Law for Computer Scientists and Other Folk

 
 
Oxford University Press
  • erschienen am 22. April 2020
  • |
  • 335 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-19-260490-3 (ISBN)
 
This is the first textbook introducing law to computer scientists. The book covers privacy and data protection law, cybercrime, intellectual property, private law liability and legal personhood and legal agency, next to introductions to private law, public law, criminal law and international and supranational law. It provides an overview of the practical implications of law, their theoretical underpinnings and how they affect the study and construction of computational architectures. In a constitutional democracy everyone is under the Rule of Law, including those who develop code and systems, and those who put applications on the market. It is pivotal that computer scientists and developers get to know what law and the Rule of Law require. Before talking about ethics, we need to make sure that the checks and balances of law and the Rule of Law are in place and complied with. Though it is focused on European law, it also refers to US law and aims to provide insights into what makes law, law, rather than brute force or morality, demonstrating the operations of law in a way that has global relevance. This book is geared to those who have no wish to become lawyers but are nevertheless forced to consider the salience of legal rights and obligations with regard to the construction, maintenance and protection of computational artefacts. This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
978-0-19-260490-3 (9780192604903)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Half title
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgements
  • Reading Guide
  • Glossary
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Abbreviations
  • 1. Introduction: Textbook and Essay
  • 1.1 Middle Ground: Architecture
  • 1.2 Law in 'Speakerspace'
  • 1.3 Law in 'Manuscriptspace'
  • 1.4 Law in 'Bookspace'
  • 1.5 Law in Cyberspace: A New 'Onlife World'
  • 1.6 Outline
  • 1.6.1 What law does
  • 1.6.2 Domains of cyberlaw
  • 1.6.3 Frontiers of law in an onlife world
  • 1.6.4 Finals
  • Part 1 What Law Does
  • 2. Law, Democracy, and the Rule of?Law
  • 2.1 What is Law?
  • 2.1.1 Sources of?law
  • 2.1.2 What law does
  • 2.1.2.1 Legal effect
  • 2.1.2.2 Effective and practical individual rights
  • 2.1.3 Legal reasoning
  • 2.2 What is Law in a Constitutional Democracy?
  • 2.2.1 Law, morality, and politics, and the nature of legal rules
  • 2.2.2 Legal certainty, justice, instrumentality
  • 3. Domains of Law: Private, Public, and Criminal?Law
  • 3.1 Private, Public, and Criminal Law: Conceptual Distinctions
  • 3.1.1 Absolute rights and relative rights
  • 3.1.2 Private law and public?law
  • 3.1.3 Private law and criminal?law
  • 3.2 Private?Law
  • 3.2.1 Property law: transfer of movables
  • 3.2.2 Contract law and property law: sale and transfer of real estate
  • 3.2.3 Tort liability
  • 3.3 Public Law and Criminal?Law
  • 3.3.1 Public?law
  • 3.3.1.1 Constitutional?law
  • 3.3.1.2 Administrative?law
  • 3.3.2 Criminal?law
  • 3.3.2.1 Substantive criminal?law
  • 3.3.2.2 Criminal procedure, including police investigation
  • 4. International and Supranational?Law
  • 4.1 Jurisdiction in Western Legal Systems
  • 4.1.1 An example
  • 4.1.2 National jurisdiction
  • 4.2 International?Law
  • 4.2.1 Sources of international?law
  • 4.2.2 Monism and dualism in international?law
  • 4.3 Supranational?Law
  • 4.3.1 Transfer of sovereignty
  • 4.3.2 Sources of EU?law
  • 4.3.3 Case law of the CJEU
  • 4.4 International Rule of?Law
  • Part 2 Domains of Cyberlaw
  • 5. Privacy and Data Protection
  • 5.1 Human Rights?Law
  • 5.1.1 Human rights as defence rights against the modern state
  • 5.1.2 From liberty rights to social, economic, and further rights
  • 5.2 The Concept of Privacy
  • 5.2.1 Taxonomies and family resemblance
  • 5.2.2 Privacy and technology
  • 5.3 The Right to Privacy
  • 5.3.1 The right to privacy: constitutional?law
  • 5.3.2 The right to privacy: international?law
  • 5.3.3 The right to privacy: supranational?law
  • 5.3.4 Article 8 ECHR
  • 5.3.5 Case law Article 8 ECHR regarding surveillance
  • 5.3.5.1 Post-?crime surveillance
  • 5.3.5.2 Pre-?crime surveillance (including surveillance by the intelligence services)
  • 5.4 Privacy and Data Protection
  • 5.4.1 Defaults: an opacity right and a transparency right
  • 5.4.2 Distinctive but overlapping rights: a Venn diagram
  • 5.4.3 Legal remedies in case of violation
  • 5.5 Data Protection?Law
  • 5.5.1 EU and US data protection?law
