Critique of Judgement

 
 
Digireads.com Publishing
  • erschienen am 1. Januar 2010
  • |
  • 246 Seiten
 
E-Book
978-1-4209-0580-9 (ISBN)
 
German philosopher and significant 18th century late Enlightenment thinker Immanuel Kant wrote "Critique of Judgment" in 1790 to solidify his ideas on aesthetics. Divided into two sections, one on aesthetic judgment and the other on teleological judgment, "Critique" proceeds to analyze the human experience of the beautiful and the sublime. From the effect of art and nature to the role of imagination, from objectivity of taste to the limits of representation, Kant investigates a myriad of factors that determine aesthetics. He continues with the connection of aesthetic with morality, disinterestedness, and originality, and consistently bears in mind the interests of reason in his writing. Kant ultimately had a profound impact on the artists, authors, and other philosophers of both the classical and romantic periods, establishing in "Critique" a milestone in critical theory and philosophy.
  • Englisch
  • Stilwell
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  • USA
Neeland Media LLC
978-1-4209-0580-9 (9781420905809)
1420905805 (1420905805)
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  • Title page
  • EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION
  • GLOSSARY OF KANT'S PHILOSOPHICAL TERMS
  • PREFACE
  • INTRODUCTION
  • I. OF THE DIVISION OF PHILOSOPHY
  • II. OF THE REALM OF PHILOSOPHY IN GENERAL
  • III. OF THE CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT AS A MEANS OF COMBINING THE TWO PARTS OF PHILOSOPHY INTO A WHOLE.
  • IV. OF JUDGEMENT AS A FACULTY LEGISLATING A PRIORI
  • V. THE PRINCIPLE OF THE FORMAL PURPOSIVENESS OF NATURE IS A TRANSCENDENTAL PRINCIPLE OF JUDGEMENT.
  • VI. OF THE COMBINATION OF THE FEELING OF PLEASURE WITH THE CONCEPT OF THE PURPOSIVENESS OF NATURE.
  • VII. OF THE AESTHETICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE PURPOSIVENESS OF NATURE.
  • VIII. OF THE LOGICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE PURPOSIVENESS OF NATURE
  • IX. OF THE CONNEXION OF THE LEGISLATION OF UNDERSTANDING WITH THAT OF REASON BY MEANS OF THE JUDGEMENT
  • PART I. CRITIQUE OF THE AESTHETICAL JUDGEMENT
  • FIRST DIVISION. ANALYTIC OF THE AESTHETICAL JUDGEMENT
  • FIRST BOOK. ANALYTIC OF THE BEAUTIFUL
  • FIRST MOMENT. OF THE JUDGEMENT OF TASTE ACCORDING TO QUALITY
  • § 1. The judgement of taste is aesthetical
  • § 2. The satisfaction which determines the judgement of taste is disinterested
  • § 3. The satisfaction in the PLEASANT is bound up with interest
  • § 4. The satisfaction in the GOOD is bound up with interest
  • § 5. Comparison of the three specifically different kinds of satisfaction
  • EXPLANATION OF THE BEAUTIFUL RESULTING FROM THE FIRST MOMENT
  • SECOND MOMENT. OF THE JUDGEMENT OF TASTE, VIZ. ACCORDING TO QUANTITY
  • § 6. The beautiful is that which apart from concepts is represented as the object of a universal satisfaction
  • § 7. Comparison of the Beautiful with the Pleasant and the Good by means of the above characteristic
  • § 8. The universality of the satisfaction is represented in a judgement of Taste only as subjective
  • § 9. Investigation of the question whether in the judgement of taste the feeling of pleasure precedes or follows the judging of the object
  • EXPLANATION OF THE BEAUTIFUL RESULTING FROM THE SECOND MOMENT
  • THIRD MOMENT. OF JUDGEMENTS OF TASTE, ACCORDING TO THE RELATION OF THE PURPOSES WHICH ARE BROUGHT INTO CONSIDERATION THEREIN.
  • § 10. Of purposiveness in general
  • § 11. The judgement of taste has nothing at its basis but the form of the purposiveness of an object (or of its mode of representation)
  • § 12. The judgement of taste rests on a priori grounds
  • § 13. The pure judgement of taste is independent of charm and emotion
  • § 14. Elucidation by means of examples
  • § 15. The judgement of taste is quite independent of the concept of perfection
  • § 16. The judgement of taste, by which an object is declared to be beautiful under the condition of a definite concept, is not pure
  • § 17. Of the Ideal of beauty
  • EXPLANATION OF THE BEAUTIFUL DERIVED FROM THIS THIRD MOMENT
  • FOURTH MOMENT. OF THE JUDGEMENT OF TASTE, ACCORDING TO THE MODALITY OF THE SATISFACTION IN THE OBJECT
  • § 18. What the modality in a judgement of taste is
  • § 19. The subjective necessity, which we ascribe to the judgement of taste, is conditioned
  • § 20. The condition of necessity which a judgement of taste asserts is the Idea of a common sense
  • § 21. Have we ground for presupposing a common sense?
  • § 22. The necessity of the universal agreement that is thought in a judgement of taste is a subjective necessity, which is represented as objective under the presupposition of a common sense
  • EXPLANATION OF THE BEAUTIFUL RESULTING FROM THE FOURTH MOMENT
  • GENERAL REMARK ON THE FIRST SECTION OF THE ANALYTIC
  • SECOND BOOK. ANALYTIC OF THE SUBLIME
  • § 23. Transition from the faculty which judges of the Beautiful to that which judges of the Sublime
  • § 24. Of the divisions of an investigation into the feeling of the sublime
