Transportation Planning Handbook

 
 
John Wiley & Sons Inc (Verlag)
  • 4. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Juli 2016
  • |
  • 1200 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-76240-0 (ISBN)
 
A multi-disciplinary approach to transportation planningfundamentals
The Transportation Planning Handbook is a comprehensive,practice-oriented reference that presents the fundamental conceptsof transportation planning alongside proven techniques. This newfourth edition is more strongly focused on serving the needs of allusers, the role of safety in the planning process, andtransportation planning in the context of societal concerns,including the development of more sustainable transportationsolutions. The content structure has been redesigned with a newformat that promotes a more functionally driven multimodal approachto planning, design, and implementation, including guidance towardthe latest tools and technology. The material has been updated toreflect the latest changes to major transportation resources suchas the HCM, MUTCD, HSM, and more, including the most current ADAaccessibility regulations.
Transportation planning has historically followed the rationalplanning model of defining objectives, identifying problems,generating and evaluating alternatives, and developing plans.Planners are increasingly expected to adopt a moremulti-disciplinary approach, especially in light of the risingimportance of sustainability and environmental concerns. This bookpresents the fundamentals of transportation planning in amultidisciplinary context, giving readers a practical reference forday-to-day answers.
* Serve the needs of all users
* Incorporate safety into the planning process
* Examine the latest transportation planning softwarepackages
* Get up to date on the latest standards, recommendations, andcodes
Developed by The Institute of Transportation Engineers, thisbook is the culmination of over seventy years of transportationplanning solutions, fully updated to reflect the needs of achanging society. For a comprehensive guide with practical answers,The Transportation Planning Handbook is an essentialreference.
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978-1-118-76240-0 (9781118762400)
1118762401 (1118762401)
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THE INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS (ITE) Founded in 1930, ITE is a community of nearly 13,000 transportation professionals including transportation engineers, transportation planners, consultants, educators, and researchers working in more than 90 countries.
MICHAEL D. MEYER is a Senior Advisor for WSP/Parsons Brinckerhoff, Inc. For 30 years he was a professor of civil engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has published over 200 papers/books on transportation planning and is considered a leading authority on transportation systems. Dr. Meyer has advised numerous countries, states and regions on transportation planning issues.
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Editor
  • Chapter 1 Introduction to Transportation Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Organization of This Handbook
  • III. The Transportation Planning Process
  • A. Major Steps in Transportation Planning
  • B. Linkage to Policy and Other Planning Efforts
  • IV. Changing Context for Transportation Planning
  • V. Additional Sources of Information
  • VI. Summary
  • VII. References
  • Chapter 2 Travel Characteristics and Data
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Transportation System Characteristics
  • A. Functional Classification
  • B. System Extent
  • C. System Use
  • D. System Performance
  • III. Urban Travel Characteristics
  • A. Population Characteristics
  • B. Travel Characteristics
  • IV. Estimating Travel Characteristics and Volumes
  • A. Road Traffic Data Definitions
  • B. Traffic Count Techniques
  • C. Data Collection Standards
  • D. Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS)
  • E. Travel Time Studies
  • F. Travel Surveys
  • G. Parking Needs Studies
  • V. Modal Studies
  • A. Transit Studies
  • B. Pedestrian Studies
  • C. Goods Movement Studies
  • VI. Statistical Considerations
  • VII. Summary
  • VIII. References
  • Chapter 3 Land Use and Urban Design
  • I. Introduction
  • II. What Drives Development and Resulting Urban Form?
  • A. Regional Planning and Provision of Public Infrastructure
  • B. Local Governmental Planning and Development Regulation
  • C. Private Developers and Financial Lenders
  • III. Urban Form
  • IV. Urban Design
  • V. Land-Use Forecasting and Transportation Planning
  • A. Population and Employment Forecasting
  • B. Interrelationship between Land-Use Forecasts and Travel Modeling
  • C. Distributing Population and Employment Among Study Zones
  • VI. Scenario Analysis for Urban Form
  • VII. Highway Facility-Related Strategies
  • A. Access Management
  • B. Context-Sensitive Solutions (CSS)
  • VIII. Summary
  • IX. References
  • Chapter 4 Environmental Considerations
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Environmental Considerations in Transportation Planning and Decision Making
  • A. Sustainability
  • B. Environmental Considerations at the Systems Level
  • C. Environmental Impacts in Project Development
  • D. Linking Environmental Considerations of Systems Planning and Project Development
  • III. General Principles Regarding Environmental Content and Level of Detail
  • A. Types of Impacts
  • B. Appropriate Level of Detail
  • C. Extent of Impact
  • D. Role of Travel Demand Forecasting and Traffic Analysis
  • IV. Land Use and Economic Development Impacts
  • A. Land-Use Impact Analysis
  • B. Consistency with Planning and Zoning
  • C. Impacts on Services and Tax Base
  • D. Impacts on Transportation Systems
  • E. Economic Impacts
  • V. Social and Community Impacts
  • A. Community Disruptions
  • B. Noise and Vibration
  • C. Neighborhood Cohesion
  • D. Neighborhood Quality
  • E. Access to Community Facilities and Services
  • F. Environmental Justice
  • G. Public Health/Active Living
  • H. Historic, Cultural, and Parkland Resources
  • VI. Natural Resource Impacts
  • A. Air Quality
  • B. Energy
  • C. Water Quality
  • D. Navigable Waterways and Coastal Zones
  • E. Climate Change and Extreme Weather
  • F. Impacts on the Natural Environment
  • G. Endangered and Threatened Species
  • VII. Construction Impacts
  • VIII. Considering Mitigation Strategies during the Systems Planning Process
  • A. Documentation of Environmental Considerations during the Systems Planning Process
  • IX. Summary
  • X. References
  • Credits
  • Chapter 5 Transportation Finance and Funding
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Key Concepts and Terms
  • III. Sources of Transportation Funding
  • A. Motor Fuel and Excise Taxes
  • B. Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Fees or Mileage-Based User Fees
  • C. Tolls
  • D. Cordon or Area Pricing, and Parking Charges
  • E. Value Capture
  • F. Other Taxes
  • IV. Transportation Finance Strategies
  • V. Public/Private Partnerships
  • VI. Investment Programming and Revenue Estimation
  • A. State/Transportation Improvement Program (S/TIP)
  • B. Estimating Revenues
  • C. Estimating Costs of Capital Projects
  • D. Estimating Costs for Operations and Maintenance
  • VII. Environmental Justice Analysis
  • VIII. Future Challenges
  • IX. Summary
  • X. References
  • Chapter 6 Travel Demand and Network Modeling
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Modeling Travel Demand
  • A. Brief Historical Perspective
  • B. Principles and Concepts
  • C. Travel Demand Model Applications
  • D. Model Zones and Networks
  • E. Model Calibration and Validation
  • III. Demand Models and Tools
  • A. Demand Elasticity Analysis
  • B. Travel Demand Models
  • C. Linkage to Air Quality Modeling
  • D. Software
  • IV. Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • V. References
  • Chapter 7 Evaluation and Prioritization Methods
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Characteristics of the Evaluation Process
  • A. Basic Concepts
  • B. Evaluation Techniques
  • C. Prioritization and Programming of Projects
  • III. Case Studies
  • A. MPO Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)
  • B. Corridor Plan
  • C. Small Bus Life-Cycle Cost Analysis
  • D. One-Way Street Conversion in a Central Business District
  • E. Rail Transit Projects
  • IV. Summary
  • V. References
  • Chapter 8 Asset Management
  • I. Introduction
  • II. What Is Transportation Asset Management?
  • III. Recent U.S. History of Transportation Asset Management
  • A. Early Asset Management-Related Legislation
  • B. Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) 34
  • C. International Asset Management Scanning Tour
  • D. Domestic Asset Management Scanning Tour
  • E. TAM Asset Management Guide
  • F. MAP-21 and Asset Management Regulations
  • IV. Asset Management and Transportation Planning
  • A. Vision, Goals and Objectives
  • B. Performance Measures
  • C. Data Needs
  • D. Analysis Methods and Tools
  • E. Evaluation and Prioritization
  • F. Monitoring System Condition and Performance
  • V. Asset Management Challenges and Opportunities
  • A. Expanding Information Management Capabilities
  • B. Public-Private Partnerships
  • C. Outsourcing Contracts
  • D. Funding Constraints and Pressures for New Infrastructure Capacity
  • E. Multimodal Trade-Offs
  • F. Infrastructure Renewal
  • VI. Summary
  • VII. References
  • Chapter 9 Road and Highway Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Best Practice for Urban Roadway Systems
  • III. Context-Sensitive Solutions (CSS)
  • IV. Traffic Calming
  • V. Green Roads
  • VI. Complete Streets
  • VII. System Performance and Capacity Measures
  • A. Traditional Measures
  • B. Multimodal Performance Measures
  • VIII. Condition Measures and Management Systems
  • A. Pavement Management Systems
  • B. Bridge Management Systems
  • C. Road or Road Inventory Management System
  • D. Maintenance Management Systems
  • IX. State Highway Plans and City Thoroughfare Plans
  • A. Minnesota DOT State Highway Investment Plan
  • B. Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) Strategic Thoroughfare Plan
  • X. Road Investment Programs and Performance Monitoring
  • XI. Summary
  • XII. References
  • Chapter 10 Transportation System Management and Operations
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Understanding Network and Facility Performance
  • A. Road Congestion
  • B. Travel Time Reliability
  • III. Planning and Organizing for TSM&O
  • A. Planning for Operations
  • B. Regional Concept for Operations
  • C. Organizational Capacity
  • IV. Active Transportation and Demand Management
  • V. Examples of Management and Operations (M&O) Strategies
  • A. Emergency Transportation Operations
  • B. Facilitating Integrated ITS Deployment
  • C. Freeway Management
  • D. Regional Signal Coordination and Management
  • E. Traffic Incident Management
  • F. Special Events
  • G. Some TSM&O Program Examples
  • VI. Linking Transportation Planning and Planning for Operations
  • A. System Operations Stakeholders and Institutional Structures
  • B. Goals and Objectives
  • C. Performance Measures
  • D. Data Collection and Sharing
  • E. Operations-Oriented Analysis Tools
  • F. M&O Strategies Included in the Plan and TIP
  • G. Shared Funding and Resources
  • VII. Dissemination of Operations Data
  • VIII. The Connected Transportation System
  • A. Autonomous Vehicles
  • B. Vehicle-to-Vehicle Technologies
  • C. Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Technologies
  • IX. Summary
  • X. References
  • Chapter 11 Planning for Parking
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Parking Management Organizations
  • A. Types of Parking Organizations
  • III. Zoning Requirements
  • A. Minimums or Maxima?
  • B. Flexibility in Zoning Requirements
  • IV. Strategies and Decisions for Parking Supply Options
  • A. Parking Strategy Concepts
  • B. Community and Parking Program Goals
  • C. Performance Measures and Definitions
  • D. Facility Location and Urban Design
  • V. Parking Management
  • A. Pricing
  • B. On-Street Parking
  • C. Enforcement and Adjudication
  • D. Off-Street Supply Actions
  • VI. Parking Demand and Needs Analysis
  • A. Definitions
  • B. Parking Demand Formulas
  • C. Sensitivity of Parking Recommendations
  • D. Reducing Parking Demand
  • VII. Common Land Uses
  • A. Airports
  • B. Intermodal Parking
  • C. Residential Uses
  • D. Hotels
  • E. Recreational and Entertainment Uses
  • F. Educational Institutions
  • G. Medical Institutions
  • H. Convention Centers
  • I. Office Space
  • J. Retail Space
  • K. Eating and Drinking Establishments
  • VIII. Shared Parking Methodology
  • A. Captive Market
  • IX. Parking Costs
  • A. Capital Costs
  • B. Operating Costs
  • C. Combined Costs
  • D. Parking Scenario Comparisons
  • X. Financing Parking Facilities
  • A. Types of Public Financing
  • B. Tax-Exempt Bond Requirements
  • C. Sizing a Bond Issue
  • XI. Summary
  • XII. References
  • Chapter 12 Transit Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Ownership and Governance
  • A. Local Agency
  • B. Transit Authority or District
  • C. Cooperative Arrangements
  • D. Privatization
  • III. Contemporary Transit in North America
  • A. Ridership
  • B. Trip Lengths and Operating Speeds
  • IV. Classification of Transit Modes and Their Components
  • A. Definition of Transit Modes
  • B. Bus Transit Modes
  • C. Rail and Other Guided Modes
  • D. Paratransit and Specialized Services
  • E. Terrain-Specialized Systems
  • F. Waterborne Transit
  • V. Transit Cost Structures
  • VI. System Performance and Quality of Service
  • A. Quality of Service for Passengers
  • B. Measures of Transit System Effectiveness from the Operator's Perspective
  • C. Transit Impacts on Development
  • VII. Transit Planning Procedures
  • A. Strategic Planning
  • B. Comprehensive Operations (or Operational) Analysis
  • C. Long-Range Transit Planning
  • D. Mode and Technology Selection
  • VIII. Planning for Passenger Stations
  • A. Vision for a Passenger Station
  • B. Market Research (Demand Estimation)
  • C. Performance Analysis Techniques
  • D. Life-Cycle Planning
  • E. Security
  • F. Information Systems
  • IX. Station Design
  • A. Design Parameters and Guidelines
  • B. Bus Stations/Stops
  • C. Rail Stations/Stops
  • D. Waterborne Stations
  • E. Multimodal Stations
  • X. Lines. and Networks
  • A. Types and Characteristics of Lines
  • B. Network Design
  • C. The Role of Transfers in Transit Networks
  • XI. Transit Route Planning
  • A. Vehicle Motion and Travel Times
  • B. Planning Considerations Influencing Scheduling and Operations
  • XII. Future Transit Issues
  • A. Transit Financing
  • B. Service Branding
  • C. Role of the Private Sector
  • D. Taxation and Pricing Changes
  • E. Advancements in Technology
  • XIII. Summary
  • XIV. References
  • Chapter 13 Planning for Pedestrians and Bicyclists
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Goals and Benchmarks for Pedestrian and Bicycle Planning
  • A. Pedestrian and Bicycle Trips as Alternative Modes of Transportation
  • B. Walking and Bicycling for Healthy Lifestyles
  • C. Less Costly Travel
  • D. Environmentally-Friendly Travel Modes
  • III. Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety
  • IV. Evolution of Pedestrian and Bicycle Planning in the United States
  • A. Early History
  • B. Beginning of Formal Planning Efforts
  • C. Recent Interest
  • D. State, Regional, and Local Programs
  • E. Important Considerations in Today's Planning Environment
  • V. Pedestrian and Bicyclist Planning
  • A. Understanding the Context and Problem
  • B. Developing Vision/Goals/Objectives/Performance Measures
  • C. Analyzing Walking and Bicycling Alternatives
  • D. Prioritizing Projects/Strategies
  • E. Producing Planning Products
  • F. Monitoring Plan Progress
  • VI. Pedestrian and Bicyclist Planning/Design Issues
  • A. Bicycle Network/Facility Design
  • B. Pedestrian Network/Facility Design
  • VII. Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation in Asia and Europe
  • VIII. Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • IX. References
  • Chapter 14 Travel Demand Management
  • I. Introduction
  • II. TDM Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures
  • III. TDM Strategies
  • A. Improve Transportation Options
  • B. Incentives
  • C. Land-Use Management
  • D. Implementation Programs
  • IV. Potential Impacts of TDM Strategies
  • V. Data, Model Use, and Results
  • VI. Summary
  • VII. References
  • Chapter 15 Statewide Transportation Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. The Role of the Federal Government
  • III. Statewide Transportation Planning
  • A. Defining the Study Focus and Boundary
  • B. Identifying Transportation Issues and Opportunities
  • C. Formulating a Vision, Goals, and Objectives
