Inclusive Transport

Fighting Involuntary Transport Disadvantages
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 29. Oktober 2018
  • |
  • 238 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-813453-5 (ISBN)
 

Inclusive Transport: Fighting Involuntary Transport Disadvantages offers readers profound and multifaceted insights into transportation and social equity, guiding transportation and urban studies researchers, planners, and policy makers in evaluating potential solutions to this complex issue. It considers discrimination and its societal consequences, providing a needed perspective on who is left out of transportation planning, and why.

The book is systematically divided into 2 parts, Part A is problem oriented and explores the main problems to the transportation disadvantaged; accessibility and affordability. It looks at the consequences of non-accessibility, the problems non-car owners face, and the interplay between housing and transportation; Part B is policy oriented and analyses how current policies tend to forget transport disadvantages. It looks at pragmatic solutions for transport disadvantaged and ends with a design for inclusive transport, being a more radical approach combining sustainability challenges, people's behaviours and emotions, creating more just and equitable mobility.

  • Synthesizes academic research and narratives on transport disadvantage and the transport disadvantaged, linking the research with current mobility policies and practices
  • Connects the fight on transport disadvantages with sustainable and smart mobility strategies and looks into car sharing, ride sharing and individualising public transport while de- individualizing car use
  • Has an extensive usage of data, figures, and examples from around the world, and inspiring mobility plans and policies


Hans Jeekel is the Professor of Societal Aspects of Smart Mobility at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands. He is a former Member of Parliament in the Netherlands and former Director of the Dutch Transport Research Institute. He a corporate strategist at the Dutch National Highway Agency, and was Chairman of the Board of the Association for European Transport, and author of The Car Dependent Society (Routledge, 2013).
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
  • 8,51 MB
978-0-12-813453-5 (9780128134535)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Inclusive Transport
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • A: Involuntary Transport Disadvantage
  • 1 Setting the Scene: A World of Transport Disadvantages
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Four Examples
  • 1.2.1 Escaping Hurricane Katrina
  • 1.2.2 Job Seeking in Rotterdam South
  • 1.2.3 Living in Peri-Urbanized Areas in France
  • 1.2.4 Reaching Services in Melbourne
  • 1.3 Transport Disadvantage as a Concept
  • 1.4 History of the Concept of Transport Disadvantage
  • 1.5 Unpacking the Central Problems
  • 1.5.1 Voluntary or Involuntary?
  • 1.5.2 Involuntary Transport Disadvantage
  • 1.5.3 Social Capital, Social Networks, Social Disadvantage
  • 1.5.4 Social Exclusion via Transport
  • 1.5.5 Accessibility
  • 1.6 A World of Frames
  • 1.6.1 Poverty
  • 1.6.2 Social Inequality
  • 1.6.3 Social Justice
  • 1.6.4 Social Sustainability
  • 1.6.5 Social Practices
  • 1.6.6 Lifestyle
  • 1.6.7 Social Well-Being and Quality of Life
  • 1.6.8 Too Many Unconnected Frames
  • 1.7 A World of Measuring and Indicators
  • 1.7.1 The Basis for Measuring Transport Disadvantage