  • A.-Of the Mathematically Sublime
  • § 25. Explanation of the term "sublime
  • § 26. Of that estimation of the magnitude of natural things which is requisite for the Idea of the Sublime
  • § 27. Of the quality of the satisfaction in our judgements upon the Sublime
  • B.-Of the Dynamically Sublime in Nature
  • § 28. Of Nature regarded as Might
  • § 29. Of the modality of the judgement upon the sublime in nature
  • GENERAL REMARK UPON THE EXPOSITION OF THE AESTHETICAL REFLECTIVE JUDGEMENT
  • DEDUCTION OF [PURE ] AESTHETICAL JUDGEMENTS
  • § 30. The Deduction of aesthetical judgements on the objects of nature must not be directed to what we call Sublime in nature, but only to the Beautiful.
  • § 31. Of the method of deduction of judgements of Taste
  • § 32. First peculiarity of the judgement of Taste
  • § 33. Second peculiarity of the judgement of Taste
  • § 34. There is no objective principle of Taste possible
  • § 35. The principle of Taste is the subjective principle of Judgement in general
  • § 36. Of the problem of a Deduction of judgements of Taste
  • § 37. What is properly asserted a priori of an object in a judgement of Taste
  • § 38. Deduction of judgements of Taste
  • § 39. Of the communicability of a Sensation
  • § 40. Of Taste as a kind of sensus communis
  • § 41. Of the empirical interest in the Beautiful
  • § 42. Of the intellectual interest in the Beautiful
  • § 43. Of Art in general
  • § 44. Of beautiful Art
  • § 45. Beautiful Art is an art, in so far as it seems like nature
  • § 46. Beautiful Art is the art of genius
  • § 47. Elucidation and confirmation of the above explanation of Genius
  • § 48. Of the relation of Genius to Taste
  • § 49. Of the faculties of the mind that constitute Genius
  • § 50. Of the combination of Taste with Genius in the products of beautiful Art
  • § 51. Of the division of the beautiful arts
  • § 52. Of the combination of beautiful arts in one and the same product
  • § 53. Comparison of the respective aesthetical worth of the beautiful arts
  • § 54. Remark
  • SECOND DIVISION. DIALECTIC OF THE AESTHETICAL JUDGEMENT
  • § 55
  • § 56. Representation of the antinomy of Taste
  • § 57. Solution of the antinomy of Taste
  • § 58. Of the Idealism of the purposiveness of both Nature and Art as the unique principle of the aesthetical Judgement.
  • § 59. Of Beauty as the symbol of Morality
  • § 60. APPENDIX: Of the method of Taste
  • PART II. CRITIQUE OF THE TELEOLOGICAL JUDGEMENT
  • § 61. Of the objective purposiveness of Nature
  • FIRST DIVISION. ANALYTIC OF THE TELEOLOGICAL JUDGEMENT
  • § 62. Of the objective purposiveness which is merely formal as distinguished from that which is material
  • § 63. Of the relative, as distinguished from the inner, purposiveness of nature
  • § 64. Of the peculiar character of things as natural purposes
  • § 65. Things regarded as natural purposes are organised beings
  • § 66. Of the principle of judging of internal purposiveness in organised beings
  • § 67. Of the principle of the teleological judging of nature in general as a system of purposes
  • § 68. Of the principle of Teleology as internal principle of natural science
  • SECOND DIVISION. DIALECTIC OF THE TELEOLOGICAL JUDGEMENT
  • § 69. What is an antinomy of the Judgement?
  • § 70. Representation of this antinomy
  • § 71. Preliminary to the solution of the above antinomy
  • § 72. Of the different systems which deal with the purposiveness of nature
  • § 73. None of the above systems give what they pretend
  • § 74. The reason that we cannot treat the concept of a Technic of nature dogmatically is the fact that a natural purpose is inexplicable
  • § 75. The concept of an objective purposiveness of nature is a critical principle of Reason for the reflective Judgement
  • § 76. Remark
  • § 77. Of the peculiarity of the human Understanding, by means of which the concept of a natural purpose is possible
  • § 78. Of the union of the principle of the universal mechanism of matter with the teleological principle in the Technic of nature.
  • METHODOLOGY OF THE TELEOLOGICAL JUDGEMENT.
  • § 79. Whether teleology must be treated as if it belonged to the doctrine of nature
  • § 80. Of the necessary subordination of the mechanical to the teleological principle in the explanation of a thing as a natural purpose.
  • § 81. Of the association of mechanism with the teleological principle in the explanation of a natural purpose as a natural product.
  • § 82. Of the teleological system in the external relations of organised beings
  • § 83. Of the ultimate purpose of nature as a teleological system
  • § 84. Of the final purpose of the existence of a world, i.e. of creation itself
  • § 85. Of Physico-theology
  • § 86. Of Ethico-theology
  • § 87. Of the moral proof of the Being of God
  • § 88. Limitation of the validity of the moral proof
  • § 89. Of the use of the moral argument
  • § 90. Of the kind of belief in a teleological proof of the Being of God
  • § 91. Of the kind of belief produced by a practical faith

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