Handbook of the Economics of Education

 
 
North Holland (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 27. April 2016
  • |
  • 782 Seiten
 
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978-0-444-63467-2 (ISBN)
 

This volume contains original contributions about research that has appeared at top research seminars and received grant funding in recent years. Contributors explore technical details that illuminate major methodological and theoretical insights. A resource for students and researchers interested in the economics of education and human capital more generally, this volume presents in-depth treatments that are too focused for other publications


  • Demonstrates how new methodologies are yielding fresh perspectives in education economics
  • Uses rich data to study issues of high contemporary policy relevance
  • Explores innovations in higher education, competition, and the uses of technology
  • Englisch
  • Amsterdam
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  • Niederlande
Elsevier Science
  • 12,38 MB
978-0-444-63467-2 (9780444634672)
0444634673 (0444634673)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Handbook of the Economics of Education
  • Copyright
  • Introduction to the series
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Editors' Introduction
  • References
  • Chapter 1: Behavioral Economics of Education: Progress and Possibilities
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Barriers to Treating Education as Investment
  • 2.1. Some Students Focus Too Much on the Present
  • 2.2. Some Students Rely Too Much on Routine
  • 2.3. Some Students Focus Too Much on Negative Identities
  • 2.4. Mistakes Are More Likely With Too Little Information or Too Many Options
  • 3. Opportunities for Improvement
  • 3.1. Parental Involvement
  • 3.2. Attendance
  • 3.3. Homework
  • 3.4. High School Completion
  • 3.5. College Attainment
  • 3.6. Program Suitability
  • 3.7. College Aid Savvy
  • 3.8. College Cost Savvy
  • 4. Policies and Programs to Address Behavioral Barriers
  • 4.1. Interventions That Aim to Offset Immediate Costs With Immediate Benefits
  • 4.2. Interventions That Help Reduce Inertia and Change Routine
  • 4.2.1. Text Messages, Email Reminders, Mailings, and Videos
  • 4.2.2. Personal Assistance
  • 4.2.3. Coaching and Advising
  • 4.2.4. Helping Parents
  • 4.2.5. Changing Defaults and Adding Structure
  • 4.3. Interventions That Strengthen Positive Identities
  • 4.4. Interventions That Simplify Options and Combat the Paradox of Choice
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Education Research and Administrative Data
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Benefits of Using Administrative Data in Education Research
  • 3. Case Studies
  • 3.1. Norway
  • 3.2. Sweden
  • 3.3. Florida
  • 4. Challenges Associated With the Use of Administrative Data
  • 4.1. Limited Information/Less Flexibility Than With Purpose-Built Surveys
  • 4.2. Technical Issues With the Use of Administrative Registers
  • 4.3. Political Issues Related to Anonymity
  • 5. The Use of Administrative Data Around the World
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Charter Schools: A Survey of Research on Their Characteristics and Effectiveness
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. What Is a Charter School?
  • 3. Location and Clientele
  • 3.1. Where Do Charter Schools Locate?
  • 3.1.1. Variation Across States
  • 3.1.2. Variation Across City, Suburban, and Rural Districts
  • 3.2. Student Selection: Who Do Charter Schools Serve?
  • 3.2.1. National, State, Metropolitan, and District Comparisons
  • 3.2.2. Within-School Diversity of Charters Relative to Public Schools
  • 3.3. Teachers in Charter Schools
  • 3.4. Evaluating Charter Schools: Methodological Issues
  • 4. Effectiveness of Charter Schools
  • 4.1. Achievement Effects
  • 4.2. Effects on Other Outcomes
  • 5. Inside the Black Box
  • 5.1. Charter School Teachers
  • 5.2. Nonteacher Differences
  • 6. Competitive Effects
  • 6.1. Financial Impacts
  • 6.2. Challenges in Estimating Competitive Impacts on Effectiveness of TPSs
  • 6.3. Competitive Impacts of Charters on TPS Effectiveness
  • 7. Summary and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Competition Among Schools: Traditional Public and Private Schools
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. A Simple Framework
  • 2.1. Question 1: Do Children Experience Higher Achievement Gains in Private Than in Public Schools?
  • 2.2. Question 2: If Private Schools Raise Achievement More, Is This Because These Schools Are More Productive?
  • 2.3. Question 3: Does Competition From Private Schools Raise Public School Productivity? Does the Existence of Private Sc...