  • 1.7.2 Location-Based Accessibility Measures and Indicators
  • 1.7.3 Person-Based Accessibility Measures and Indicators
  • 1.7.4 Other Accessibility Measures and Indicators
  • 1.7.5 Too Many Measures and Indicators
  • 2 Transport Disadvantage in Practice: Geographical Perspectives
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Transport Disadvantage in Urban Areas
  • 2.2.1 General Overview
  • 2.2.2 Transport Disadvantage in the Urban Worlds of the OECD
  • 2.2.3 Transport Disadvantage in OECD Urban Areas: Some Specific Problems
  • 2.2.3.1 Spatial Mismatch
  • 2.2.3.2 Food Deserts
  • 2.2.3.3 Gentrification, Housing, and Transport Disadvantage
  • 2.2.4 Transport Disadvantage in Cities in the Developing World
  • 2.3 Transport Disadvantage in Suburban and Peri-Urban Areas
  • 2.3.1 General Overview
  • 2.3.2 Suburban Poverty and Transport Disadvantage
  • 2.3.3 Suburbs and Transport Disadvantages: The Banlieu as an Example
  • 2.3.4 From Suburbia to the Peri-Urban Areas
  • 2.4 Transport Disadvantage in the Rural Areas
  • 2.4.1 General Overview
  • 2.4.2 Rural Mobility in Northern America: The Great Plains and Especially North Dakota
  • 2.4.3 Rural Mobility in Western Europa: With a Focus on Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (Germany)
  • 2.4.4 Transport Disadvantage in the Rural Areas of the Developing World
  • 2.5 Transport Disadvantages in Geographical Perspective: Some First Conclusions
  • 3 Transport Disadvantages: Social and Societal Perspectives
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Transport Disadvantages for Specific Groups
  • 3.2.1 Children and Adolescents
  • 3.2.1.1 Children Until Age 12: Loss of Independent Mobility
  • 3.2.1.1.1 State of Art and First Analysis
  • 3.2.1.1.2 Discussing Fear, Anxiety, and Children's Mobility
  • 3.2.1.1.3 Children's Perceptions and Conclusion
  • 3.2.1.2 Adolescents (12-18): Feeling Stuck Near to Your Home Residence
  • 3.2.2 Elderly
  • 3.2.2.1 Mobility Patterns of the Elderly
  • 3.2.2.2 Mobility Cultures of the Elderly
  • 3.2.2.3 Two Specific Problems: Single Older Women Without Driving Licenses and Driving Cessation
  • 3.2.2.3.1 Single Older Women
  • 3.2.2.3.2 Driving Cessation
  • 3.2.3 Disabled
  • 3.2.3.1 Disabled People and Transport Disadvantage
  • 3.2.3.2 Mobility and Disability
  • 3.2.3.3 Expectations and Experiences
  • 3.3 Two Transversal Themes
  • 3.3.1 Poverty
  • 3.3.1.1 Mobility and Poverty, the General Picture
  • 3.3.1.2 Poverty, Affordability, and Car-Related Economic Stress
  • 3.3.1.2.1 North America
  • 3.3.1.2.2 Europe and Australia
  • 3.3.1.2.3 In General
  • 3.3.1.2.4 Crisis, Fuel Costs, and Mobility
  • 3.3.1.3 Three Vulnerable Household Types: Ethnic Minority Households, Asylum Seekers, and Single-Parent Households
  • 3.3.1.3.1 Ethnic Minority Households
  • 3.3.1.3.2 Asylum Seekers and Refugees
  • 3.3.1.3.3 Single-Parent Households
  • 3.3.1.4 Mobility and Poverty in Latin America
  • 3.3.2 Gender
  • 3.3.2.1 Gender in Mobility: Patterns and Symbols
  • 3.3.2.2 Decline or Stagnation in Gender Gaps
  • 3.3.2.3 Transport Disadvantage and Stress Related to Gender
  • 3.3.2.3.1 Temporary Transport Disadvantage
  • 3.3.2.3.2 Stress Related to Complex Transport Patterns
  • 3.3.2.3.3 Middle-Aged Single Households and Elements of Gender
  • 3.4 Some Conclusions
  • 3.4.1 About Accessibility of Services and Amenities
  • 3.4.2 About Transport Disadvantage in Societal Perspective
  • B: Toward Inclusive Transport
  • 4 A Marginal Issue?
