The Handbook of Measurement Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 13. April 2016
  • |
  • 600 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-86864-5 (ISBN)
 
This volume of the series was designed to provide a comprehensive primer on the existing best practices and emerging developments in the study and design research on crime and criminology. The work as a whole includes chapters on the measurement of criminal typologies, the offenders, offending and victimization, criminal justice organizations, and specialized measurement techniques. Each chapter is written by experts in the field and they provide an excellent survey of the literature in the relevant area. More importantly, each chapter provides a description of the various methodological and substantive challenges presented in conducting research on these issues and denotes possible solutions to these dilemmas. An emphasis was placed on research that has been conducted outside of the United States and was designed to give the reader a broader more global understanding of the social context of research.
The goal of this volume is to provide a definitive reference for professionals in the field, researchers, and students. This volume in the Handbooks in Criminology and Criminal Justice series identifies the principal topical areas of research in this field and summarizes the various methodological and substantive challenges presented in conducting research on these issues. In each chapter, authors provide a summary of the prominent data collection efforts in the topical area, provide an overview of the current methodological work, discuss the challenges in the measurement of central concepts in the subject area, and identify new horizons emerging in data collection and measurement. We encouraged authors to discuss work conducted in an international context and to incorporate discussion of qualitative methodologies when appropriate.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons
  • 4,90 MB
978-1-118-86864-5 (9781118868645)
1118868641 (1118868641)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Dr. Beth M. Huebner is a Professor and Director of Graduate Programs in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Her research interests include prisoner reentry, criminal justice decision making, gendered perspectives on crime and justice, and public policy. She is the author or co-author of several scholarly articles and book chapters, and her work on incarceration and marriage was honored with the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Donal MacNamara Award. She was also given the Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice Wall of Fame: Young Alumni Award.
Dr. Timothy S. Bynum is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. He is the past Director of the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data, (NACJD), at the Inter-university Consortium on Political and Social Research, at the University of Michigan. Professor Bynum's current research includes the study of community-based interventions to reduce gang and gun violence, the implementation and assessment of an innovative neighborhood approach to violence in nine communities, and an assessment of the impact of residency restrictions for sex offenders. He previously conducted research on reentry programs for offenders released from prison, programs to reduce school violence, community based correctional alternatives for both adult and juvenile offenders, and gang intervention programs.
Notes on Contributors vii
Introduction 1
Beth M. Huebner and Timothy S. Bynum
Part I Measurement of Criminal Typologies 7
1 Violent Crime 9
Nicholas Corsaro
2 Cybercrime 29
Thomas J. Holt
3 Juvenile Crime and Bullying 49
Sean P. Varano and Joseph M. McKenna
4 Rape and Other Sexual Offending Behaviors 69
Wesley G. Jennings and Bryanna Hahn Fox
5 White?]Collar and Corporate Crime 92
Michael L. Benson, Jay Kennedy, and Matthew Logan
6 Human Trafficking 111
Amy Farrell and Katherine Bright
7 Challenges in Measuring and Understanding Hate Crime 131
Jack McDevitt and Janice A. Iwama
Part II Offenders, Offending, and Victimization 157
8 Gangs and Gang Crime 159
Chris Melde
9 Gendered Pathways to Crime 181
Julie Yingling
10 Mental Health and Physical Studies 202
Daryl G. Kroner and Maranda Quillen
11 Rehabilitation and Treatment Programming 223
Faye S. Taxman and Brandy L. Blasko
12 Measuring Victimization: Issues and New Directions 249
Leah E. Daigle, Jamie A. Snyder, and Bonnie S. Fisher
Part III Criminal Justice Organizations and Outcomes 277
13 Community Policing and Police Interventions 279
Michael J. Kyle and Joseph A. Schafer
14 Measurement Issues in Criminal Case Processing and Court Decision Making Research 303
Brian D. Johnson and Christina D. Stewart
15 Sentencing Outcomes and Disparity 328
Jared M. Ellison and Pauline K. Brennan
16 Correctional Interventions and Outcomes 351
Eric Grommon and Jason Rydberg
17 How Theory Guides Measurement: Public Attitudes toward Crime and Policing 377
Jonathan Jackson and Jouni Kuha
18 Measuring the Cost of Crime 416
Matt DeLisi
19 School Crime and Safety 434
Thomas Mowen, John Brent, and Aaron Kupchik
20 Traffic Stops, Race, and Measurement 452
Kyle Mclean and Jeff Rojek
Part IV Specialized Measurement Techniques 473
21 Self?]Reported Crime and Delinquency 475
Scott Menard, Lisa C. Bowman?]Bowen, and Yi Fen Lu
22 Crime and the Life Course 496
Lee Ann Slocum
23 Conducting Qualitative Interviews in Prison: Challenges and Lessons Learned 517
Kristin Carbone?]Lopez
24 Spatial Analysis of Crime 535
Steven M. Radil
25 Network Analysis 555
Owen Gallupe
Index 576

Notes on Contributors


Michael L. Benson is professor of criminal justice at the University of Cincinnati. He is a past president of the White-Collar Crime Research Consortium. He has published extensively in the areas of white-collar crime, intimate partner violence, and life-course criminology. With Francis T. Cullen, he authored Combating Corporate Crime: Local Prosecutors at Work, which received the Outstanding Scholarship Award in 2000 from the Crime and Delinquency Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. The second edition of his book Understanding White-Collar Crime: An Opportunity Perspective will be published in 2015. He is currently working on a book on emotions in crime and criminal justice.

Brandy L. Blasko is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at George Mason University. She received her PhD from the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University. Her research focuses on how criminal justice workers and criminal justice-involved individuals perceive, understand, and negotiate formal and informal aspects of the corrections environment.

Lisa C. Bowman-Bowen received her PhD in criminal justice from Sam Houston State University in 2014; she has an MS in criminology from Indiana State University (2004) and BS degrees in criminal justice and behavioral science from Grace College (2000). Her research projects focus on survey methodology and self-report measures, specifically for adolescent and young adult problem behaviors. Her dissertation and publications focus on self-reported substance use and illegal behavior.

Pauline K. Brennan received her PhD in criminal justice from the University at Albany, SUNY, and is an associate professor and the Doctoral Program Chair for the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska Omaha (UNO). She also serves as the director of the London Program for UNO and is the president of the Association of Doctoral Programs in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Her areas of research include inequity in court processing, correctional policy, and issues related to female offenders and victims.

John Brent is assistant professor at Georgia Southern University. His recent work focuses on the cultural and structural dynamics underpinning transgressive and criminal behavior, building a theoretical foundation for criminal justice theory, critically examining school discipline and security, and methodological approaches in criminology. He is the coauthor, with Peter B. Kraska, of Theorizing Criminal Justice: Eight Essential Orientations (2010), and his work can be found in a number of leading peer-reviewed journals, including the British Journal of Criminology, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Journal of Criminal Justice Education.

Katherine Bright is research associate at the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University. Her primary research interests include human trafficking, particularly the commercial sexual exploitation of domestic minors, expectant and parenting youth, and youth partnership models as successful intervention tools. Her recent research has focused on labor trafficking within the US, as well as on the intersection of teen pregnancy, homelessness, and commercial sexual exploitation in Massachusetts.

Timothy S. Bynum, PhD, is professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. He is the former director of the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) at the Inter-University Consortium on Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan. Professor Bynum's current research includes the study of community-based interventions to reduce gang and gun violence, the implementation and assessment of an innovative neighborhood approach to violence in nine communities, and an assessment of the impact of residency restrictions for sex offenders. He previously conducted research on reentry programs for offenders released from prison, programs to reduce school violence, community-based correctional alternatives for both adult and juvenile offenders, and gang intervention programs.

Kristin Carbone-Lopez is associate professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. Her research focuses on gender and the connections between crime and victimization across the life course. Her recent publications appear in Criminology, the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society.

Nicholas Corsaro, PhD, is assistant professor of criminal justice at the University of Cincinnati and research director at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC. Corsaro received his PhD from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. He has served as an external evaluation researcher on a number of local and national strategic policing initiatives; this includes his work on the Indianapolis Violence Reduction Partnership (IVRP), the national Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), gun violence reduction (and evaluation) strategy, and the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence (CIRV) focused deterrence strategy. His research interests focus on strategic partnerships with police agencies in order to identify and target crime problems, research methods, analyses, and evaluation designs intended to examine potential changes in gun, gang, and drug market violence.

Leah E. Daigle, PhD, is associate professor in the Department of Criminal Justice in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. She received her PhD in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati. Her most recent research has centered on repeat sexual victimization of college women and the development and continuation of victimization across the life course. She is coauthor of Criminals in the Making: Criminality Across the Life Course (2nd edn., 2014) and Unsafe in the Ivory Tower: The Sexual Victimization of College Women (2010), which was awarded the 2011 Outstanding Book Award by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and author of Victimology: A Text/Reader and Victimology: The Essentials (2013).

Matt DeLisi is professor and coordinator of criminal justice studies and affiliate with the Center for the Study of Violence at Iowa State University. Professor DeLisi is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Criminal Justice and a fellow of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. The author of more than 250 scholarly publications, Professor DeLisi is one of the most prolific and cited criminologists in the world.

Jared M. Ellison received his MS in criminal justice administration from Niagara University and is a third-year doctoral student in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska, Omaha (UNO). His research interests include court processing, the correctional system, inmate behavior, and community reentry.

Amy Farrell is associate professor of criminology and criminal justice at Northeastern University. Her scholarship seeks to understand arrest, adjudication, and criminal case disposition practices. Her recent research focuses on criminal justice system responses to new crimes such as human trafficking. She has led studies of police responses to human trafficking and state and local prosecution of human trafficking for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). She has testified about police identification of human trafficking before the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee. Farrell was a co-recipient of NIJ's W. E. B. DuBois Fellowship on crime, justice, and culture in 2006.

Bonnie S. Fisher, PhD, is professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. She received her PhD in Political Science from Northwestern University in 1988. She served on the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Measuring Rape and Sexual Assault in Bureau of Justice Statistics Household Surveys during 2011-2013. In 2015 she was the Co-PI (with David Cantor at Westat) working with the American Association of University Campus Climate Survey on the Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct Design Team. Her published articles and chapters span the field of victimology, and her primary research area has been on violence against women, from domestic violence to stalking to sexual assault, with an emphasis on college women. She has coedited and coauthored a number of books, including the Encyclopedia of Victimology and Crime Prevention (2010); The Dark Side of the Ivory Tower: Campus Crime as a Social Problem (2013); Unsafe in the Ivory Tower: The Sexual Victimization of College Women (2010, with Leah Daigle; this book won the 2011 Outstanding Book Award by the ACJS); and Campus Crime: Legal, Social and Policy Perspectives (3rd edn., 2007). In 2015 she coedited a volume entitled Critical Issues on Violence against Women: International Perspectives and Promising Strategies and coauthored a textbook entitled Introduction to Victimology: Contemporary Theory, Research, and Practice.

Bryanna Hahn Fox, PhD, is assistant professor in the Department of Criminology in the College of Behavioral and Community Sciences and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Mental Health Law and Policy at the University of South Florida. She received her doctorate in psychological criminology from the University of Cambridge, England. Her major research...

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