  • 3. The Evidence
  • 3.1. Question 1: Do Children Experience Higher Achievement Gains in Private Than in Public Schools?
  • 3.1.1. United States
  • 3.1.2. Colombia
  • 3.1.3. India
  • 3.2. Question 2: If Private Schools Raise Achievement More, Is This Because These Schools Are More Productive?
  • 3.3. Question 3: Does Competition From Private Schools Raise Public School Productivity? Does the Existence of Private Sc...
  • 3.3.1. Chile
  • 3.3.2. Sweden
  • 3.4. Evidence From Small-Scale Programs Related to Question 3: Canada, India, and the USA
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Technology Use in Schools
  • 2.1. Estimates of Rates of Technology Use in Schools
  • 2.2. Theoretical Issues
  • 2.3. Empirical Findings
  • 2.3.1. Information and Communication Technologies Investment
  • 2.3.2. Computer-Assisted Instruction
  • 2.3.3. Computer Skills
  • 2.3.4. Online College Courses
  • Summary
  • 3. Technology Use at Home by Students
  • 3.1. Estimates of Rates of Technology Use at Home by Students
  • 3.2. Theoretical Issues
  • 3.3. Empirical Findings
  • 3.3.1. Effects of Home Computers and the Internet on Educational Outcomes
  • 3.3.2. Heterogeneity in Home Computer Effects
  • 3.3.3. Effects on Computer Skills and Other Outcomes
  • Summary
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Teacher Pensions
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Background on Retirement Benefit Plans for Educators
  • 2.1. How Traditional, Final-Average-Salary DB Pension Plans Work
  • 2.2. Pension-Wealth Accrual in Traditional DB Plans
  • 2.3. Defined-Contribution, Hybrid, Cash-Balance, and Choice Plans
  • 3. Incentives for Educators
  • 4. Pension Plan Financing
  • 5. The Changing US Pension Landscape
  • 6. Teacher Pensions in Other OECD Countries
  • 7. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: The Analysis of Field Choice in College and Graduate School: Determinants and Wage Effects
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Descriptives
  • 2.1. Undergraduate Degrees
  • 2.2. Graduate Degrees
  • 2.3. The Distribution of Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees
  • 2.3.1. Facts About Earnings
  • Math Test Scores, Course Content, and Earnings Differential Across Fields
  • Occupation Choice and Earnings Differentials Across Fields
  • 3. Model
  • 3.1. A Simple Model of Dynamic Major Choice
  • 3.2. Heterogeneity in Schooling Options
  • 3.2.1. Expanding the Choice Set
  • 3.3. Heterogeneity in Occupations
  • 3.3.1. Accounting for Search Frictions
  • 3.3.2. The Effect of Labor Market Conditions
  • 3.4. Evolution of Beliefs
  • 3.5. Supply Side
  • 4. Estimating the Return to College Majors
  • 4.1. Sources of Bias in Estimating the Return to College Majors
  • 4.2. Multiple Regression with Controls for Ability
  • 4.2.1. OLS Evidence on Heterogeneity in the Returns
  • 4.2.2. Estimation Using Selection on Observables as a Guide to Selection on Unobservables
  • 4.3. Control Function Approaches to Controlling for Selection on Unobservables
  • 4.4. Structural Modeling of Major Choice and Wages
  • 4.5. Using Variation in Access to Fields of Study to Identify Returns
  • 4.5.1. Methods
  • 4.5.2. Discontinuities in Practice
  • 4.5.3. Results Using the Fuzzy RD Approach
  • 4.6. Returns to Graduate Degrees
  • 5. Choice of Major
  • 5.1. Demand Side
  • 5.1.1. The Role of Expected Earnings
  • 5.1.2. Ability Sorting and Learning
  • Should Higher Education Systems Require Students to Specialize Early?
  • 5.1.3. Other Determinants
  • Gender-Specific Preferences
  • Parental Influence
  • Risk Aversion
  • 5.2. Supply Side
  • 5.3. Subjective Expectations
  • 5.4. Graduate School
  • 5.4.1. Demand for Graduate School and the Business Cycle
  • 5.4.2. Demand for MBAs
  • 5.4.3. Demand for Medical School Specialties
  • 6. Conclusion
  • Appendix A: Distribution of Male and Female College Graduates by Field
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Student Loans and Repayment: Theory, Evidence, and Policy
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Trends
  • 2.1. Three Important Economic Trends
  • 2.2. US Trends in Student Borrowing and Debt
  • 2.3. US Trends in Student Loan Delinquency and Default
  • 2.4. Summary of Major Trends
  • 3. Current Student Loan Environment
  • 3.1. Federal Student Loan Programs in the USA
  • 3.1.1. Stafford Loans
  • 3.1.2. PLUS and GradPLUS Loans
  • 3.1.3. Perkins Loans
  • 3.1.4. Federal Student Loan Repayment and Default
  • 3.2. Private Student Loan Programs in the USA
  • 3.3. The International Experience
  • 3.4. Comparing Income-Contingent Repayment Amounts
  • 4. Can College Students Borrow Enough?
