2D Materials

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 358 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804337-0 (ISBN)
 

2D Materials contains the latest information on the current frontier of nanotechnology, the thinnest form of materials to ever occur in nature. A little over 10 years ago, this was a completely unknown area, not thought to exist. However, since then, graphene has been isolated and acclaimed, and a whole other class of atomically thin materials, dominated by surface effects and showing completely unexpected and extraordinary properties has been created.

This book is ideal for a variety of readers, including those seeking a high-level overview or a very detailed and critical analysis. No nanotechnologist can currently overlook this new class of materials.


  • Presents one of the first detailed books on this subject of nanotechnology
  • Contains contributions from a great line-up of authoritative contributors that bring together theory and experiments
  • Ideal for a variety of readers, including those seeking a high-level overview or a very detailed and critical analysis
0080-8784
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 21,42 MB
978-0-12-804337-0 (9780128043370)
0128043377 (0128043377)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • 2D Materials
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • 1. Historical: Graphene as the ``Father´´ of 2D Materials
  • 2. Has Graphene Disappointed?
  • 3. Interest and Specificity of 2D Materials
  • 4. Semiconductors, Semimetals ... and Insulators
  • 5. Challenges and Opportunities, from Hype to Hope
  • References
  • Chapter One: 2D Structures Beyond Graphene: The Brave New World of Layered Materials and How Computers Can Help Discover Them
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Third-Generation Materials
  • 3. van der Waals Forces
  • 3.1. (Non)additivity of Atom-Wise vdW Forces
  • 3.2. Lifshitz Theory and Beyond
  • 3.2.1. Layer Response Theory
  • 3.2.2. Weird Asymptotic Results
  • 4. Calculation of 2D Materials
  • 4.1. Energetic Properties
  • 4.1.1. Conventional Semi-local Approximations
  • 4.1.2. van der Waals Approximations
  • 4.2. RPA Calculations
  • 4.2.1. Benchmarking via RPA
  • 4.3. Computational Material Discovery of New Two-Dimensional Compounds
  • 5. The Future Role of Computers
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Efficient Multiscale Lattice Simulations of Strained and Disordered Graphene
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Models
  • 2.1. Disorder-Free Models
  • 2.1.1. Graphene
  • 2.1.2. Bilayer Graphene
  • 2.1.3. Graphene on Boron Nitride
  • 2.2. Disorder Models
  • 3. Large-Scale Simulation Methodologies
  • 3.1. Wave Packet Evolution and Lanczos Recursion Technique
  • 3.2. Chebyshev Polynomial Expansion Methods
  • 3.2.1. The Kernel Polynomial Method
  • 3.2.2. The Chebyshev Polynomial Green´s Function Method
  • 3.2.3. Efficient Calculation of Chebyshev Moments
  • 3.2.4. Graphene with Random Vacancies as Benchmark Example
  • 4. Results
  • 4.1. Graphene
  • 4.1.1. Strain vs Long-Range Disorder
  • 4.2. Graphene on hBN
  • 4.2.1. Hofstadter and Wannier Diagrams
  • 4.2.2. Transport Properties
  • 4.2.3. Sublattice Asymmetric Disorder
  • 4.3. Bilayer Graphene
  • 4.4. Bilayer Graphene on hBN
  • 4.5. Encapsulated Bilayer Graphene
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Three: 2D Boron Nitride: Synthesis and Applications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Structure and Properties of 2D Boron Nitride
  • 2.1. Structual Properties
  • 2.2. Thermal Stability
  • 3. Synthesis of BNNS
  • 3.1. Mechanical Exfoliation
  • 3.2. Solvent-Assisted Ultrasonication
  • 3.3. Acid Exfoliation
  • 3.4. Chemical Functionalization of h-BN
  • 3.4.1. Noncovalent Functionalization
  • 3.4.2. Ionic Functionalization (or Lewis Acid-Base Interactions)
