects of hyperglycemia on smooth muscle accumulation in vascular lesions and genetic susceptibility for increased risk of vascular disease in diabetes will be discussed in the following chapters of this section.
The next section (Section II) surveys the process of endothelial dysfunction under hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia and their effects on angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and wound healing. A chapter is also dedicated to the endothelial progenitor cell population and its dysfunction during development of vascular complications in diabetes.
Section III will highlight the molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction, various pathways such as nitric oxide synthase pathway, oxidative stress pathway, renin - angiotensin system and increased vascular superoxide production in the initiation and progression of vascular disease in diabetes. This section also covers role of endothelin, monocyte derived cytokines, peroxynitrate and adipokines in macrovascular complications of diabetes.
Metabolic factors such as advanced glycation end products, atherogenic dyslipoproteinaemia, and homocysteine will be reviewed in Section IV, whereas an overview of the hemostatic factors such as platelet dysfunction, hyperglycaemia induced thrombin formation and aberrant clot lysis will be dwelled upon in Section V.Section VI includes chapters on microvascular complications of diabetes which encompasses long term complications of diabetes affecting small blood vessels of the eye, kidneys and nervous system. The pathogenesis and mechanisms of these complications would be detailed here.
The final section (Section VII) of the book will consider mechanism of action of drugs for treating endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus which would elaborate on lipid regulating therapies such as statins, as well as other therapies such as ACE inhibitors, Angiotensin II receptors, insulin, metformin and their effects on enhancing vascular function in diabetes.<We intend to invite authors who symbolize a multidisciplinary approach to this complicated disease. The proposed authors include clinicians who understand the trend of vascular complications in their long term clientele, epidemiologists with a holistic view, basic and experimental researchers with years of experience in dissecting the factors leading to endothelial dysfunction and clinical researchers with the skill of translating bench work to the bedside. We expect this book will be of significant value and interest to the same group of clinicians, researchers, post doctoral fellows and medical and non medical graduate students. The novel assimilated insights could stimulate development of mechanism based prevention and therapeutic strategies providing a promising option to limit cardiovascular complications in diabetes mellitus.
1st ed. 2017
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • 54 farbige Abbildungen, 21 s/w Abbildungen
  • |
  • 21 schwarz-weiße und 54 farbige Abbildungen, Bibliographie
  • 14,04 MB
978-3-319-60324-7 (9783319603247)
10.1007/978-3-319-60324-7
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Dr. Chandrasekharan C. Kartha is an Honorary Distinguished Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes Biology at Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology at Thiruvananthapuram, India. He is a pathologist by training and has made significant contributions to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of vascular diseases and endomyocardial fibrosis, a tropical cardiomyopathy. He is an elected fellow of Royal College of Physicians (London), International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Academy of Medical Sciences (India) National Academy of Sciences (India) and Indian Academy of sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of several journals and in grant review committees of several India government agencies funding medical research and science and technology activities. He has organized several national and international conferences on cardiovascular themes and has been an invited speaker at several national and international meetings. He has published more than 120 papers in refereed journals, 15 chapters in books and edited 5 books. He is the current President of Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences, the India section of International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences.

SECTION I: Pathophysiology

Chapter 1. The global burden of diabetes and its vascular complications

Dr V. Mohan

Madras Diabetes Research Foundation

No 4, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai - 600 086

India

Email: drmohans@diabetes.ind.in



Chapter 2. Diabetes-associated macrovasculopathy: pathophysiology and pathogenesis



School of Medical Sciences

University Sains Malaysia

Kelantan

Malaysia

Email: seempi2005@yahoo.co.uk



Chapter 3. Diabetes as an atherogenic factor

Dr Sampath Parthasarathy

Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences

UCF College of Medicine

6900 Lake Nona Blvd.<

Orlando

Fl 32827

USA

Email: spartha@ucf.edu



Chapter 4. Effects of diabetes on smooth muscle accumulation in lesions of atherosclerosis

Dr L.A. Suzuki

Department of Pathology

University of Washington

Seattle 98195-7470

USA

Email:



Chapter 5. Genetic basis for increased risk for vascular disease in diabetes

Dr Adebowale Adeyemo

Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health Bethesda

MD

USA

Email: adeyemoa@mail.nih.gov



SECTION II: Endothelial dysfunction and diabetes

Chapter 6. The role of hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia in causing vascular dysfunction in diabetes

Dr Cristina M. Sena

Institute of Physiology

Faculty of Medicine

University of Coimbra

3000-548 Coimbra

Portugal

Email: csena@ci.uc.pt



Chapter 7. Endothelial dysfunction in hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia

Professor Madhulika Dixit

Department of Biotechnology

Indian Institute of Technology Madras

Chennai - 600 036

India

Email: mdixit@iitm·ac·in



Chapter 8. Endothelial dysfunction and diabetes: Effects on angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and wound healing

Dr Gopi Krishna Kolluru

Department of Pathology

LSU Health Sciences Center-Shreveport

1501 Kings Highway

LA 71130

USA

Email:



Chapter 9. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of vascular complications of diabetes

Dr Adriana Georgescu

Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology 'NicolaeSimionescu' of Romanian Academy

8,B.P.Hasdeu Street

PO Box 35-14

Bucharest

Romania

Email: adriana.georgescu@ icbp.ro<

SECTION III: Molecular mechanisms

Chapter 10. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in diabetes mellitus