  • 5. Do Some Students Borrow Too Much?
  • 5.1. Student Loan Repayment/Nonpayment 10 Years After Graduation
  • 5.2. Default and Nonpayment at For-Profit Institutions
  • 5.3. The Roles of Income, Savings, and Family Support
  • 6. Designing the Optimal Credit Program
  • 6.1. Basic Environment
  • 6.2. Unrestricted Allocations (First Best)
  • 6.3. Limited Commitment
  • 6.3.1. Complete Contracts With Limited Enforcement
  • 6.3.2. Incomplete Contracts With Limited Enforcement
  • 6.4. Costly State Verification
  • 6.5. Moral Hazard
  • 6.6. Multiple Incentive Problems
  • 6.6.1. Costly State Verification and Moral Hazard
  • 6.6.2. Limited Commitment: Default or Additional Constraints?
  • 6.7. Extensions With Multiple Labor Market Periods
  • 6.8. Related Literature
  • 7. Key Principles and Policy Guidance
  • 7.1. Three Key Principles in the Design of Student Loan Programs
  • 7.2. The Optimal Structure of Loan Repayments
  • 7.3. Reducing the Costs of Income Verification
  • 7.4. Enforcing Repayment and the Potential for Default
  • 7.5. Setting Borrowing Limits
  • 7.6. Other Considerations
  • 8. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Government-Sponsored Vocational Education for Adults
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Theory: Provision
  • 2.1. General Framework
  • 2.2. A Dynamic Model of Human Capital Investment
  • 2.3. Human Capital Specificity
  • 2.4. Market Imperfections and Job Training
  • 2.5. Job Search and Publicly Provided Training
  • 2.6. Multiple Training Options
  • 2.7. General Equilibrium Effects
  • 3. Theory: Participation in Training Programs
  • 4. Methods for Evaluating Vocational Training Programs
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Selection Into Participation
  • 4.3. Defining the Treatment
  • 4.4. Outcomes
  • 4.5. Comparison Group Selection
  • 4.6. Timing and Dynamic Treatment Effect Issues
  • 4.7. Subgroups and Multiple Comparisons
  • 4.8. Methods: Field Experiments
  • 4.9. Methods: Selection on Observed Variables
  • 4.10. Methods: Difference-in-Differences and Related Longitudinal Methods
  • 4.11. Methods: Instrumental Variables
  • 4.12. Methods: Regression Discontinuity
  • 4.13. Methods: Partial Equilibrium Structural Models
  • 4.14. General Equilibrium
  • 4.15. Policy Evaluation and Evaluation Policy
  • 5. United States
  • 5.1. Types of Programs
  • 5.1.1. Omnibus Programs
  • 5.1.2. Large Specialized Programs: Job Corps and Trade Adjustment Assistance
  • 5.2. Evidence of Impacts
  • 5.2.1. Early Evaluations
  • 5.2.2. JTPA
  • 5.2.3. WIA
  • 5.2.4. Job Corps
  • 5.2.5. TAA
  • 5.2.6. Evaluations of Other Training Programs
  • 5.3. Overview and Conclusions
  • 6. United Kingdom
  • 6.1. Types of Programs
  • 6.1.1. Education System
  • 6.1.2. Apprenticeships and Traineeships
  • 6.1.3. Further Education: Math and English
  • 6.1.4. Community Learning Programs
  • 6.1.5. Training Programs for Individuals Receiving Assistance
  • NDYP
  • ND25+
  • ND50+
  • NDLP
  • NDC
  • Current Programs
  • 6.2. Evidence of Impacts
  • 7. Germany
  • 7.1. Types of Programs
  • 7.1.1. Basic Education for Adults
  • 7.1.2. Further Vocational Training and Related Programs for Jobseekers
  • 7.1.3. Further Vocational Training for Employed Workers
  • 7.1.4. Retraining
  • 7.1.5. Training for Career Advancement
  • 7.2. Assignment to and Use of Training Administered by the PES
  • 7.3. Evidence on Impacts
  • 7.3.1. Programs for Unemployed Workers
  • 7.3.2. Programs for Employed Workers
  • 7.3.3. Combined German Language and Vocational Training Courses for Immigrants
