Mechanisms of Sensory Working Memory

Attention and Perfomance XXV
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 17. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 312 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-811043-0 (ISBN)
 

Mechanisms of Sensory Working Memory: Attention and Performance XXV provides an update on research surrounding the memory processes that are crucial for many facets of cognitive processing and experience, with new coverage of emerging areas of study, including a new understanding of working memory for features of stimuli devoid of verbal, phonological, or long-term memory content, such as memory for simple visual features (e.g., texture or color), simple auditory features (e.g., pitch), or simple tactile features (e.g., vibration frequency), now called sensory memory to distinguish from verbal memory.

This contemporary focus on sensory memory is just beginning, and this collection of original contributions provides a foundational reference for the study mechanisms of sensory memory. Students, scholars, and researchers studying memory mechanisms and processes in cognitive neuroscience, cognitive science, neuroscience, and psychology will find this book of great value to their work.


  • Introduces the study of sensory mechanisms of working memory as distinct from verbal memory
  • Covers visual memory, auditory memory, and tactile memory
  • Includes translational content as the breakdown of working memory is often associated with a disease, disorder, or trauma to the brain
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 9,08 MB
978-0-12-811043-0 (9780128110430)
0128110430 (0128110430)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Mechanisms of Sensory Working Memory
  • MECHANISMS OF SENSORY WORKING MEMORY: ATTENTION AND PERFORMANCE XXV
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Attention and Performance XXV
  • SAINT-HIPPOLYTE, QC, JULY 2013
  • 1 - Introduction
  • References
  • 2 - Sensational Memorability: Working Memory for Things We See, Hear, Feel, or Somehow Sense
  • INTRODUCTION
  • IS THERE A SENSORY WORKING MEMORY?
  • Sensory Memory Definition
  • Capacity Limits for Sensory Memory?
  • Working Memory Definition
  • Is Sensory Working Memory Veridical?
  • REVIEW OF SENSORY MEMORY RESEARCH
  • A Unifying Modeling Framework
  • Progression of Models
  • Phases of Working Memory Information, Both Sensory and Abstract
  • Brief Sensory Afterimages
  • Processed Sensory Recollection
  • Evidence of Two Phases of Sensory Memory
  • Nature of the Longer Store
  • Constructed Abstract Units
  • Characteristics of Abstract Working Memory 1: Capacity Limits of Abstract Memory
  • Characteristics of Abstract Working Memory 2: The Distinction from Sensory Memory
  • Tradeoffs between Sensory Modalities
  • CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 3 - The Brain Mechanisms of Working Memory: An Evolving Story
  • WORKING MEMORY: FUNDAMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS
  • WORKING MEMORY: THEORETICAL MODELS
  • WORKING MEMORY: NEURAL BASIS
  • SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODELS OF VISUAL WM
  • ATTENTION AND WM
  • A SINGLE OR SEVERAL CAPACITY-LIMITED STORES?
  • WHERE ARE THE SENSORY WM REPRESENTATIONS STORED?
  • WHAT ARE THE PARIETAL AND PREFRONTAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO VWM?
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 4 - The Contribution of Human Superior Intraparietal Sulcus to Visual Short-Term Memory and Perception
  • INTRODUCTION
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS
  • Participants
  • Experimental Design
  • Main Experiments
  • Superior IPS Localizer
  • Inferior IPS/Lateral Occipital (LO) Localizer
  • fMRI Methods
  • Data Analysis
  • RESULTS
  • DISCUSSION
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 5 - Neural Bases of the Short-term Retention of Visual Information
  • PREAMBLE: DEFINING CONCEPTS AND TERMINOLOGY
  • Short-term Retention (STR) versus Short-term Memory (STM) versus Working Memory (WM)
  • Theoretical Bases for the STM-WM Distinction
  • Neurobiological Bases for the STM-WM Distinction
  • The Role of PFC in the Control of Interference on Tests of STM and WM
  • THE NEUROANATOMICAL BASES OF THE STR OF VISUAL INFORMATION
  • Evidence from Lesions and Stimulation Experiments