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 National Politicians and Policy Makers: Economic Growth as the Core
  • 4.3 Urban Policies, Politicians, and planners: Liveability, Differentiation, and Innovative Themes
  • 4.4 Transport Research and Transport Researchers: The Focus on Engineering and Traditional Economics
  • 4.5 The Majority of Households: Subscribing to the Car Dependence Organization
  • 4.5.1 General State of Art and Typology of Households
  • 4.5.2 Subscribing to the Car Dependence Organization
  • 4.6 The Business World: Resistance to Regime Change
  • 4.7 The Result: Weak Alternatives and "Following Wisely"
  • 4.7.1 Weak Alternatives
  • 4.7.1.1 Public Transport
  • 4.7.1.2 Technology Fix
  • 4.7.1.3 Nudging and Soft Measures
  • 4.7.1.4 Messages From Academia
  • 4.7.1.5 Lack of Voice of the Involuntary Transport Disadvantaged
  • 4.7.1.6 To Conclude
  • 4.7.2 "Following Wisely"
  • 4.7.3 To Conclude
  • 4.8 Mobility and Policies in the Developing World
  • 4.8.1 The Generic Picture on Mobility Policies in Developing Countries
  • 4.8.2 Experiences and Expectations on Three Continents
  • 4.8.3 To Conclude
  • 5 Fighting Involuntary Transport Disadvantages: The Pragmatic Solutions
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Accessibility Planning
  • 5.2.1 The Start, 2001-03
  • 5.2.2 After a Decade: The House of Commons Inquiry, 2013
  • 5.2.3 The Main Barriers for Accessibility Planning
  • 5.2.4 Difficult and Missing Dialogues: The Gaps Between Researchers and Practitioners
  • 5.3 Routing, Timetabling, and Pricing of Public Transport
  • 5.3.1 State of Art and Objectives on Public Transport
  • 5.3.2 Looking at Public Transport Systems
  • 5.3.3 (Re) Designing Public Transport: Routing, Timetabling, Pricing
  • 5.4 The Public Transport Solutions in the More Rural Areas
  • 5.4.1 The Situation on Public Transport: Budget Cuts, Investments, and Pragmatism
  • 5.4.2 Demand Responsive Transport
  • 5.4.3 Public Transport, Volunteers, and Community Action
  • 5.4.4 Rural Public Transport Solutions in Perspective
  • 5.5 Transport Solutions in More Urban Areas in Perspective
  • 5.6 Smart Mobility and the Transport Disadvantaged
  • 5.7 A Disappointing Picture
  • 5.7.1 What Is Working, but.
  • 5.7.2 What Is Not Working
  • 5.7.3 New Visions, but.
  • 5.7.4 The Last Resort
  • 5.7.5 The Decision Makers
  • 6 Towards Inclusive Transport: The Radical Approach
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Modern Society and Inclusive Transport
  • 6.2.1 Characteristics of Modern Societies
  • 6.2.2 Individualism and its Consequences
  • 6.2.3 Segregation in Mobility Experiences, Lack of Trust and Social Cohesion
  • 6.2.4 Neoliberal Landscapes and Perspectives for Inclusive Transport
  • 6.3 Inclusive Transport and Sustainable Mobility
  • 6.3.1 Reaching Global Warming Objectives in Surface Transport
  • 6.3.2 Electric Vehicles as a "deus ex machina"
  • 6.3.3 Pathways to Sustainable Mobility and Relation to Inclusive Transport
  • 6.4 Insights on Global Warming, Car Dependence, Accessibility and Land Use: the Input from 12 Researchers from Four Countries
  • 6.4.1 United Kingdom: David Banister, John Urry, and Greg Marsden
  • 6.4.1.1 David Banister
  • 6.4.1.2 John Urry
  • 6.4.1.3 Greg Marsden
  • 6.4.2 Germany
  • Weert Canzler, Stephan Rammler, and Martin Lanzendorf
  • 6.4.2.1 Weert Canzler
  • 6.4.2.2 Stephan Rammler
  • 6.4.2.3 Martin Lanzendorf
  • 6.4.3 France: Jean Pierre Orfeuil, Sylvie Fol, Benjamin Motte Baumvol
  • 6.4.3.1 Jean Pierre Orfeuil
  • 6.4.3.2 Sylvie Fol
  • 6.4.3.3 Benjamin Motte Baumvol
  • 6.4.4 Australia
  • Jeff Kenworthy, Corinne Mulley, Jago Dodson
  • 6.4.4.1 Jeff Kenworthy
  • 6.4.4.2 Corinne Mulley
  • 6.4.4.3 Jago Dodson
  • 6.4.5 The Challenges and Perspectives from the 12 Authors Or
  • What Is the Common Denominator?
