Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics in Obesity

 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 23. November 2017
  • |
  • 392 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-85797-7 (ISBN)
 


About the Editor
Catherine Hankey, PhD RD
is Senior Lecturer in Human Nutrition at the School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

About the Series Editor
Kevin Whelan, PhD RD FBDA
is Professor of Dietetics in the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.

  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für höhere Schule und Studium
  • |
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 7,13 MB
978-1-118-85797-7 (9781118857977)
1118857976 (1118857976)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Foreword
  • Editor biographies
  • Contributors
  • Abbreviations
  • Section 1 Introduction
  • Chapter 1.1 Definition, prevalence and historical perspectives of obesity in adults
  • 1.1.1 Definitions of overweight and obesity
  • 1.1.2 Prevalence and trends for obesity in adults
  • 1.1.3 Recent history of obesity in adults
  • 1.1.4 Genetics of obesity
  • 1.1.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 1.2 Definition, prevalence and historical perspectives of obesity in children
  • 1.2.1 Definition of obesity in children
  • 1.2.2 Trends in the prevalence of childhood obesity
  • 1.2.3 Conclusion
  • 1.2.4 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 1.3 Development of overweight and obesity across the life course
  • 1.3.1 Childhood: birth to early school age
  • 1.3.2 Adolescence and young adulthood
  • 1.3.3 Marriage or cohabitation and body weight
  • 1.3.4 Pregnancy
  • 1.3.5 Retirement and aging
  • 1.3.6 Conclusion
  • 1.3.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 1.4 Diagnostic criteria and assessment of obesity in adults
  • 1.4.1 Indicators of rising body fat content
  • 1.4.2 Weight and body mass index (BMI)
  • 1.4.3 Waist circumference
  • 1.4.4 Diagnosis of obesity by genetic markers
  • 1.4.5 Obesity diagnosis with clinical staging
  • 1.4.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 1.5 Diagnostic criteria and assessment of obesity in children
  • 1.5.1 Introduction
  • 1.5.2 Diagnosis of overweight and obesity in children and young people
  • 1.5.3 Assessment
  • 1.5.4 Treatment success criteria
  • 1.5.5 Conclusion
  • 1.5.6 Summary box
  • 1.5.7 Useful tools and websites
  • References
  • Section 2 Consequences and comorbidities associated with obesity
  • Chapter 2.1 Obesity in the development of type 2 diabetes
  • 2.1.1 Introduction
  • 2.1.2 Diabetes and obesity, the epidemiological relationship
  • 2.1.3 Epidemiological evidence for both obesity and reduced physical activity
  • 2.1.4 Pathophysiological processes linking obesity and type 2 diabetes
  • 2.1.5 Influence of ethnicity on obesity and risk of type 2 diabetes
  • 2.1.6 Diabetes - the impact of the disease
  • 2.1.7 Conclusions
  • 2.1.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 2.2 Obesity in the development of cardiovascular disease
  • 2.2.1 Relationship between BMI and cardiovascular mortality
  • 2.2.2 Causes of increased cardiovascular mortality
  • 2.2.3 Changes in cardiovascular risk associated with obesity
  • 2.2.4 Obesity and cardiovascular risk factors
  • 2.2.5 Pathophysiological processes linking obesity and cardiovascular disease
  • 2.2.6 Research requirements
  • 2.2.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 2.3 Obesity as a risk factor in the development of cancer
  • 2.3.1 Introduction
  • 2.3.2 Obesity and the development of cancer: the epidemiological evidence
  • 2.3.3 Pathophysiological processes linking obesity and cancer
  • 2.3.4 Weight loss and cancer risk reduction
  • 2.3.5 Development of weight loss regimens for cancer risk reduction
  • 2.3.6 Recommendations for cancer risk reduction and cancer survivorship
  • 2.3.7 Conclusion
  • 2.3.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 2.4 Obesity as a risk factor in osteoarthritis and pulmonary disease
  • 2.4.1 Osteoarthritis - disease pathogenesis and consequences
  • 2.4.2 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • 2.4.3 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 2.5 Psychology and mental health issues in obesity
  • 2.5.1 Attitudes towards shape and weight vary with time and place
  • 2.5.2 Mental health issues and obesity
  • 2.5.3 Addressing the mixed messages
  • 2.5.4 Conclusion
  • 2.5.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 2.6 Binge eating and obesity
  • 2.6.1 Binge eating and obesity
  • 2.6.2 Characteristics of binge eating in obese individuals
  • 2.6.3 Factors to consider in the development and treatment of binge eating and obesity
  • 2.6.4 Summary box
  • References
  • Section 3 Aetiology of obesity in adults
  • 3.1 Genetics and epigenetics in the aetiology of obesity
  • 3.1.1 Introduction
  • 3.1.2 Monogenic forms of obesity
  • 3.1.3 Syndromic obesity
  • 3.1.4 Copy number variations
  • 3.1.5 Polygenic / multifactorial or common obesity
  • 3.1.6 Epigenetic modifications and obesity
  • 3.1.7 Genetic factors affecting response to weight loss interventions
  • 3.1.8 Genetic testing in obesity
  • 3.1.9 Perspectives
  • 3.1.10 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.2 Food intake and appetite in the aetiology of obesity
  • 3.2.1 Introduction
  • 3.2.2 Food intake: biology or culture?
  • 3.2.3 Food intake, obesity and energy balance
  • 3.2.4 The 'satiety cascade' - episodic control of food intake
  • 3.2.5 Conclusions
  • 3.2.6 Acknowledgements
  • 3.2.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.3 Physiological control of appetite and food intake
  • 3.3.1 Introduction
  • 3.3.2 Central homeostatic regulation
  • 3.3.3 Peripheral homeostatic regulation of energy intake
  • 3.3.4 Conclusion
  • 3.3.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.4 Obesogenic medication in the aetiology of obesity
  • 3.4.1 Introduction
  • 3.4.2 Drugs associated with weight gain
  • 3.4.3 Discussion
  • 3.4.4 Conclusion
  • 3.4.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.5 Gut microbiome in obesity
  • 3.5.1 The gut microbiome
  • 3.5.2 Microbiome, obesity and weight loss
  • 3.5.3 Metabolic mechanisms of the microbiome in obesity
  • 3.5.4 Modifying the microbiome in the management of obesity
  • 3.5.5 Conclusion
  • 3.5.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.6 Physical activity and physical inactivity in the aetiology of obesity
  • 3.6.1 Introduction
  • 3.6.2 Physical activity and body weight: does physical inactivity lead to weight gain?
  • 3.6.3 Physical fitness and body weight: does being unfit lead to weight gain?
  • 3.6.4 Sedentary behaviour and body weight: does being sedentary lead to weight gain?
  • 3.6.5 Current physical activity guidelines and their relationship to weight change
  • 3.6.6 Summary
  • 3.6.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 3.7 Obesogenic environment and obesogenic behaviours
  • 3.7.1 Introduction
  • 3.7.2 Environmental correlates of obesity
  • 3.7.3 Conclusion
  • 3.7.4 Summary box
  • 3.7.5 List of useful websites
  • References
  • Section 4 Weight management in adults
  • Chapter 4.1 Macronutrient composition for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.1.1 Carbohydrates and weight loss
  • 4.1.2 Fat intake and weight loss
  • 4.1.3 Proteins and weight loss
  • 4.1.4 Summary and conclusion
  • 4.1.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.2 Meal replacements for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.2.1 Introduction
  • 4.2.2 Weight loss with meal-replacement plans
  • 4.2.3 Weight maintenance with meal-replacement plans
  • 4.2.4 Risks of meal-replacement plans
  • 4.2.5 Use of meal replacements for weight loss in special populations
  • 4.2.6 Conclusion
  • 4.2.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.3 Formula diets for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.3.1 Introduction
  • 4.3.2 Mechanism of action of formula diets
  • 4.3.3 Weight regain and lean body mass loss
  • 4.3.4 Potential applications
  • 4.3.5 Conclusion
  • 4.3.6 Conflict of interest
  • 4.3.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.4 Group-based interventions for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.4.1 Introduction
  • 4.4.2 Defining group-based interventions for weight management
  • 4.4.3 Evidence for obesity interventions delivered in a group setting
  • 4.4.4 Evidence for CWM Oprogrammes delivered in a group setting
  • 4.4.5 Gender in relation to weight loss groups
  • 4.4.6 Important components of group-based approaches in obesity management
  • 4.4.7 Conclusion
  • 4.4.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.5 Commercial weight management organisations for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.5.1 Evidence for effectiveness of CWMOs
  • 4.5.2 Conclusion
  • 4.5.3 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.6 Fad diets and fasting for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.6.1 Introduction
  • 4.6.2 Popularity of fad diets
  • 4.6.3 Classification of fad diets
  • 4.6.4 Mechanism of action
  • 4.6.5 Advantages of fad diets
  • 4.6.6 Disadvantages of fad diets
  • 4.6.7 Conclusion