  • 3.4.3. Covalent Functionalization
  • 3.5. Unzipping of BNNTs
  • 3.6. Single and Few-Layer h-BN via CVD
  • 3.7. Defect Manipulation in h-BN Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
  • 4. Applications for 2D h-BN Atomic Layers
  • 4.1. Dielectrics in Next-Generation Nanoelectronic Devices
  • 4.2. Vertical Tunneling Device and Behavior
  • 4.3. h-BN in Protective Coatings
  • 4.4. h-BN in Gas Sensing
  • 4.5. h-BN as Filler for Binder-Free Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries
  • 4.6. Hyperbolicity in h-BN
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Elemental Group IV Two-Dimensional Materials Beyond Graphene
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Bare Silicene and Germanene
  • 2.1. Free-Standing Properties: Theory
  • 2.1.1. Structural Properties
  • 2.1.2. Electronic Properties
  • 2.1.3. Phonons
  • 2.1.4. Mechanical Properties
  • 2.1.5. Thermal Properties
  • 2.2. Experimental Realization of Epitaxial Silicene and Germanene
  • 2.2.1. Epitaxial Silicene
  • 2.2.2. Epitaxial Germanene
  • 2.3. Theoretical Studies of Silicene on Substrates
  • 3. Functionalized Silicene and Germanene
  • 3.1. Experimental Functionalization
  • 3.2. Functionalized Silicene: Theory
  • 4. First Silicene Field Effect Transistors
  • 5. Future Applications
  • 6. Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Synthesis, Properties, and Stacking of Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
  • 1. Synthesis of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
  • 2. Chemical Exfoliation
  • 3. Physical Vapor Deposition and Ion Exchange
  • 4. Thermolysis and PV
  • 5. Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition
  • 6. Molecular Beam Epitaxy
  • 7. Heterostructures Built on vdW Crystals
  • 8. Mechanically Exfoliated vdW Heterostructures
  • 9. Rotationally Dependent Optoelectrical Properties in vdW Heterostructures
  • 10. Interface Imperfection in Mechanically Exfoliated vdW Heterostructures
  • 11. Synthetic vdW Heterostructures
  • 12. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Advances in 2D Materials for Electronic Devices
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Why 2D?
  • 2. 2D Materials in FETs
  • 2.1. FETs and Basic Electrical Characterization
  • 2.2. Comparison of Performance Metrics
  • 2.3. Important Results/Findings
  • 2.3.1. Graphene
  • 2.3.2. Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
  • 2.3.3. Phosphorene
  • 2.3.4. Silicene
  • 2.4. Experimental Considerations
  • 3. 2D Materials in Logic Circuits
  • 3.1. Inverters and the Beginning of 2D Integrated Logic Circuits
  • 3.2. More Complex Logic Circuits
  • 4. 2D Materials in RF Applications
  • 4.1. RF Requirements: Device Physics
  • 4.2. RF FET Devices
  • 4.3. RF Circuit Demonstrations
  • 4.4. RF Circuit Design Considerations
  • 5. Novel Devices and Operating Mechanisms
  • 5.1. Tunneling Devices in 2D Materials
  • 5.2. Valleytronics in 2D Materials
  • 5.3. 2D Materials Memristors
  • 5.4. vdW Heterostructures
  • 6. Conclusions and Perspectives
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Black Phosphorus-Based Nanodevices
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Isolation of Ultrathin Black Phosphorus
  • 3. Thickness-Dependent Band Gap
  • 4. In-Plane Anisotropic Electrical, Mechanical, and Optical Properties
  • 5. Nanodevices Based on Black Phosphorus
  • 5.1. Field-Effect Transistors
  • 5.2. PN Junctions
  • 5.2.1. Electrostatically Gated
  • 5.2.2. van der Waals Heterostructures
  • 5.3. Nanoelectromechanical Resonators
  • 5.4. Photodetectors
  • 5.5. Logic Circuits
  • 5.6. Thermoelectric Generator
  • 6. Future Challenges: Isolation and Stability
  • 7. Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Index
  • Contents of Volumes in this Series
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

208,25 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok