Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 26. Juli 2016
  • |
  • 382 Seiten
 
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978-0-12-801907-8 (ISBN)
 

Equity and Justice in Development Science: Implications for Diverse Young People, Families, and Communities, a two volume set, focuses on the implications of equity and justice (and other relevant concepts) for a myriad of developmental contexts/domains relevant to the lives of young people and families (e.g. education, juvenile justice), also including recommendations for ensuring those contexts serve the needs of all young people and families.

Both volumes bring together a growing body of developmental scholarship that addresses how issues relevant to equity and justice (or their opposites) affect development and developmental outcomes, as well as scholarship focused on mitigating the developmental consequences of inequity, inequality, and injustice for young people, families, and communities.


  • Contains a wide array of topics on equity and justice which are discussed in detail
  • Focuses on mitigating the developmental consequences of inequity, inequality, and injustice for young people, families, and communities
  • Includes chapters that highlight some of the most recent research in the area
  • Serves as an invaluable resource for developmental or educational psychology researchers, scholars, and students
0065-2407
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 6,34 MB
978-0-12-801907-8 (9780128019078)
0128019077 (0128019077)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Preface to Volume 50
  • Chapter One: A Transactional/Ecological Perspective on Ethnic-Racial Identity, Socialization, and Discrimination
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Ethnic-Racial Identity
  • 3. Ethnic-Racial Socialization
  • 4. Ethnic-Racial Discrimination
  • 5. Interrelationships Among Ethnic-Racial Identity, Socialization, and Discrimination
  • 5.1. Summary
  • 6. Conceptualizing Ecological/Transactional Perspectives on Youths' Racial Knowledge
  • 6.1. Families
  • 6.2. Peers
  • 6.3. Schools
  • 6.4. Neighborhoods
  • 7. Summary and Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Racism, Racial Resilience, and African American Youth Development: Person-Centered Analysis as a Tool to Prom ...
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Background
  • 2.1. Racial and Ethnic Identity
  • 2.2. Racial Socialization
  • 3. PCA as a Tool in Resilience Research with African American Youth
  • 4. PCA in Racial and Ethnic Resilience Research: Research Examples
  • 4.1. Racial and Ethnic Identity
  • 4.1.2. Summary
  • 4.2. Racial Socialization
  • 4.2.1. Summary
  • 5. Hybrid Person-Centered Studies
  • 5.1. Summary
  • 6. Challenges and Considerations
  • 7. Future Directions
  • 8. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Helping Children Navigate a Diverse World: Parents Contributions
  • 1. Growing Up in a Diverse World
  • 2. Helping Children Navigate Diverse Contexts
  • 3. Ethnic Minority Parents Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 3.1. Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 3.1.1. Cultural Socialization
  • 3.1.2. Preparation for Bias
  • 3.1.3. Promotion of Mistrust
  • 3.1.4. Mainstream Socialization
  • 3.2. Correlates of Ethnic Minority Parents' Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 3.2.1. Family-Level Predictors of Ethnic-Racial Socialization
  • 3.2.2. Links to Child Outcomes
  • 4. Ethnic Majority Parents' Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 4.1. Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 4.2. Correlates of Ethnic Majority Parents' Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices
  • 5. Gaps in the Literature and Future Directions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Social Exclusion Based on Group Membership is a Form of Prejudice
  • 1. Intergroup Social Exclusion as a Form of Prejudice
  • 1.1. Recognizing Intergroup Social Exclusion in Childhood
  • 1.1.1. Prevalence of Social Exclusion in Development
  • 1.2. Consequences of Intergroup Social Exclusion in Childhood
  • 1.3. Combating Exclusion Through Consideration of Fairness
  • 2. Social Reasoning Developmental Model for Understanding Intergroup Social Exclusion in Childhood
  • 2.1. Developmental Social Identity Theories
  • 2.2. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics
  • 2.3. Social Domain Theory
  • 3. Contributors to Inclusion and Exclusion Decisions: Role of Intergroup Contact and Friendships
  • 3.1. School Diversity
  • 3.2. Intergroup Friendships
  • 3.3. Inclusive Policies
  • 4. Contributors to Inclusion and Exclusion Decisions: Role of Peer Group Norms
  • 4.1. Adherence to Stereotypic Norms
  • 4.2. Distinguishing Group and Individual Perspectives
  • 4.3. Impact of Group Status
  • 4.4. Group Status and Social Inequalities
  • 5. Contributors to Inclusion and Exclusion Decisions: Role of Teachers and Parents
  • 5.1. Teachers
  • 5.2. Parents
  • 5.3. Weighing Adult and Peer Messages
  • 6. Intergroup Social Exclusion in Context: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Children´s Intergroup Relations and Attitudes
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Scope and Significance of the Problem
  • 1.2. Chapter Goals
  • 2. Historical Approaches and Overview of Our Model
  • 2.1. Historical Approaches to Intergroup Relations
  • 2.2. Overview of Our Model
  • 3. Core Processes in Intergroup Relations and Attitudes
  • 3.1. Intergroup Contact
  • 3.2. Intergroup Interaction
  • 3.3. Intergroup Friendship
  • 3.4. Intergroup Attitudes
  • 4. Factors That Shape Core Processes
  • 4.1. Factors Affecting Intergroup Contact
  • 4.1.1. Overview
  • 4.1.2. Societal Segregation
  • 4.1.3. Perceptions of Group Variability
  • 4.1.4. Status Seeking
  • 4.1.5. Valuing Diversity