  • D. Identifying and Using System Performance Measures
  • E. Needs Assessment
  • F. Analyzing Transportation System Alternatives
  • G. Evaluating Transportation System Alternatives
  • H. Prioritizing Programs and Projects
  • I. Monitoring System and Program Performance
  • IV. Statewide Modal Plans
  • V. Summary-Continuing State Planning Challenges
  • VI. References
  • Chapter 16 Metropolitan Transportation Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Legislative Context for U.S. Metropolitan Transportation Planning
  • A. The Early Years
  • B. Toward a Balanced Transportation System
  • C. The Modern Era
  • D. Era of Performance-Oriented Decision Making
  • III. Institutional Structure for Metropolitan Transportation Planning
  • A. Core Characteristics of an MPO
  • B. MPO Planning Products
  • IV. The Transportation Planning Process
  • A. Basic Principles
  • B. Defining Study Boundaries
  • C. Identifying Transportation Issues and Opportunities
  • D. Formulating a Vision, Goals, and Objectives
  • E. Identifying and Using System Performance Measures
  • F. Collecting and Analyzing Land-Use, System Performance, and Condition Data
  • G. Analyzing Transportation System Alternatives
  • H. Evaluating Transportation System Alternatives
  • I. Prioritizing Projects and Program Development
  • V. Monitoring System and Program Performance
  • VI. Public Engagement
  • VII. Special Topics for Metropolitan Transportation Planning
  • A. Congestion Management Process (CMP)
  • B. Security
  • C. Safety
  • D. Management, Operations, and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)
  • E. Freight Mobility
  • F. Asset Management
  • G. Environmental Justice
  • H. Travel Demand Management
  • VIII. Summary
  • IX. References
  • Chapter 17 Corridor Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Nature of Corridor Transportation Planning
  • A. Types of Corridor Plans
  • B. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
  • C. Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)
  • D. Statewide Transportation Plans
  • E. Relationship to Land Use/Urban Design
  • III. Corridor Selection
  • IV. Corridor Planning Approach
  • A. Identify Vision, Goals, Objectives, and Evaluation Criteria (Related to Performance Measures)
  • B. Collecting and Analyzing System Performance and Condition Data
  • C. Identifying and Analyzing Alternatives
  • D. Evaluating Alternatives
  • E. Corridor Study Outcomes
  • F. Access Management
  • G. Environmental Process
  • H. Public Engagement
  • V. Corridor Management Plans
  • A. Managing Corridor System Performance
  • B. Enhancing Scenic and Historic Characteristics of Scenic Corridors
  • VI. Summary
  • VII. References
  • Chapter 18 Local and Activity Center Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Local Transportation Planning
  • A. Challenges, Problems, and Opportunities
  • B. Define the Study Area
  • C. Goals, Objectives, and Performance Metrics
  • D. Existing Conditions Data
  • E. Future System Performance and Condition
  • F. Evaluation and Prioritization
  • G. Other Actions and Strategies
  • III. Activity Centers
  • A. Characteristics and Concepts
  • B. Central Business Districts (CBDs)
  • C. Suburban Activity Centers (SACs)
  • IV. Implementation of Transportation Plans
  • V. Summary
  • VI. References
  • Chapter 19 Site Planning and Impact Analysis
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Administrative Requirements
  • III. Definition of Key Terms
  • IV. Site Plan Review Data
  • V. Transportation Access and Impact Analysis
  • A. Traffic Impact Analysis Process
  • B. Study Area Boundaries
  • C. Horizon Years
  • D. Data on Existing (Background) Conditions
  • E. Performance Measures
  • F. Travel Demand Analysis
  • VI. Analysis Procedures
  • A. Choice of Models or Tools
  • B. Intersections
  • C. Corridors
  • D. Network/Capacity Analysis
  • VII. On-Site Transportation Elements
  • A. Internal Circulation
  • B. Parking Management
  • C. Access Management
  • VIII. Implementation Actions/Strategies
  • A. Applications and Permits
  • B. Transportation Management Associations
  • C. Transportation Management Plan (TMP)
  • IX. Report Organization
