Multilevel Inverters

Conventional and Emerging Topologies and Their Control
 
 
Elsevier (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 15. Dezember 2017
  • |
  • 228 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-812449-9 (ISBN)
 

Multilevel Inverters: Conventional and Emerging Topologies and Their Control is written with two primary objectives: (a) explanation of fundamentals of multilevel inverters (MLIs) with reference to the general philosophy of power electronics; and (b) enabling the reader to systematically analyze a given topology with the possibility of contributing towards the ongoing evolution of topologies. The authors also present an updated status of current research in the field of MLIs with an emphasis on the evolution of newer topologies. In addition, the work includes a universal control scheme, with which any given topology can be modulated. Extensive qualitative and quantitative evaluations of emerging topologies give researchers and industry professionals suitable solutions for specific applications with a systematic presentation of software-based modeling and simulation, and an exploration of key issues.

Topics covered also include power distribution among sources, voltage balancing, optimization switching frequency and asymmetric source configuration. This valuable reference further provides tools to model and simulate conventional and emerging topologies using MATLAB®/Simulink® and discusses execution of experimental set-up using popular interfacing tools.

The book includes a Foreword by Dr. Frede Blaabjerg, Fellow IEEE, Professor and VILLUM Investigator, Aalborg University, Denmark.

  • Includes a universal control scheme to help the reader learn the control of existing topologies and those which can be proposed in the future
  • Presents three new topologies. Systematic development of these topologies and subsequent simulation and experimental studies exemplify an approach to the development of newer topologies and verification of their working and experimental verification.
  • Contains a systematic and step-by-step approach to modelling and simulating various topologies designed to effectively employ low-power applications


