Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems

 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 14. Dezember 2017
  • |
  • 288 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-801957-3 (ISBN)
 

Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems provides a new and promising approach for engineering the requirements of software-intensive systems, presenting a systematic, promising approach to identifying, clarifying, modeling, deriving, and validating the requirements of software-intensive systems from well-modeled environment simulations. In addition, the book presents a new view of software capability, i.e. the effect-based software capability in terms of environment modeling.

  • Provides novel and systematic methodologies for engineering the requirements of software-intensive systems
  • Describes ontologies and easily-understandable notations for modeling software-intensive systems
  • Analyzes the functional and non-functional requirements based on the properties of the software surroundings
  • Provides an essential, practical guide and formalization tools for the task of identifying the requirements of software-intensive systems
  • Gives system analysts and requirements engineers insight into how to recognize and structure the problems of developing software-intensive systems


Prof. Zhi Jin is a full professor at Peking University. Her research interests include knowledge-based requirements engineering. She has published more than 100 papers in refereed journals and conferences in knowledge engineering and requirements engineering and related topics. She is a published author having written two books; Domain Modeling-Based Software Engineering: A Formal Approach (ISBN: 0-7923-7889-X, Kluwer Academic Publishers) and a computer science textbook in Chinese published by Science Press. She has years of working experience in ontology engineering, knowledge-based requirements engineering, and service-oriented modelling
  • Englisch
  • San Francisco
  • |
  • USA
  • 22,49 MB
978-0-12-801957-3 (9780128019573)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems
  • Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • About the Author
  • Preface
  • ORGANIZATION
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 - Background
  • 1 - Requirements and Requirements Engineering**This chapter serves to deliver general background knowledge about re ...
  • 1.1 REQUIREMENTS
  • 1.1.1 SYSTEM LEVEL VERSUS FUNCTION LEVEL
  • 1.1.2 "WHAT" VERSUS "HOW"
  • 1.1.3 PROBLEM VERSUS SOLUTION
  • 1.1.4 SUMMARY
  • 1.2 REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING
  • 1.3 THREE DIMENSIONS OF REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING
  • 2 - Requirements Engineering Methodologies
  • 2.1 METAPHOR: "TO-BE SYSTEM IS FOR AUTOMATICALLY MEASURING AND CONTROLLING THE REALITY"
  • 2.2 METAPHOR: "TO-BE SYSTEM IS FOR FULFILLING REAL-WORLD GOALS THAT STAKEHOLDERS WANT TO ACHIEVE"
  • 2.3 METAPHOR: "TO-BE SYSTEM IS FOR IMPROVING THE DEPENDENCIES AMONG INTENTIONAL ACTORS"
  • 2.4 METAPHOR: "TO-BE SYSTEM IS FOR ENHANCING THE AS-IS SYSTEM USAGE EXPERIENCE"
  • 2.5 METAPHOR: "TO-BE SYSTEM IS FOR ESTABLISHING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PHENOMENA OF REALITY"
  • 2.6 SUMMARY
  • 3 - Importance of Interactive Environment
  • 3.1 SOFTWARE-INTENSIVE SYSTEMS
  • 3.2 CHALLENGES TO REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING
  • 3.2.1 INCREASING SIZE AND COMPLEXITY
  • 3.2.2 OPEN AND NONDETERMINISTIC ENVIRONMENT
  • 3.2.3 SITUATION AWARENESS AND ADAPTATION
  • 3.2.4 INNOVATION-ENABLED REQUIREMENTS
  • 3.3 ENVIRONMENT, REQUIREMENTS, AND SPECIFICATION
  • 3.3.1 RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE THREE