  • 4.2. Developmental Changes in Intergroup Contact
  • 4.3. Factors Affecting Intergroup Interactions
  • 4.3.1. Overview
  • 4.3.2. Interaction Structure
  • 4.3.3. Environmental Belongingness Cues
  • 4.3.4. Group-Based Rejection Concerns
  • 4.4. Developmental Changes in Intergroup Interactions
  • 4.5. Factors Affecting Intergroup Friendship
  • 4.5.1. Overview
  • 4.5.1.1. Social Group Consciousness
  • 4.5.1.2. Motivation to Appear Nonprejudiced
  • 4.5.1.3. Intergroup Transactional Engagement
  • 4.5.1.4. Social Norms
  • 4.5.1.5. Fear of Transitive Property of Social Stigma
  • 4.6. Developmental Changes in Intergroup Friendships
  • 4.7. Factors Affecting Intergroup Attitudes
  • 4.7.1. Common Identity
  • 4.7.2. Affective Change
  • 4.8. Developmental Changes in Intergroup Attitudes
  • 4.9. Pathway Between Intergroup Attitudes and Intergroup Contact
  • 4.9.1. Self-Expansion
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Power, Process, and Protection: Juveniles as Defendants in the Justice System
  • 1. The US Juvenile Justice System in Context
  • 2. Realities of the Juvenile Justice System
  • 2.1. "System" Is a Collection of Independent Organizations
  • 2.2. Youth of Color and Girls Receive Disproportionate Contact and Confinement
  • 2.3. Many Youth Are Not Represented by Attorneys
  • 2.4. Attorneys Play a Critical Role in the Protection of Youth Rights
  • 3. Waiving the Constitutional Right to Trial
  • 3.1. Developmental Differences in the Capacities to Understand the Waiver Process
  • 4. Developmental Differences in the Capacities to Voluntarily Waive the Right to Trial
  • 4.1. Youth May Enter the Process Anticipating Unfairness
  • 4.2. Youth May Misinterpret Interaction Among System Officials
  • 4.3. Youth May Be Particularly Susceptible to Pressure from Prosecutors
  • 4.4. Youths May Have Difficulty Resisting Paternalistic Pressure from Defense Attorneys
  • 4.5. Judges Assessments of Voluntariness Are Not Developmentally Sensitive
  • 4.6. Parents May Not Always Act in Their Youth´s Best Interests
  • 5. Implications for Youths' Well-Being
  • 6. Recommendations
  • 7. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Social Justice and the Environmental Commons
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Conceptual Definitions and Framework
  • 3. Environmental Commons and Civic Life
  • 4. Environmental Commons and Child Rights
  • 5. Social Justice Implications of the Environmental Commons Framework
  • 5.1. Privatization of the Commons
  • 5.2. Inequities in Benefits and Burdens of Natural Resource Use
  • 5.3. Inequities in Power to Affect Decisions About the Commons
  • 5.4. Interdependence-Spaces, Species, and Generations
  • 5.5. Equity in Access to Green Spaces
  • 6. Moral Disengagement from Environmental Responsibility
  • 7. Challenging Injustice: Evidence from Youth and the Environmental Commons
  • 8. Preserving Our Environmental Commons
  • 8.1. Applying Ostrom´s Design Principles to Stewardship Education
  • 8.2. Place-Based Stewardship Education
  • 8.3. Identification with the Group and Its Task
  • 8.4. Mutual Respect, Responsibility, and Trust
  • 8.5. Relationships That Build Trust
  • 9. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Eight: Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States: The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research
  • 1. Current Policy Contexts
  • 2. Developmental Context
  • 3. Building Theory
  • 3.1. Developmental Theories
  • 3.2. Social Justice Perspective
  • 4. Ethical Design and Methods in Research on Unauthorized Status
  • 4.1. Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • 4.2. Sampling Participants
  • 4.3. Protecting Participants
  • 4.4. Measuring Unauthorized Status
  • 4.5. Community-Based Participatory Research
  • 4.6. Ending a Program of Research with Attention to Sustainability
  • 5. Dissemination and Use of Research Results
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter Nine: And I Shot Her: On War, and the Creation of Inequities in the Development of Youths' Moral Capacities
  • 1. On the Need for an Equity Agenda Targeting War-Affected Populations
  • 2. On War-Exposure, and the Alteration of the Ecology of Youth Development
  • 3. On War-Exposure, and the Primacy of PTSD and Emotional Distress
  • 4. On War-Exposure, and the Disruption of the Development of Moral Capacities
  • 4.1. Constructing Polarized and Imbalanced Views of Right and Wrong
  • 4.2. Essentializing Moral Agency
  • 4.3. Numbing Moral Agency
  • 4.4. Searching for, but Failing to Find, Meaning in War
  • 5. On War-Exposure, and the Intractability of Psychological Inequities: Concluding Thoughts
  • References
  • Chapter Ten: Global Equity and Justice Issues for Young People During the First Three Decades of Life
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Setting the Context
  • 2.1. Rights of Children
  • 2.2. Child Justice
  • 3. Global Challenges to Equity and Justice for Children and Youth
  • 3.1. Geographic Location
  • 3.2. Poverty
  • 3.3. Gender Inequality
  • 3.4. Additional Factors
  • 4. Global Opportunities for Equity and Justice for Children and Youth
  • 4.1. Youth Bulge
  • 4.2. Capitalizing on Globalization
  • 4.3. Positive Development Framing
  • 5. Effective Programs and Interventions
  • 5.1. Global Policy Initiatives
  • 5.1.1. Millennium Development Goals
  • 5.1.2. Global Sustainable Development Goals
  • 5.2. National and Topical Interventions
  • 5.3. Community-Engaged Interventions
  • 5.3.1. Early Childhood
  • 5.3.2. Disadvantaged Children and Youth
  • 5.3.3. Street Children
  • 5.3.4. University-Community Partnerships
  • 5.4. Strategic Interventions
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index
  • Contents of Previous Volumes
  • Back Cover

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