  • Evidence from Multivariate Analyses of fMRI Data
  • THE NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL BASES OF WORKING MEMORY
  • Rate Coding Models
  • Dynamic and Distributed Coding in the PFC Supports WM Performance
  • THE NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL BASES OF THE STR OF VISUAL INFORMATION
  • Distributed Patterns of Activity in Sensory Cortex
  • Does the STR of Sensory Information Fundamentally Depend on a Weight-Based Scheme?
  • CONCLUSION
  • Future Research
  • References
  • 6 - What are the Roles of Sensory and Parietal Activity in Visual Short-Term Memory?
  • INTRODUCTION
  • EVIDENCE FOR A FIXED CAPACITY OF VSTM
  • Behavioral Evidence
  • fMRI Evidence
  • Evidence from Electrophysiology
  • CHALLENGES TO THE INTEGRATED FIXED-CAPACITY MODEL
  • Flexible-Resource Models
  • Sensory Representation of VSTM Stimuli
  • UPDATING THE CLASSIC MODEL OF VSTM
  • Evidence for a Sensory Account of VSTM Precision
  • REEVALUATING IPS ACTIVITY AND THE SPCN
  • Integrating Precision Models with Sustained Parietal Activity
  • An Attentional Account of Delay-Period Activity
  • An Awareness Account of Delay-Period Activity
  • A Binding Account of Delay-Period Activity
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 7 - Hemispheric Organization of Visual Memory: Analyzing Visual Working Memory With Brain Measures
  • INTRODUCTION
  • GENERAL METHODS
  • Measuring Brain Activity
  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
  • Demonstrating the Hemispheric Organization of Visual Memories
  • The ERL in Working-Memory Paradigms
  • Permanence versus Top-Down Creation of Expectations: Masking Studies
  • Application of the ERL Methodology to Study the Flow of Activation of Visual Representations
  • Advantages of Organizing Information Across Hemispheres
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 8 - Visual Working Memory and Attentional Object Selection
  • ARE REPRESENTATIONS IN VISUAL WORKING MEMORY POSITION-DEPENDENT?
  • ATTENTIONAL OBJECT SELECTION AND WORKING MEMORY MAINTENANCE
  • THE GUIDANCE OF ATTENTIONAL OBJECT SELECTION BY VISUAL WORKING MEMORY
  • SUMMARY
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 9 - Individual Differences in Visual Working Memory Capacity: Contributions of Attentional Control to Storage
  • THE CAPACITY OF VISUAL WORKING MEMORY
  • Individual Differences in VWM Capacity
  • EXPERIMENT 1
  • Method
  • Participants
  • Stimuli and Procedure
  • Results
  • Attentional-Control Account of Individual Differences in Kave
  • Time Invariant Nature of the Visual Working Memory Capacity Estimate within a Session
  • Discussion
  • EXPERIMENT 2
  • Method
  • Participants
  • Stimuli and Procedure
  • Electroencephalogram Recording
  • Measuring the Contralateral Delay Activity
  • Results
  • Behavioral Results
  • ERP Analyses
  • The CDA Amplitude
  • Separating Contralateral and Ipsilateral Activity
  • Discussion
  • EXPERIMENT 3
  • Method
  • Participants
  • Stimuli and Procedure
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • GENERAL DISCUSSION
  • References
  • 10 - Working Memory and Aging: A Review
  • INTRODUCTION
  • Working Memory and Attention
  • Anatomical Underpinnings
  • GENERAL DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 11 - Defining a Role for Lateral Prefrontal Cortex in Memory-Guided Decisions About Visual Motion
  • RESPONSES TO VISUAL MOTION IN LPFC
  • ACTIVITY DURING THE MEMORY DELAY
  • COMPARISON-RELATED ACTIVITY
  • DECISION-RELATED ACTIVITY
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 12 - Working Memory Representations of Visual Motion along the Primate Dorsal Visual Pathway
  • THE SEARCH FOR THE NEURAL CORRELATES OF WORKING MEMORY IN THE PRIMATE BRAIN
  • NEURAL CORRELATES OF WM FOR MOTION IN THE DORSAL VISUAL PATHWAY
  • REDUNDANCY OF WM REPRESENTATIONS IN AREAS MST AND LPFC
  • THE AMPLITUDE OF LOCAL FIELD POTENTIAL OSCILLATIONS IN MT ENCODES THE MEMORIZED DIRECTION
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 13 - Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Working Memory: Cortical Specialization and Plasticity
  • INTRODUCTION
  • PREFRONTAL AND PARIETAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO WORKING MEMORY
  • EFFECTS OF WORKING MEMORY TRAINING ON PREFRONTAL ACTIVITY