  • 4.6.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.7 Pharmacological management of weight loss in obesity
  • 4.7.1 Orlistat
  • 4.7.2 Lorcaserin
  • 4.7.3 Phentermine/topiramate extended release
  • 4.7.4 Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists
  • 4.7.5 Naltrexone/bupropion
  • 4.7.6 Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological interventions in obesity
  • 4.7.7 Conclusion
  • 4.7.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.8 Diet to support pharmacological management of weight loss
  • 4.8.1 Anti-obesity drugs
  • 4.8.2 Diet to support anti-obesitydrugs
  • 4.8.3 Conclusion
  • 4.8.4 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.9 Surgical management of weight loss in obesity
  • 4.9.1 Introduction
  • 4.9.2 Patient selection, assessment and preparation
  • 4.9.3 Surgical and endoscopic procedures
  • 4.9.4 Risks and benefits of surgical procedures
  • 4.9.5 Selection of weight loss procedure
  • 4.9.6 Novel procedures
  • 4.9.7 Long-term management
  • 4.9.8 Challenges and future developments
  • 4.9.9 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.10 Diet to support surgical management of weight loss
  • 4.10.1 Introduction
  • 4.10.2 Preoperative assessment and preparation for surgery
  • 4.10.3 Postoperative dietary intervention
  • 4.10.4 Impact of bariatric surgery on nutrition
  • 4.10.5 Conclusion
  • 4.10.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.11 Physical activity for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.11.1 Introduction
  • 4.11.2 Physical activity and weight gain
  • 4.11.3 The impact of physical activity on energy balance
  • 4.11.4 Individual variability: biological and behavioural compensatory responses
  • 4.11.5 The effect of physical activity on energy intake
  • 4.11.6 Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis
  • 4.11.7 Beyond weight loss :alternative health benefits of physical activity
  • 4.11.8 The optimal dose of physical activity for weight loss and maintenance
  • 4.11.9 Conclusions
  • 4.11.10 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.12 Psychological interventions for weight loss in obesity
  • 4.12.1 Introduction
  • 4.12.2 Final considerations
  • 4.12.3 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.13 Weight loss interventions in specific groups: overweight and obese men
  • 4.13.1 Epidemiology of obesity in men
  • 4.13.2 Men's attitudes to lifestyle behaviour change
  • 4.13.3 Identifying obesity in men
  • 4.13.4 Clinical management
  • 4.13.5 Weight loss in men
  • 4.13.6 Conclusions
  • 4.13.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.14 Weight loss interventions in specific groups: Adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity
  • 4.14.1 Definition of intellectual disability
  • 4.14.2 Obesity in people with intellectual disabilities
  • 4.14.3 Determinants of obesity in intellectual disability
  • 4.14.4 Weight management interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities
  • 4.14.5 The role of carers
  • 4.14.6 Conclusion
  • 4.14.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.15 Weight maintenance following weight loss in obesity
  • 4.15.1 Introduction
  • 4.15.2 Importance of weight maintenance
  • 4.15.3 Evidence base for weight maintenance after weight loss
  • 4.15.4 The role of physical activity in weight maintenance
  • 4.15.5 Method of initial weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance success
  • 4.15.6 Unsuccessful weight maintenance
  • 4.15.7 Conclusion
  • 4.15.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 4.16 Economic cost of obesity and the cost-effectiveness of weight management
  • 4.16.1 Introduction
  • 4.16.2 The cost burden of obesity
  • 4.16.3 The economic impact of realistic weight management interventions
  • 4.16.4 Cost-effectiveness of weight management interventions
  • 4.16.5 Conclusion