  • 5.5.2 EU data protection?law
  • 5.5.2.1 Sources of law regarding EU data protection?law
  • 5.5.2.2 Material and territorial scope
  • 5.5.2.3 Personal data and data subject
  • 5.5.2.4 Data controller and data processor
  • 5.5.2.5 Legal ground for lawful processing of personal data
  • 5.5.2.6 Principles of lawful, fair, and transparent processing
  • 5.5.2.7 Valid consent
  • 5.5.2.8 Special categories of data
  • 5.5.2.9 Data protection by design and default (DPbDD)
  • 5.5.2.10 Data protection impact assessment
  • 5.5.2.11 Compliance and enforcement
  • 5.6 Privacy and Data Protection Revisited
  • 6. Cybercrime
  • 6.1 The Problem of Cybercrime
  • 6.1.1 Computer crime
  • 6.1.2 Cybercrime
  • 6.2 Cybercrime and Public?Law
  • 6.2.1 The Cybercrime Convention
  • 6.2.1.1 Substantive?law
  • 6.2.1.2 Procedural?law
  • 6.2.1.3 Extraterritorial jurisdiction to enforce or investigate
  • 6.2.2 Limitations on investigative powers
  • 6.2.2.1 Proportionality test for police access to personal data
  • 6.2.2.2 Proportionality test, balancing tests, and the image of the scale
  • 6.3 The EU Cybercrime and Cybersecurity Directives
  • 7. Copyright in Cyberspace
  • 7.1 IP Law as Private?Law
  • 7.2 Overview of IP Rights
  • 7.2.1 Copyright
  • 7.2.2 Patents
  • 7.2.3 Trademark
  • 7.3 History, Objectives, and Scope of Copyright Protection
  • 7.4 EU Copyright?Law
  • 7.4.1 The Copyright Directive and the Enforcement Directive
  • 7.4.1.1 The scope of protection (restrictions) and the limitations
  • 7.4.1.2 The home copy case of the CJEU
  • 7.4.1.3 IP enforcement against intermediaries
  • 7.4.1.4 Injunctions to cease unlawful sharing: Sabam v. Netlog
  • 7.4.1.5 Injunctions to cease unlawful sharing: Brein v. Ziggo
  • 7.4.1.6 The update of the Copyright Directive
  • 7.4.2 The Software Copyright Directive
  • 7.4.2.1 Exceptions to the exclusionary software copyright: SAS v. WLP
  • 7.4.2.2 Exceptions to the exclusionary software copyright: Microsoft
  • 7.5 Open Source and Free Access
  • 8. Private Law Liability for Faulty?ICT
  • 8.1 Back to Basics
  • 8.1.1 Chapter 3: private law distinctions
  • 8.1.2 Chapter 4: international and supranational?law
  • 8.1.3 Chapter 5: data protection?law
  • 8.2 Tort Law in Europe
  • 8.3 Third-?Party Liability for Unlawful Processing and Other Cyber Torts
  • 8.3.1 Privacy harms
  • 8.3.1.1 Canadian 'tort of intrusion upon seclusion'
  • 8.3.1.2 UK 'tort of misuse of private information'
  • 8.3.2 Cyber torts?
  • Part 3 Frontiers of Law in an Onlife World
  • 9. Legal Personhood for?AI?
  • 9.1 Legal Subjectivity
  • 9.2 Legal Agency
  • 9.3 Artificial Agents
  • 9.4 Private Law Liability
  • 10. 'Legal by Design' or 'Legal Protection by Design'?
  • 10.1 Machine Learning (ML)
  • 10.1.1 Exploratory and confirmatory ML research design
  • 10.1.2 Implications of micro-?targeting
  • 10.1.3 Implications of micro-?targeting for the rule of?law
  • 10.2 Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLTs), Smart Contracts, and Smart Regulation
  • 10.2.1 Smart contracts and smart regulation
  • 10.2.2 The legal status of 'smart contracts' under private?law
  • 10.2.3 The legal status of 'smart regulation' under public?law
  • 10.3 'Legal by Design' or 'Legal Protection by Design'?
  • 10.3.1 Legal by design (LbD)
  • 10.3.2 Legal protection by design (LPbD)
  • 10.3.3 LPbD in the GDPR
  • 10.3.3.1 Data protection impact assessment
  • 10.3.3.2 Data protection by default and by design (DPbDD)
  • 10.3.3.3 Automated decisions
  • Part 4 Finals
  • 11. Closure: On Ethics, Code, and?Law
  • 11.1 Distinctions between Law, Code, and Ethics
  • 11.1.1 Utilitarianism and methodological individualism
  • 11.1.2 Deontological reasoning: respect for human autonomy
  • 11.1.3 Virtue ethics: perceiving the good and doing what is right
  • 11.1.4 Pragmatist ethics: taking into account
  • 11.1.5 The difference that makes a difference: closure
  • 11.2 The Conceptual Relationship between Law, Code, and Ethics
  • 11.2.1 Justice, legal certainty, and instrumentality
  • 11.2.2 Law, code, and the rule of?law
  • 11.3 The Interaction between Law, Code, and Ethics
  • 11.3.1 'By design' approaches in law and ethics
  • 11.3.2 Fairness by design and 'fair computing' paradigms
  • 11.3.2.1 The case of COMPAS
  • 11.3.2.2 A computational 'fairness by design' approach to detain/?release court decisions
  • 11.3.2.3 An ethical 'fairness by design' approach to detain/?release court decisions
  • 11.3.2.4 A legal 'fairness by design' approach to detain/?release court decisions
  • 11.4 Closure: The Force of Technology and the Force of?Law

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