  • X. Summary
  • XI. References
  • Chapter 20 Rural Community and Tribal Nation Planning
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Rural Transportation Planning
  • A. Context
  • B. Legislative Requirements
  • C. The Job of Rural Transportation Planners
  • D. The Rural Transportation Planning Process
  • III. Tribal Nations
  • A. Context
  • B. Legislative Requirements
  • C. The Job of Tribal Nation Planners
  • D. Transportation Planning for Tribal Nations
  • IV. Summary
  • V. References
  • Chapter 21 Recreational Areas
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Characteristics of Recreational Travel
  • III. Characteristics of Transportation Systems Serving Recreational Areas
  • A. Modes of Travel
  • B. Peak Travel Activity
  • C. Travel Companions and Vehicle Occupancy
  • D. One-Way Transportation
  • IV. Transportation-Related Characteristics of Visitors to Recreational Areas
  • A. Time Sensitivity
  • B. Cost
  • C. Service Flexibility
  • D. Personal Belongings
  • E. Information Needs
  • F. Safety
  • V. Transportation Planning for Recreational Areas
  • A. Partnering and Public Participation
  • B. Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures
  • C. Ecological Impacts and Benchmarks
  • D. Analysis and Evaluation of Strategies and Actions
  • E. System Needs and Recommendations
  • F. Infrastructure
  • G. Transit Service
  • H. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)
  • I. Demand Management
  • J. Supporting Policies
  • K. Additional Types of Studies
  • VI. Need for Information and Communication
  • A. Communication with the Visiting Public
  • B. Communication with the Local Community
  • VII. Summary
  • VIII. References
  • Chapter 22 Integrating Freight into the Transportation Planning Process
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Overview of Domestic Freight Flows
  • A. Trucking
  • B. Rail
  • C. Inland Water and Maritime
  • D. Air Cargo
  • E. Pipelines
  • F. Intermodal Freight
  • III. Impact of Freight Flows on the Community, Freight Sector, and Transportation System
  • A. Community Impacts
  • B. Impacts on the Freight Sector
  • C. Transportation System Impacts
  • IV. Freight Planning
  • A. Institutional Structure
  • B. Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures
  • C. System Designation
  • D. Data Collection and Analysis
  • E. Needs Analysis and Models
  • F. Evaluation and Prioritization of Freight Strategies
  • V. Freight Terminals
  • A. Truck Terminals
  • B. Freight Rail Terminals
  • C. TOFC and COFC
  • D. Intermodal Yards
  • E. Freight Multimodal Terminals
  • VI. Summary
  • VII. References
  • Chapter 23 Planning It Safe-Safety Considerations in the Transportation Planning Process
  • I. Introduction
  • II. U.S. National Statistics
  • III. Institutional and Policy Structure in the United States
  • IV. Laying the Groundwork for Transportation Safety Planning
  • V. Incorporating Safety into Transportation Planning
  • A. Establish Multidisciplinary Coordination with Transportation and Safety Stakeholders
  • B. Incorporate Safety into the Vision, Goals, and Objectives
  • C. Develop Safety Performance Measures and Targets
  • D. Collect and Analyze Crash Data
  • E. Analyze and Evaluate Transportation Safety
  • F. Make Safety a Decision Factor
  • G. Include Safety in Planning Programs and Documents
  • VI. The Highway Safety Manual (HSM)
  • VII. Relationship between Transportation Safety Planning and Strategic Highway Safety Planning
  • VIII. Lessons from the International Community
  • IX. Summary
  • X. References
  • Chapter 24 Public Participation and Engagement
  • I. Introduction
  • II. What Is the Public Participation Process?
  • A. Legislative and Regulatory Requirements
  • III. Know Your Public and Stakeholders
  • IV. Public Participation Plan
  • A. Public Participation Goals and Objectives
  • V. Public Participation Methods and Approaches
  • VI. Evolving Role of Technology and Social Media
  • VII. Public Participation and Project Development
  • VIII. How to Measure Effectiveness
  • IX. Words of Wisdom
  • X. Summary
  • XI. References
  • Index
  • EULA

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