  • 4.16.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Section 5 Aetiology of obesity in children
  • Chapter 5.1 Genetics, epigenetics and obesity: focus on studies in children
  • 5.1.1 Introduction
  • 5.1.2 The impact of genes on weight status
  • 5.1.3 Impact of genes on cardiovascular risk factors
  • 5.1.4 Summary
  • 5.1.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 5.2 Food intake, eating behaviour and obesity in children
  • 5.2.1 Introduction
  • 5.2.2 Exposure starts early
  • 5.2.3 Eating traits
  • 5.2.4 Self-regulation
  • 5.2.5 Conclusion
  • 5.2.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 5.3 Physical activity and inactivity in the aetiology of obesity in children
  • 5.3.1 Introduction
  • 5.3.2 Assessment of physical activity in children
  • 5.3.3 Current levels of physical activity among young people
  • 5.3.4 Physical activity and adiposity in children
  • 5.3.5 The issue of reverse or bidirectional causality
  • 5.3.6 Summary box
  • Useful web links
  • References
  • Section 6 Weight management in children
  • Chapter 6.1 Diet in the management of weight loss in childhood obesity
  • 6.1.1 Introduction
  • 6.1.2 Dietary intake in children
  • 6.1.3 Changing childhood eating behaviour
  • 6.1.4 Weight maintenance
  • 6.1.5 Summary box
  • Useful resources
  • References
  • Chapter 6.2 Physical activity in the management of weight loss in childhood obesity
  • 6.2.1 Defining 'physical activity'
  • 6.2.2 Physical activity as a component of energy expenditure
  • 6.2.3 Physical activity in children
  • 6.2.4 Physical activity and exercise recommendations
  • 6.2.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 6.3 Psychological and behavioural interventions in childhood obesity
  • 6.3.1 Background
  • 6.3.2 Treatment approaches of psychological interventions
  • 6.3.3 Evidence review
  • 6.3.4 Conclusion
  • 6.3.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 6.4 Residential programmes and weight loss camps in childhood obesity
  • 6.4.1 Introduction
  • 6.4.2 Evidence base for residential programmes
  • 6.4.3 Outcomes of residential programmes
  • 6.4.4 Weight loss camps
  • 6.4.5 Conclusion
  • 6.4.6 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 6.5 Pharmacological management of weight loss in childhood obesity
  • 6.5.1 Drugs used in childhood obesity
  • 6.5.2 Future developments
  • 6.5.3 Bariatric surgery in children
  • 6.5.4 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 6.6 Surgical management of weight loss in childhood obesity
  • 6.6.1 Introduction
  • 6.6.2 Preoperative assessment
  • 6.6.3 Surgical options
  • 6.6.4 Nutritional monitoring after surgery
  • 6.6.5 Conclusion
  • 6.6.6 Websites
  • 6.6.7 Summary box
  • References
  • Section 7 Public health and the prevention of obesity
  • Chapter 7.1 National campaigns to modify eating behaviour in the prevention of obesity
  • 7.1.1 National campaigns in the United Kingdom
  • 7.1.2 National campaigns worldwide
  • 7.1.3 Facilitating healthy change
  • 7.1.4 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 7.2 Increasing physical activity to prevent childhood obesity
  • 7.2.1 Definitions in exercise and health science
  • 7.2.2 International guidance on physical activity and sedentary behaviour in young people
  • 7.2.3 Epidemiology of overweight, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and cardiorespiratory fitness
  • 7.2.4 Interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary time
  • 7.2.5 Summary box
  • References
  • Chapter 7.3 Designing public health initiatives for the prevention of obesity
  • 7.3.1 Theory and practice base for obesity-related public health initiatives
  • 7.3.2 Population
  • 7.3.3 Intervention level
  • 7.3.4 Evaluation
  • 7.3.5 Outcomes
  • 7.3.6 Political/policy arena
  • 7.3.7 Conclusion
  • 7.3.8 Summary box
  • References
  • Index
  • EULA

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