Krishna Kumar Gupta is an avid teacher, researcher, consultant and an author. Dr. Gupta is currently serving as an Associate Professor, lecturing on Power Electronics, Control Systems and Circuit Theory. In the year 2015, Dr. Gupta was conferred upon with Young Scientist Award by the Government of Madhya Pradesh, India for his research on inverters. In 2016, he has been awarded by the Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) for his contribution in teaching.
Before taking up research on inverters, Dr. Gupta had varying tenures in Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL), Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) and National Institute of Technology (NIT) Raipur, India. Post PhD, he was offered a research position at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore but he was more keen to work on development of technologies for PV based power generation for rural India.
Dr. Gupta is a Member, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has authored several technical papers. He obtained his B.Tech., M.Tech. and Ph.D. degrees from Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT), Bhopal, India. He also serves as an active reviewer for many journals of international repute.
  • Englisch
  • Saint Louis
  • |
  • USA
  • 15,80 MB
978-0-12-812449-9 (9780128124499)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Multilevel Inverters
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Foreword
  • About the Authors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 Basics of Inverters
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Power Electronics as a Technology
  • 1.3 Concept of States: Example of an Inverter
  • 1.4 Waveform Analysis
  • 1.5 Filtering
  • 1.6 Sine-Triangle PWM
  • 1.7 Power Switch Requirements
  • 1.8 Summary
  • References
  • 2 Basics of Multilevel Inverters
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Multilevel Inverters
  • 2.2.1 Advantages of MLIs on Account of the Waveform
  • 2.2.2 Advantages of MLIs on Account of Topology
  • 2.3 Conventional Topologies
  • 2.3.1 CHB Inverter and Modulation Strategies
  • 2.3.2 Diode-Clamped Structure and Modulation Strategies
  • 2.3.3 FC Structure and Modulation Strategies
  • 2.4 Issues With Conventional Topologies
  • 2.5 Summary
  • References
  • 3 Advent of New Topologies
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Advent of New Topologies for MLIs
  • 3.3 MLI Topologies With Reduced Device Count
  • 3.3.1 Cascaded Half-Bridge-Based Multilevel DC Link Inverter
  • 3.3.2 T-Type Inverter
  • 3.3.3 Switched Series/Parallel Sources-Based MLI
  • 3.3.4 Series-Connected Switched Sources-Based MLI
  • 3.3.5 Cascaded "Bipolar Switches Cells"-Based MLI
  • 3.3.6 Packed U-Cell Topology
  • 3.3.7 Multilevel Module-Based MLI
  • 3.3.8 Reversing Voltage Topology
  • 3.3.9 Two-Switch Enabled Level Generation-Based MLI
  • 3.4 Summary
  • References
  • 4 Universal Control Scheme with Voltage-Level-Based Methods
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Modulation Strategies for MLIs
  • 4.2.1 Multicarrier PWM with Different Carrier Signals
  • 4.2.2 Multicarrier PWM with Different Modulating Signals
  • 4.2.3 SHE Technique
  • 4.3 Description of the UCS
  • 4.4 Implementation of UCS for a Five-Level Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter
  • 4.4.1 Simulation Model for Obtaining Aggregated Signal "a(t)"
  • 4.4.2 Simulation Model for Obtaining Actual Driving Pulses for a Five-Level Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter
  • 4.4.3 Simulation of a Five-Level Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter
  • 4.4.4 Experimental Implementation of a Five-Level Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter
  • 4.5 Implementation of UCS in Some Recently Proposed Topologies
  • 4.5.1 Implementation for 2SELG-Based MLI
  • 4.5.2 Implementation for Switched Series/Parallel Sources-Based MLI
  • 4.5.3 Implementation for Reversing Voltage Topology
  • 4.6 Summary
  • References
  • 5 Multilevel Inverter Based on Bridge-Type Connected Sources
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Conceptualization of Topology
  • 5.2.1 Principle of Operation
  • 5.2.2 Output Voltage
  • 5.2.3 Voltage Across Blocking Switches
  • 5.2.4 Power Switch Configuration
  • 5.3 Simulation Studies
  • 5.4 Experimental Validation of Nine-Level BCS-MLI With Trinary Sources
  • 5.5 Charge Balance Control in Asymmetrically Configured BCS-MLI
  • 5.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • 6 Cross-Connected Sources-Based Multilevel Inverter
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 CCS-MLI Topology and Principle of Operation
  • 6.3 Mathematical Formulations for CCS-MLI
  • 6.3.1 Switching Function for Output Voltage
  • 6.3.2 Currents Through Input Sources
  • 6.3.3 Currents Through Conducting Switches
  • 6.3.4 Voltage Stress on Blocking Switches
  • 6.4 Investigations on CCS-MLI With Symmetric Source Configuration
  • 6.4.1 Optimal Switching Operation of Five-Level Inverter Based on CCS-MLI
  • 6.4.2 Equal Load Sharing Amongst the Input DC Sources in a Five-Level CCS-MLI
  • 6.4.3 Optimal Switching Operation of Higher-Level Inverters (Number of Levels>5) Based on CCS-MLI
  • 6.4.4 Equal Load Sharing in Higher-Level Inverters (Number of Levels>5) Based on CCS-MLI
  • 6.5 CCS-MLI With Asymmetric Source Configuration
  • 6.5.1 Asymmetric Configuration for CCS-MLI
  • 6.6 Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Using Series Connection of Cross-Connected Sources-Based Submultilevel Inverters
  • 6.7 Cascaded Multilevel Inverter With Symmetric Sources
  • 6.7.1 Control Scheme
  • 6.7.2 Simulation Study
  • 6.7.3 Experimental Verification
  • 6.8 Cascaded Multilevel Inverter With Asymmetric Sources
  • 6.8.1 Control Scheme
  • 6.8.2 Simulation Study
  • 6.8.3 Experimental Verification
  • 6.9 Summary
  • References
  • 7 Comparison of Multilevel Inverter Topologies
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.1.1 Comparison With Classical Topologies
  • 7.1.2 Comparison With Reduced Device Count (RDC) Topologies
  • 7.2 Summary
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

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