Professor Piruthivi Sukumar

Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering

Indian Institute of Technology

Guwahati

Assam - 781039

India

Email: p.sukumar@iitg.ernet.in



Chapter 11. Nitric oxide synthase pathway in diabetes mellitus

Dr Tomoko Asagami

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Stanford University School of Medicine

291 Campus Drive Li Ka Shing Building

Stanford

CA 94305-5101

USA

Email:



Chapter 12. The role of endothelin in diabetic vascular complications

Dr T. Matsumoto

Department of Physiology and Morphology

Institute of Medicinal Chemistry

Hoshi University< Shinagawa-ku

Tokyo 142-8501

Japan

Email: t-matsu@hoshi.ac.jp



Chapter 13. Oxidative stress and diabetic vascular complications

Dr Atsunori Kashiwagi

Shiga University of Medical Science

Otsu

Shiga

Japan

Email: kasiwagi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp



Chapter 14. Mechanisms of increased vascular superoxide production in human diabetes mellitus

Professor Tomasz Guzik

Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences

University of Glasgow

Glasgow

G12 8QQ

UK

Email: Tomasz.Guzik@glasgow.ac.uk



Chapter 15. Peroxynitrite and vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

Dr Azza B. El-Remessy

College of Pharmacy

Medical College of Georgia

The University of Georgia

Augusta

GA 30912





Chapter 16. Monocyte derived cytokines and pathogenesis of vascular lesions in diabetes

Dr Surya Ramachandran

Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology

Thycaud Post

Poojappura Thiruvananthapuram - 695 014 Kerala

India

Email: suryaramachandran@rgcb.res.in



Chapter 17. The renin-angiotensin system and the long-term complications of diabetes

Professor Jennifer Wilkinson Berka

Department of Immunology, Monash Medical School Building

Level 5, The Alfred Centre

Monash University

Melbourne

VIC 3004

Australia

Email: jennifer.wilkinson-berka@monash.edu



Chapter 18. Adipokines and vascular disease in diabetes

Professor Camille de Moura Balarini

Bioitechnology Center

Federal University of Paraiba< Joao Pessoa

Brazil

Email:



SECTION IV: Metabolic factors

Chapter 19. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic complications

Professor Mark E. Cooper

Albert Einstein Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Centre for Diabetes Complications Diabetes and Metabolism Division

Baker Medical Research Institute

P.O. Box 6492

St. Kilda Road Central

Melbourne

Victoria 8008

Australia

Email: mark.cooper@baker.edu.au



Chapter 20. Atherogenicdyslipoproteinemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus

Professor Rafael Carmena

Department of Medicine and Endocrinology

University of Valencia

Valencia E-46010

Spain

Email: Rafael.Carmena@uv.es







Chapter 21. Homocysteine and diabetic vasculopathy

Professor Martin Buysschaert< Service d'EndocrinologieetNutri-tion

CliniquesUniversitaires St. Luc

Avenue Hippocrate 54

UCL 54.74

B-1200 Bruxelles

Belgium

Email : martin.buysschaert@uclouvain.be



SECTION V: Hemostatic factors

Chapter 22. Diabetes as a prothrombotic condition

Professor Peter Grant

Academic Unit of Molecular Vascular Medicine

Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics

Faculty of Medicine and Health

University of Leeds

Clarendon Way

Leeds

LS1 3EX

UK

Email: P.J.Grant@leeds.ac.uk



Chapter 23. Platelet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes

Professor Dominick J. Angiolillo

Division of Cardiology

University of Florida-Jacksonville

5th Floor, Ambulatory Care Center 655 West 8th Street, C35

Jacksonville

FL 32209 USA

Email: dominick.angiolillo@jax.ufl.edu



Chapter 24. Hyperglycemia-induced thrombin formation in diabetes

Professor Anetta Undas

Institute of Cardiology

Jagiellonian University Medical College

80 Pradnicka Street

31-202 Krakow

Poland

Email: mmundas@cyf-kr.edu.pl



Chapter 25. Mechanisms for aberrant clot lysis in diabetic subjects

Dr E.J. Dunn

Academic Unit of Molecular Vascular Medicine

Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics

Faculty of Medicine and Health

University of Leeds

Clarendon Way

Leeds

LS1 3EX

UK

Email:



SECTION VI: Diabetic microvasculopathy

Chapter 26. Diabetes and retinal vascular disorders

Dr Jennifer Wilkinson-Berka

Department of Immunology

Monash University

AMREP Alfred Centre

Melbourne

Victoria 3004

Australia

Email: jennifer.wilkinson-berka@monash.edu



Chapter 27. Pericytes and the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy

Professor Hans Peter Hammes

5th Medical Department

University Hospital Mannheim

University of Heidelberg

Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3

68167 Mannheim

Germany

Email: peter.hammes@med5.ma.uni-heidelberg.de



Chapter 28. Mechanisms of microvascular damage in human diabetic neuropathy

Dr Peter J. Dyck

Department of Neurology

Mayo Clinic

Rochester

MN 55905

USA

Email: Peter@mayo.edu



Chapter 29. Pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy

Dr Stephanie Toth-Manikowski

Division of Nephrology

Johns Hopkins University

1830 E. Monument Street Suite 416

Baltimore

MD 21287

USA

Email: stephanie.toth-manikowski@bmc.org



SECTION VII: Pharmacological therapies

Chapter 30. Mechanisms of action of drugs for treating endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

Dr Sanjay K Banerjee

Translational Health Science & Technology Institute

NCR Biotech Science Cluster, 3rd Milestone, Faridabad - Gurgaon Expressway, PO box #04, Faridabad - 121001

India

Email: skbanerjee@thsti.res.in

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