Linguistic Diversity on the EMI Campus

Insider accounts of the use of English and other languages in universities within Asia, Australasia, and Europe
 
 
Routledge (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 29. März 2019
  • |
  • 294 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-429-66836-4 (ISBN)
 

Linguistic Diversity on the EMI Campus presents an in-depth ethnographic case study of the language policies and practices of universities in nine countries around the world. Each chapter provides a detailed presentation of the findings from that university, considering the presence of linguistic diversity in institutions from Australia, China, Finland, UK, Turkey, Malaysia, Italy, Spain, and Japan. Split into three parts, these nine case studies demonstrate the extent to which international-oriented institutions can learn from each other's practices and improve their language policies. Linguistic Diversity on the EMI Campus is vital reading for students and scholars working in the fields of applied linguistics, multilingualism, and education.

  • Englisch
  • Milton
  • |
  • Großbritannien
Taylor & Francis Ltd
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
53 schwarz-weiße Abbildungen, 49 schwarz-weiße Fotos, 4 schwarz-weiße Zeichnungen, 8 schwarz-weiße Tabellen
  • 84758,84 MB
978-0-429-66836-4 (9780429668364)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Jennifer Jenkins is Chair Professor of Global Englishes at Southampton University, where she is founding director of the Centre for Global Englishes. She has published numerous monographs, edited volumes, articles, and chapters on ELF since 1996, including her first monograph, The Phonology of English as an International Language (2000), and The Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca (co-edited with Will Baker and Martin Dewey, 2017).

Anna Mauranen is Professor and Research Director at the University of Helsinki. She is co-editor of Applied Linguistics and former co-editor of the Journal of English as a Lingua Franca. Recent books include Changing English (2017, edited with Filppula, Klemola, and Vetchinnikova) and Exploring ELF (2012).