  • 3.3.2 ENVIRONMENT PROPERTIES IS THE FIRST CITIZEN
  • 3.3.2.1 First, Requirements Are the Problem That Is Expected to Be Solved
  • 3.3.2.2 Second, Environment Properties Constitute the Context of the Problem
  • 3.3.2.3 Third, the System Is a Candidate Solution for Solving the Problem Within the Context
  • 3.3.3 INTERFACES ARE ANOTHER CONCERN
  • 3.3.4 SUMMARY
  • Part One References
  • 2 - Ontology and System-Interactive Environment Ontology
  • 4 - Ontology-Oriented Interactive Environment Modeling
  • 4.1 ONTOLOGY AND ONTOLOGIES
  • 4.1.1 BACKGROUND
  • 4.1.2 DIFFERENT VIEWPOINTS ON ONTOLOGY
  • 4.1.3 COMMON STRUCTURE OF ONTOLOGY
  • 4.2 TYPES OF ONTOLOGIES
  • 4.3 ONTOLOGY-ORIENTED DOMAIN MODELING
  • 4.3.1 THE PROCESS FOR ONTOLOGY-ORIENTED DOMAIN MODELING
  • 4.3.2 THE STRUCTURE FOR DOMAIN ONTOLOGY
  • 4.4 TOP-LEVEL ENVIRONMENT ONTOLOGY
  • 4.4.1 SOFTWARE SYSTEM PROBLEM AND ITS LOCATION
  • 4.4.2 CONCEPT CATEGORIES AND ASSOCIATIONS OF SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
  • 4.5 DOMAIN ENVIRONMENT ONTOLOGY
  • 4.5.1 CONCEPTUALIZATION OF ENVIRONMENT ENTITIES
  • 4.5.2 FORMALIZATION OF ENVIRONMENT ENTITY
  • 4.5.3 DEPENDENCY BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT ENTITIES
  • 5 - Domain Environment Ontology Construction
  • 5.1 DOMAIN ENVIRONMENT MODELING VIA KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING
  • 5.2 DOMAIN ENVIRONMENT ONTOLOGY CONSTRUCTION
  • 5.3 AUTOMATIC DOMAIN ENVIRONMENT ONTOLOGY CONSTRUCTION
  • ALGORITHM 5.1. CONSTRUCTING BASIC STATE MACHINES
  • ALGORITHM 5.2. CONSTRUCTING DOMAIN TREE-BASED HIERARCHICAL STATE MACHINE IN TERMS OF THE INHERITANCE RELATIONSHIP
  • ALGORITHM 5.3. CONSTRUCTING DOMAIN TREE-BASED HIERARCHICAL STATE MACHINE IN TERMS OF THE COMPONENT RELATIONSHIP
  • 5.4 ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF DOMAIN ENVIRONMENT ONTOLOGY
  • 5.5 SUMMARY
  • 6 - Feature Model of Domain Environment
  • 6.1 FEATURE MODEL AND FEATURE CONFIGURATION
  • 6.1.1 PRIMITIVE ELEMENTS IN FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.1.2 FEATURE CONFIGURATION AND SOFTWARE SYSTEM FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.2 ENVIRONMENT FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.2.1 FEATURES FOR ENVIRONMENT CONCEPTUALIZATION
  • 6.2.2 HIERARCHY OF ENVIRONMENT FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.2.3 ENVIRONMENT FEATURE CONFIGURATION
  • 6.3 GOAL FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.3.1 AUTONOMOUS ENTITY AND INTENTIONAL PROPERTY
  • 6.3.2 INTENTIONAL GOAL AND GOAL FEATURE MODEL
  • 6.3.3 HIERARCHY OF GOAL FEATURE MODELS
  • 6.4 SUMMARY
  • Part Two References
  • FURTHER READING
  • 3 - Environment Modeling-Based System Capability
  • 7 - Effect-Oriented System Capability
  • 7.1 CAPABILITY SPECIFICATION OF SEMANTIC WEB SERVICES
  • 7.1.1 CAPABILITY DESCRIPTION IN WEB ONTOLOGY LANGUAGE FOR SERVICES66SEE FOOTNOTE 3.
  • 7.1.2 WEB SERVICE MODELING IN WEB SERVICE MODELING ONTOLOGY99SEE FOOTNOTE 4.
  • 7.1.3 SUMMARY OF THE WEB SERVICE CAPABILITY DESCRIPTION
  • 7.2 EFFECT-BASED CAPABILITY MODEL
  • 7.2.1 EFFECT UPON THE INTERACTIVE ENVIRONMENT
  • 7.2.2 SYSTEM CAPABILITY CONCEPTUALIZATION
  • 7.3 SYSTEM CAPABILITY PROFILE
  • 7.3.1 CAPABILITY PROFILE
  • 7.3.2 AN EXAMPLE CAPABILITY PROFILE
  • 7.3.3 CAPABILITY SPECIFICATION GENERATION
  • 7.4 SUMMARY
  • 8 - Reasoning I: System Capability Comparison and Composition
  • 8.1 RELATED WORK IN SERVICE-ORIENTED COMPUTING
  • 8.1.1 STANDARD LANGUAGES ENABLING MATCHMAKING
  • 8.1.2 SYNTACTIC SIMILARITY-BASED MATCHMAKING
  • 8.1.3 BEHAVIOR-BASED INTELLIGENT MATCHMAKING
  • 8.1.4 SERVICE COMPOSITION
  • 8.2 ENVIRONMENT MODELING-BASED CAPABILITY COMPARISON
  • 8.2.1 REQUIRED CAPABILITY
  • 8.2.2 CONTEXT SIMILARITY