  • 6.4.5.1 Current Situation on Mobility and Land Use, in Relation to Involuntary Transport Disadvantage, and Global Warming
  • 6.4.5.1.1 The Connection Between the Insights of Mobility Researchers and the Creation of National Mobility Policies Is Lost
  • 6.4.5.1.2 The Researchers are Negative on National Policies on Global Warming and Mobility Presented Thus Far and Ask for L...
  • 6.4.5.1.3 Especially on the Perspectives for Poorer and Noncar Owning Households a Lack of Attention in Policy Circles Can ...
  • 6.4.5.1.4 Mobility Researchers Have Presented in the Last Decade a Long List of Proposals and Solutions That Have Not Been ...
  • 6.4.5.1.5 The Situation Seems Less Bad When Moving to Urban Governments, Here Some Reception of Insights Could Be Noted
  • 6.4.5.1.6 All in All, When The Current Situation Prevails, Researchers Paint for the Future of Mobility a Rather Gloomy Picture
  • 6.4.5.2 Programme Toward the Future
  • 6.4.5.2.1 Researchers Take Involuntary Transport Disadvantage and Car-Related Economic Stress Serious and Present a Spectru...
  • 6.4.5.2.2 To Reach the Objectives of Global Warming Policy New Mobility Systems Are Needed
  • 6.4.5.2.3 A Deindividualization of Car Mobility Is Necessary, and Sharing Options Create New Perspectives, But This All Nee...
  • 6.4.5.2.4 Cities Could Be Frontrunners, and Should Ban Individual Car Mobility From their Centers
  • 6.4.5.2.5 Investments in Mobility Have to be Shifted From Road Infrastructures to Public Transport, to Specific Rural Servi...
  • 6.4.5.2.6 Electric Driving is not the Solution for Global Warming, As Long As Electric Driving Means Just Substituting the ...
  • 6.4.6 Splitting the Two Themes
  • 6.5 Realizing Inclusive Transport: The Radical Approach
  • 6.5.1 Introduction to the Radical Approach
  • 6.5.1.1 Realizing inclusive transport means fighting segregation in passenger transport
  • 6.5.2 Redirecting Arrangements Leading to Car Dependence
  • 6.5.2.1 On Time Scheduling and Flexibility
  • 6.5.2.2 On Dispersal of Activities, Highway Locations, and Suburbia
  • 6.5.2.3 On Community Light, Protection Against Fear, and Predictability Need
  • 6.5.2.4 On Instant Gratification
  • 6.5.2.5 Summary of the Four Drivers
  • 6.5.3 Using Remaining Cars to Their Full Potential
  • 6.5.4 Creating an Inspiring Policy for Inclusive Transport
  • 6.5.4.1 Emancipation: The Social Aspects in Transport Systems and Transport Policies
  • 6.5.4.2 Social Justice in Mobility
  • 6.5.4.3 Learning from Japan
  • 6.5.4.3.1 Less Car Dependence
  • 6.5.4.3.2 Inclusive Transport Based on Laws and Plans
  • 6.6 To Conclude: A Wrap-Up and Two Take Away's
  • 6.6.1 Wrap-Up: The Radical Approach
  • 6.6.2 The Take Away's for Policy Makers
  • 6.6.3 The Take Away's at the Level of Society
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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