  • Cover
  • Half Title
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Table of contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • List of Contributors
  • Introduction
  • 1 Researching linguistic diversity on English-medium campuses
  • 1. Conceptual and empirical origins of the project: English as a lingua franca
  • 2. International higher education and the ubiquity of English
  • 3. The Linguistic Diversity on the International Campus project
  • 4. The organisation of this volume
  • Note
  • References
  • PART I Continental Europe
  • 2 ELF among multilingual practices in a trilingual university
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Setting and framework
  • 3. Data and methods
  • 4. Context and documents
  • 4.1 The broader context: languages in Finnish academia
  • 4.2 Institutional intention: the University Language Policy
  • 4.3 The university website
  • 5. Linguistic landscapes
  • 6. Students' metalinguistic representation of languaging practices
  • 6.1 Receptive languaging
  • 6.1.1 Contextualisation
  • 6.1.2 Fragment recognition
  • 6.2 Productive languaging
  • 6.2.1 Lexicogrammatical simplification
  • 6.2.2 Phonetic simplification
  • 6.2.3 Slipping
  • 6.3 Cooperative languaging
  • 6.3.1 Co-construction
  • 6.3.2 Cross-languaging
  • 7. Discussion
  • Notes
  • References
  • 3 Internationalisation and linguistic diversity in a mid-sized Italian university
  • 1. The Italian university system in transition: globalisation, European integration, and the role of EMI
  • 2. "Old" and "new" internationalisation at the University of Siena
  • 3. Analytic framework and motives for data selection
  • 4. The internationalisation-English nexus in policy documents
  • 5. Website analysis: representing the university and EMI degree courses to potential students
  • 6. Linguistic landscape analysis
  • 7. Structures of governance, intended addressees, and the explicitation of language policy
  • Notes
  • References
  • 4 Linguistic diversity in a traditionally monolingual university: A multi-analytical approach
  • 1. Background of the study
  • 2. Internationalising the Spanish HE sector
  • 3. Datasets and analytical frameworks
  • 4. Results
  • 4.1 Document analysis
  • 4.2 Analysis of EMI lectures
  • 4.3 Staff's attitudes and perceptions
  • 5. Final considerations
  • Acknowledgements
  • Notes
  • References
  • 5 The scope of linguistic diversity in the language policies, practices, and linguistic landscape...
  • 1. English-medium instruction in Turkish higher education
  • 2. Theoretical framework
  • 2.1 Language policy
  • 2.2 Linguistic landscape
  • 3. Methodology
  • 3.1 Document analysis
  • 3.2 Linguistic landscape analysis
  • 3.3 Interviews
  • 4. Results and discussion
  • 4.1 Website data
  • 4.2 Policy documents
  • 4.2.1 English language requirement
  • Whose/which English
  • Exemptions from entry requirements
  • 4.2.2 Language support
  • The kind of English desired
  • 4.3 Linguistic landscape
  • 4.3.1 Diversity of languages and predominant ideology
  • 4.4 Interviews
  • 4.4.1 Policies and practices concerning lecturers
  • Entry requirements for teaching staff and the kind of English required
  • Views on entry requirements
  • 4.4.2 Expectations about language use and students' English
  • Orientations to bi/multilingual practices
  • Non-normative expectations
  • 4.4.3 Students' orientations to university's policies and practices
  • Views on entry requirements
  • The kind of English taught in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programmes and student views on language support
  • Students' expectations about lecturers' language use
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Notes
  • References
  • PART II East and Southeast Asia
  • 6 Linguistic diversity on a Chinese university campus: Myths of language policy and means of practice
  • 1. Contextualising the research: English in China
  • 1.1 Brief introduction
  • 1.2 English language teaching in Chinese higher education
  • 2. Methodology
  • 2.1 Research context
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Data collection and analysis
  • 3. Findings
  • 3.1 Analysis of university websites
  • 3.2 Syllabi analysis
  • 3.2.1 Language choice and stated language use
  • 3.2.2 Course materials
  • 3.3 Student interview findings
  • 3.3.1 Language prerequisites
  • 3.3.2 Language use in and after class
  • 3.3.3 Perceptions of EMI courses
  • Teacher interview findings
  • 3.4 Linguistic landscape
  • 4. Discussion and implications
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Notes
  • References
  • 7 Realities of EMI practices among multilingual students in a Japanese university
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. An EMI programme (EMIP) at a university in Tokyo: opening up a possibility?
  • 3. The second contributing factor for linguistic diversity at policy level - the one-year study abroad programme
  • 4. Classroom interaction level or micro-level diversity
  • 4.1 Methods and data
  • 4.1.1 Data for the investigation of linguistic diversity at macro- or policy level
  • 4.1.2 Data for the investigation of linguistic diversity at micro- or classroom interaction level
  • 5. Findings and discussion
  • 5.1 Classroom interaction level diversity - teachers' deployment of students' diversity and sharedness
  • 5.2 Classroom interaction level diversity - students' deployment of their linguistic diversity
  • 5.3 Opportunities for intercultural communication - towards full exploitation of diverse linguacultural backgrounds?
  • 6. Conclusions and implications
  • Acknowledgements
  • Notes
  • References
  • 8 Going global: EMI policies and practices at a Malaysian public university
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. University of Malaya: going global
  • 2.1 Policy on the medium of instruction
  • 3. Methodology
  • 4. Data analysis
  • 4.1 The use of Malay in addition to English
  • 4.2 Using and accepting a range of Englishes
  • 4.3 Accommodative behaviour in intercultural communication
  • 4.4 Meeting language expectations
  • 5. Discussion and conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • PART III The Anglophone world
  • 9 Linguistic diversity on an Australian university campus: An ethnographic case study
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Local and national backgrounds to the study
  • 3. Previous research on the context of the study
  • 4. Methodology
  • 5. Analytical framework
  • 6. Findings, discussions, and implications
  • 6.1 The AU is a "richly diverse and inclusive community" and diversity is valued as "among this University's...
  • 6.2 Despite the overt linguistic diversity and cultural inclusion, a covert language hierarchy exists on the AU campuses
  • 6.3 The AU language policies need to be reinstated in alignment with Australia's National Policy on Languages
  • 6.4 The changing AU linguistic landscape embodies a paradigm shift, which in turn has an impact on the mindscape...
  • 6.5 More systematic proposals and measures in relation to linguistic diversity on the AU campus need to be developed...
  • 7. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 10 How much linguistic diversity on a UK university campus?
  • 1. Introduction: the university and our research focus
  • 2. Southampton methodology
  • 3. Southampton findings and discussion
  • 3.1 Documentary analysis
  • 3.2 Linguistic landscaping analysis
  • 3.3 Classroom observation analysis
  • 3.4 Interview analysis
  • Exchange 1: Thai student
  • Exchange 2: Hong Kong student
  • Exchange 3: Iranian student
  • 4. Drawing our findings together
  • References
  • Conclusion
  • 11 Where are we with linguistic diversity on international campuses?
  • 1. Why internationalise?
  • 2. The kind of English desired
  • 3. Tensions between English and local languages
  • 4. Further questions
  • References
  • Index
"This cutting-edge volume is remarkable for its global coverage and methodological coherence, as nine research teams around the globe address the same research questions exploring the interplay between internationalization, language policies, and practices. It unveils tensions between the dichotomous ideologies of national languages versus English as an academic lingua franca."





Maria Kuteeva, Stockholm University, Sweden

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