  • CHANGES IN WORKING MEMORY PERFORMANCE AND ACTIVITY AFTER PUBERTY
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 14 - Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Auditory Short-Term and Recognition Memory
  • INTRODUCTION
  • Exploring Auditory Short-Term Memory and Recognition Memory
  • Delayed Matching-to-Sample Task
  • Neural Recordings in the Dorsal Temporal Pole
  • Neuronal Recordings in the PFC
  • Neuronal Recordings in A1: Primary Auditory Cortex
  • Neuronal Recordings in R and RT: Additional Core Auditory Cortex Regions
  • DISCUSSION
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 15 - Brain Activity Related to the Retention of Tones in Auditory Short-Term Memory
  • THE SUSTAINED ANTERIOR NEGATIVITY-AN ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATE OF THE RETENTION OF TONES
  • THE ROLE OF INTERNAL REHEARSAL IN AUDITORY SHORT-TERM MEMORY
  • BRAIN AREAS RELATED TO THE RETENTION OF TONES
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • 16 - The Interplay Between Auditory Attention and Working Memory
  • CURRENT VIEWS OF AUDITORY ATTENTION
  • FEATURE-SPECIFIC PROCESSING: A COMPARISON BETWEEN AUDITORY ATTENTION AND WORKING MEMORY
  • PROCESS-SPECIFIC ACTIVATION DURING ATTENTION AND WORKING MEMORY
  • CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • References
  • 17 - Neuroimaging of the Mind's Ear Using Representational Similarity Analysis
  • THE REPRESENTATION OF AUDITORY MEMORIES: CONNECTING THE MIND AND BRAIN
  • Limitations of Conventional Methods
  • Representational Similarity Analysis
  • Memory for Pure Tones
  • Memory for Complex Sounds
  • Why Suppression During Maintenance?
  • FLEXIBILITY OF REPRESENTATIONS ACROSS TASKS
  • Influence of Task on the Representation of Complex Sounds
  • FLEXIBILITY OF REPRESENTATIONS ACROSS INDIVIDUALS
  • SUMMARY
  • References
  • 18 - Remembering Touch: Using Interference Tasks to Study Tactile and Haptic Memory
  • INVESTIGATING OUR SENSE OF TOUCH
  • COMPARING MEMORY FOR VISION AND FOR TOUCH
  • MEMORY FOR TOUCH
  • SENSORY MEMORY IN TOUCH
  • LONG-TERM MEMORY IN TOUCH
  • SHORT-TERM MEMORY AND WORKING MEMORY IN TOUCH
  • ISSUES ARISING FROM THE USE OF INTERFERENCE TECHNIQUES
  • General Principles
  • Experimental Design in Haptic Interference Tasks
  • COMPARING ACROSS INTERFERENCE STUDIES INVESTIGATING TOUCH
  • USING INTERFERENCE TASKS TO INVESTIGATE SHORT-TERM AND WORKING MEMORY IN TOUCH
  • DRAWING CONCLUSIONS FROM STUDIES OF MEMORY FOR TOUCH USING INTERFERENCE TASKS
  • EXPERIMENT 1
  • Method
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • EXPERIMENT 2
  • Method
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • GENERAL DISCUSSION
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 19 - Human Cortical Representation of Tactile Short-Term Memory for Stimulation Patterns on the Hand: Evidence From Magnetoencephalography
  • INTRODUCTION
  • METHOD
  • Participants
  • Material
  • Experimental Procedure
  • Analyses
  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
  • Behavioral Results
  • Localization of MEG Sources
  • Stimulation-Related Activity
  • Retention Interval Activity Source Localization
  • Localization of Oscillatory Activity in Different Frequency Bands
  • Source Localization of Stimulation-Related Activity
  • CONCLUSION
  • References
  • 20 - The Role of Spatial Attention in Tactile Short-Term Memory
  • ATTENTION IN VISUAL STM
  • ATTENTION IN TACTILE PERCEPTION
  • INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF SPATIAL ATTENTION IN TACTILE STM
  • STUDY 1: MEMORY FOR LOCATIONS CAUSES SHIFTS OF TACTILE ATTENTION
  • STUDY 2: FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SPATIAL ATTENTION FOR SPATIAL STM
  • STUDY 3: NON-SPATIAL CUEING OF STM CAUSES SHIFTS OF SPATIAL ATTENTION
  • OVERLAPPING FUNCTIONS OF STM AND PERCEPTION
  • THE ROLE OF SPATIAL ATTENTION IN STM FOR LOCATIONS: ATTENTION-BASED REHEARSAL
  • ARE EFFECTS OF ATTENTION-BASED REHEARSAL GENUINE MEMORY EFFECTS OR ARE THEY CAUSED BY ANTICIPATORY ATTENTION?
  • SELECTION OF NON-SPATIAL ATTRIBUTES WITHIN THE SPATIAL LAYOUT OF STM
  • MODALITY-SPECIFIC AND SUPRAMODAL MECHANISMS OF EXECUTIVE CONTROL IN STM
  • THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • Back Cover

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