Handbook of Adolescent Development

 
 
Psychology Press
  • erscheint ca. am 12. Oktober 2020
  • |
  • 434 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-135-53352-6 (ISBN)
 

Handbook of Adolescent Development fills a gap in the literature on adolescent development and behaviour: all of the authors of the various chapters were invited to include as many findings on European adolescents as possible. Through this specific emphasis, the handbook provides a complement to other reviews of the literature that are mostly based on North American samples.

The contributors are all eminent researchers in the field and the individual chapters cover their specific areas of expertise. Theories of adolescence, along with emotional, physical and cognitive issues, are explored. Topics covered include families, peer relations, school and leisure time, as well as problem areas such as depression, drug consumption and delinquency. Handbook of Adolescent Development also incorporates a comprehensive review of the literature in the area and considers avenues for future research.

This multidisciplinary text will be of interest to those studying and researching in the fields of developmental psychology, sociology, demography, epidemiology and criminology.

  • Englisch
  • London
  • |
  • Großbritannien
7 schwarz-weiße Zeichnungen, 6 schwarz-weiße Tabellen
978-1-135-53352-6 (9781135533526)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Table of Contents
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • 1 Adolescent development: Putting Europe on the map
  • 1. Boundaries of adolescence
  • 2. Europe: An old continent and an emergent reality
  • 3. Cross-cultural comparisons of adolescent development
  • 4. Globalization of adolescent research
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 2 Theories of adolescence
  • 1. Developmental theories: Their role in the history of adolescent psychology
  • 2. Four classical types of theory on adolescence
  • 3. Integrative approaches
  • 4. Contextualist theories
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 3 Pubertal maturation
  • 1. Somatic changes
  • 2. Psychosocial aspects of pubertal maturation
  • 3. Conclusion
  • 4 Emotion, affect, and loneliness in adolescence
  • 1. Adolescent emotions
  • 2. Adolescent loneliness and solitude
  • 3. Integrating research on adolescent loneliness and solitude: A European research program
  • 4. Socio-cultural differences in loneliness
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 5 Cognitive development in adolescence: Thinking freed from concrete constraints
  • 1. New cognitive skills in the transition from childhood to adolescence
  • 2. Cognitive analysis of developmental domains in adolescence
  • 3. In search of explanations and theoretical frameworks
  • 4. Conclusion
  • 6 Self-concept, self-esteem and identity
  • Introduction
  • 1. Self-concept and self-esteem
  • 2. Identity
  • 3. Conclusion
  • 7 Moral development in adolescence: How to integrate personal and social values?
  • 1. Assessment methods and general stages
  • 2. Sequential aspects of the general stages
  • 3. Context variabilities and differentiation between several rule systems
  • 4. Inter-individual differences
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 8 The many faces of adolescent autonomy: Parent-adolescent conflict, behavioral decision-making, and emotional distancing
  • 1. Three types of autonomy
  • 2. Behavioral autonomy
  • 3. Emotional autonomy: the "detachment debate"
  • 4. Linking behavioral and emotional autonomy
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 9 Families and adolescents
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Families in Europe
  • 3. Family relationships and adolescence
  • 4. Family systems and adolescence
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 10 Peer relations in adolescence
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Friendships: characteristics, dynamics, and effects
  • 3. Peer groups and youth subculture
  • 4. Social status
  • 5. Bullying and victimization
  • 6. Parent-adolescent and peer relationships
  • 7. Conclusion
  • 11 Sexuality and intimate relationships in adolescence
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Romantic relationships in adolescence
  • 3. Adolescent sexual activity
  • 4. Preventive behavior and risk taking
  • 5. Adolescent pregnancy and abortion
  • 6. Conclusion
  • 12 Adolescents in school
  • 1. Aims of schooling and historical changes
  • 2. Structure of schooling
  • 3. Academic learning
  • 4. Social learning
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 13 Youth and leisure: A European perspective
  • 1. Leisure lifestyles and the economic situation in Europe
  • 2. 'Types' of leisure
  • 3. Leisure transitions
  • 4. Ethnic and cultural influences on leisure
  • 5. Gender and leisure
  • 6. Processes and mechanisms
  • 7. Conclusion
  • 14 Adolescents' relationships to institutional order
  • 1. Institutions in the social world of young people
  • 2. Components of orientation toward institutional authorities
  • 3. School experience and orientation towards formal institutions
  • 4. Peer groups
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 15 Health-related behavior: Current situation, trends, and prevention
  • 1. Adolescents and their health
  • 2. Adolescent lifestyles and health-related behaviour
  • 3. Conclusion
  • 16 Depression and suicide
  • 1. Depression in adolescence
  • 2. Suicide in adolescence
  • 3. Considerations for prevention and treatment
  • 4. Conclusion
  • 17 Epidemiology and psychosocial risk factors associated with adolescent drug consumption
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Epidemiological studies on licit and illicit drug consumption in childhood and adolescence in Europe
  • 3. Factors associated with drug consumption: A biopsychosocial approach
  • 4. Applying constructs from the biopsychosocial model to initiation and continued drug use
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 18 Development of aggression and its linkages with violence and juvenile delinquency
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. A developmental approach
  • 3. What is aggression? Notes on terminology
  • 4. Development of aggression
  • 5. Delinquency in adolescence
  • 6. Developmental trajectories of aggression and violence
  • 7. Predicting development in adolescence from "risk" and "protective" factors
  • 8. Causal mechanisms in theories on juvenile (delinquent) violence
  • 9. Conclusion
  • Author index
  • Subject index

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