  • 7.3.4. Summary
  • 8. France
  • 8.1. Types of Programs
  • 8.1.1. Basic Education for Adults
  • 8.1.2. Formal Vocational Qualification for Adults
  • 8.1.3. Vocational Training Administered by the PES
  • 8.2. Evidence on Impacts
  • 9. Sweden
  • 9.1. Types of Programs
  • 9.1.1. Basic Education for Adults
  • 9.1.2. Further Vocational Training and Related Programs Administered by the PES
  • 9.1.3. Further Vocational Training Administered by Other Institutions
  • 9.2. Evidence on Impacts
  • 9.2.1. Basic Education for Adults
  • 9.2.2. Further Vocational Training and Related Programs Administered by the PES
  • 9.2.3. Special Programs for Immigrants
  • 9.2.4. Summary
  • 10. Denmark
  • 10.1. Types of Programs
  • 10.1.1. General Education for Adults
  • 10.1.2. Vocational Training for Adults
  • 10.1.3. Special Programs Administered by the PES
  • 10.2. Evidence on Impacts
  • 11. Matching Participants to Training
  • 11.1. Does Match Matter?
  • 11.2. Assignment by Caseworkers
  • 11.2.1. Direct Evidence on the Role of Caseworkers
  • 11.2.2. The Role of Organizational Features
  • 11.2.3. Statistical Tools to Assist Caseworkers in Their Decision
  • 11.2.4. Optimal Assignment to Training
  • 11.3. Demand-Based Systems
  • 12. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Improving Education Outcomes in Developing Countries: Evidence, Knowledge Gaps, and Policy Implications
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Trends in Education Outcomes, 1990 to 2014
  • 3. Conceptual Issues
  • 3.1. Theoretical Framework
  • 3.2. Empirics
  • 3.2.1. Step 1: Search for Possibly Relevant Papers/Reports and Read Their Abstracts
  • 3.2.2. Step 2: Read Entire Paper/Report to Verify Relevance
  • 3.2.3. Step 3: Retaining Only High-Quality Evaluations
  • 3.2.4. Step 4: Identify RCT Evaluations
  • 4. Review of the Evidence
  • 4.1. Demand-Side Interventions (Interventions That Focus on Households)
  • 4.1.1. Information-Based Interventions
  • 4.1.2. Cash Transfer Programs
  • 4.1.3. Scholarship Programs
  • 4.1.4. Other Household Interventions That Increase the Demand for Schooling
  • 4.2. Inputs
  • 4.2.1. Access to Schools
  • 4.2.2. Pedagogical Materials and Facilities
  • 4.2.3. Teacher Quantity and Quality
  • 4.2.4. Provision of Food
  • 4.2.5. Provision of Medical Services
  • 4.2.6. Large-Scale Provision of Resources
  • 4.3. Pedagogy
  • 4.3.1. Supplemental Remedial Instruction and Teaching at the Right Level
  • 4.3.2. Tracking of Classrooms
  • 4.3.3. Technology-Enhanced Instruction
  • 4.3.4. Reading Intensive Pedagogy and Reading Materials
  • 4.4. Governance
  • 4.4.1. Measuring Governance
  • 4.4.2. Monitoring
  • 4.4.3. School-Based Management
  • 4.4.4. Teacher Performance Pay
  • 4.4.5. Teacher Contractual Structure
  • 4.4.6. Private Schools, Vouchers, and Public-Private Partnerships
  • 4.4.7. Single-Sex Schools
  • 5. Interpreting the Evidence, and Implications for Future Research
  • 5.1. Challenges in Interpreting the Evidence
  • 5.1.1. Production Function Parameters Versus Policy Parameters
  • 5.1.2. External Validity
  • 5.1.3. Comparability of Interventions
  • 5.2. Mapping the Evidence to a Deeper Understanding of Developing Country Education
  • 5.2.1. Understanding Nonimpact
  • 5.2.2. Drawing the Right Lessons From "Effective" Interventions
  • 5.3. Cost-Effectiveness and Making Individual Studies More Comparable
  • 6. Conclusion
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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