  • 8.2.3 EFFECT COMPARISON
  • 8.3 ENVIRONMENT MODELING-BASED CAPABILITY COMPOSITION
  • 8.4 SUMMARY
  • 9 - Reasoning II: System Capability Refinement
  • 9.1 GUIDED PROCESS FOR SCENARIO DESCRIPTION
  • 9.1.1 THE PROCESS
  • 9.1.2 AN EXAMPLE
  • 9.2 SCENARIO-BASED CAPABILITY PROJECTION
  • 9.2.1 PRELIMINARY
  • 9.2.2 WELL-FORMED SCENARIO (JIN ET AL., 2009)
  • 9.2.3 HEURISTIC STRATEGIES FOR SCENARIO ELABORATION (JIN ET AL., 2009)
  • 9.2.4 PROJECTION UPON WELL-FORMED SCENARIO
  • 9.3 SUMMARY
  • 10 - Reasoning III: System Capability Aggregation
  • 10.1 PRINCIPLES AND ARCHITECTURE
  • 10.1.1 GENERAL PRINCIPLES
  • 10.1.2 ARCHITECTURE
  • 10.2 REQUIREMENTS-DRIVEN AGENT AGGREGATION
  • 10.2.1 CAPABILITY PROJECTION REPHRASING
  • 10.2.2 CAPABILITY REALIZATION PATTERN
  • 10.2.3 CAPABILITY AGGREGATION: NOTATIONS
  • 10.2.4 CAPABILITY AGGREGATION: MECHANISM DESIGN
  • 10.2.5 CAPABILITY AGGREGATION: BENEVOLENT OBJECTIVE FUNCTION
  • 10.3 CAPABILITY ASSIGNMENT PROBLEM (TANG AND JIN, 2010)
  • 10.3.1 PROBLEM DEFINITION
  • 10.3.2 NORMATIVE SYSTEMS
  • 10.3.3 NEGOTIATION-BASED TASK ASSIGNMENT
  • 10.4 SUMMARY
  • Part Three References
  • 4 - Environment-Related Nonfunctionalities
  • 11 - The System Dependability Problem
  • 11.1 BACKGROUND AND PRINCIPLES
  • 11.1.1 BACKGROUND
  • 11.1.2 STATE OF ART
  • 11.1.2.1 Unified Model of Dependability
  • 11.1.3 PRINCIPLES OF IDENTIFYING DEPENDABILITY REQUIREMENTS
  • 11.2 CYBERNETICS AND MODEL OF DEPENDABLE SYSTEMS
  • 11.2.1 CYBERNETICS AND CONTROL LOOPS
  • 11.2.2 MODEL OF DEPENDABLE SYSTEMS
  • 11.3 FUNCTION AND CONTROL CAPABILITY PROFILE CLUSTER REQUIREMENTS ELICITATION AND MODELING
  • 11.3.1 FUNCTION AND CONTROL CAPABILITY PROFILE CLUSTER METAMODEL
  • 11.3.2 ELICITATION OF DEPENDABILITY REQUIREMENTS
  • 11.3.2.1 Hazard and Operability Study-Based Threat and System Behavior Deviation Identification
  • 11.3.2.2 Risk Assessment
  • 11.3.2.3 Control Capability Determination
  • 11.3.2.4 Control Capability Specification
  • 11.3.3 CASE STUDY: ONLINE STOCK TRADING SYSTEM
  • 11.3.3.1 Eliciting Dependability Requirements by Identifying Needs for Controllers
  • 11.4 SUMMARY
  • 12 - The System Dynamic Adaptability Concern
  • 12.1 DYNAMIC ADAPTATION MECHANISMS
  • 12.1.1 RULE-BASED DYNAMIC ADAPTATION
  • 12.1.2 GOAL-ORIENTED ADAPTATION MECHANISM
  • 12.1.3 CONTROL LOOP-BASED SYSTEM MODEL
  • 12.2 MODELING DYNAMIC ADAPTATION CAPABILITY
  • 12.2.1 CONFORMANCE AMONG REQ, ENV, AND SPEC AS DYNAMIC ADAPTATION LOGIC
  • 12.2.2 STRUCTURING THE ENVIRONMENT
  • 12.2.3 CAPABILITY MODEL FOR ADAPTATION MECHANISM
  • 12.3 EXPRESSION OF CONFORMANCE-BASED DYNAMICAL ADAPTATION
  • 12.3.1 ?RULE: SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS
  • 12.3.2 CONFORMANCE RELATIONSHIPS BY ?RULES
  • 12.3.3 FUNCTION IDENTIFICATION ACCORDING TO ?RULES-BASED ADAPTATION LOGIC
  • 12.4 SUMMARY
  • 13 - Other Nonfunctionality Patterns
  • 13.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 13.1.1 PROBLEM-ORIENTED NONFUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT PATTERNS
  • 13.1.2 STRUCTURE OF A PROBLEM-ORIENTED NONFUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT PATTERN
  • 13.1.3 PROCESS OF USING A PROBLEM-ORIENTED NONFUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT PATTERN
  • 13.2 PROBLEM-ORIENTED NONFUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT PATTERNS AND THEIR CONCERNS
  • 13.2.1 AUTHORIZATION PATTERN
  • 13.2.2 BUFFER PATTERN
  • 13.2.3 INDEX PATTERN
  • 13.2.4 LOG PATTERN
  • 13.2.5 PERCEPTION AND REACTION PATTERN
  • 13.2.6 ENCRYPTION AND DECRYPTION PATTERN
  • 13.3 A CASE STUDY
  • 13.4 DISCUSSION
  • Part Four References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • Back Cover

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