Sorting and Recycling Endosomes

 
 
Academic Press Inc
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 21. September 2015
  • |
  • 416 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802871-1 (ISBN)
 
Sorting and Recycling Endosomes provides the latest information on endosomes, the receiving compartment for endocytosed cargos, and the donor compartment and sorting station for cargos designated to lysosomes, Golgi, or plasma membrane.

In recent years, the importance of endosomes as a sorting and recycling compartment has become increasingly appreciated. As such, scientists from various fields of cell biology, membrane traffic, and beyond, see the needs to communicate and learn about the methods used to investigate the dynamics and functions of endosomes.

This book brings together specialists from the field who contribute their expertise on a broad range of biomedical topics that will provide ideal reading for researchers interested in endosomal sorting and recycling. This volume covers the approaches necessary to study the key components that mediate the generation and transport of membrane-bounded carriers from the endosomes, and how membrane trafficking machinery is coordinated with cytoskeletons during these processes. In addition to studies carried out in mammalian cells, other model systems such as worm and yeast are also included.



- Provides the latest information on endosomes, the receiving compartment for endocytosed cargos, and the donor compartment and sorting station for cargos designated to lysosomes, Golgi, or plasma membrane.
- Covers an increasingly appreciated field in cell biology
- Includes both established and new technologies
- Brings together specialists from the field who contribute their expertise on a broad range of biomedical topics that will provide ideal reading for researchers interested in endosomal sorting and recycling
0091-679X
  • Englisch
  • USA
Elsevier Science & Technology (Digital)
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • Höhe: 235 mm
  • |
  • Breite: 191 mm
  • 8,49 MB
978-0-12-802871-1 (9780128028711)
0128028718 (0128028718)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1. Dynamic Imaging of the Recycling Endosomal Network in Macrophages
Adam A. Wall, Nicholas D. Condon, Jeremy C. Yeo, Nicholas A. Hamilton and Jennifer L. Stow
2. Analyzing the Functions of Rab11-Effector Proteins During Cell Division
Rytis Prekeris
3. Expression and Localization of Exocytic and Recycling Rabs from Magnaportheoryzae in Mammalian Cells
Yaoyao Qi, M. Caleb Marlin, Zhimin Liang, Dongmei Zhang, Jie Zhou, Zonghua Wang, Guodong Lu and Guangpu Li
4. Methods to Analyze Novel Liaisons Between Endosomes and Centrosomes
Hui-Fang Hung, Heidi Hehnly and Stephen Doxsey
5. Biochemical Analysis of Rabin8, the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Rab8
Bin Wu, Juanfei Wang, Yuting Zhao and Wei Guo
6. Simple In vitro Assay of Arf GAPs and Preparation of Arf Proteins as Substrates
Pei-Wen Chen, Xiaoying Jian, Ruibai Luo and Paul A. Randazzo
7. An ACAP1 Coat Complex Acting in Endocytic Recycling
Jian Li and Victor W. Hsu
8. Biochemical Methods for Studying Kinetic Regulation of Arf1 Activation by Sec7
Brian C. Richardson and J. Christopher Fromme
9. Rab and Arf G Proteins in Endosomal Trafficking
Dipannita Dutta and Julie G. Donaldson
10. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Endocytic Recycling
James B. Reineke, Shuwei Xie, Naava Naslavsky and Steve Caplan
11. Methods for Analyzing the Role of Phospholipase A2 Enzymes in Endosome Membrane Tubule Formation
Danielle N. Kalkofen, Paul de Figueiredo and William J. Brown
12. In vivo Analysis of Recycling Endosomes in C. elegans
Anbing Shi and Barth D. Grant
13. Monitoring Receptor Trafficking Following Retromer and WASH Deregulation
Douglas G. Osborne, Christine A Phillips-Krawczak and Daniel D. Billadeau
14. Quantitative Analysis of Endosome Tubulation and Microdomain Organization Mediated by the WASH Complex
Emmanuel Derivery and Alexis Gautreau
15. Rab GTPases and Kinesin Motors in Endosomal Trafficking
Cédric Delevoye and Bruno Goud
16. Measuring Receptor Recycling in Polarized MDCK Cells
Luciana Gallo and Gerard Apodaca
17. Structural and Functional Analysis of Endosomal Compartments in Epithelial Cells
Andres E. Perez Bay, Ryan Schreiner and Enrique Rodriguez-Boulan
18. Analyzing the Role of AP-1B in Polarized Sorting from Recycling Endosomes in Epithelial Cells
Heike Fölsch
19. Recycling of the Insulin Responsive Glucose Transporter Glut4 Regulated by the Small GTPase RalA and the Exocyst Complex
Chao Nie and Xiao-Wei Chen
20. GPCR Sorting at the Multivesicular Endosomes
Michael Robert Dores and JoAnn Trejo
21. Visualizing and Quantitating Sequence-Dependent GPCR Recycling
Shanna L. Bowman, Amanda L. Soohoo and Manojkumar A. Puthenveedu
22. Methods to Study Endocytic Trafficking of the EGF Receptor
Itziar Pinilla-Macua and Alexander Sorkin

Contributors


Gerard Apodaca,     Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Daniel D. Billadeau,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Shanna L. Bowman,     Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

William J. Brown,     Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Steve Caplan,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

Pei-Wen Chen,     Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

Xiao-Wei Chen

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, Beijing, China

PKU-THU Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China

Nicholas D. Condon,     Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Paul de Figueiredo

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Norman Borlaug Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Cédric Delevoye

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, Paris, France

CNRS UMR 144, Structure and Membrane Compartments, Paris, France

Emmanuel Derivery,     Department of Biochemistry, Sciences II, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

Julie G. Donaldson,     Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Michael Robert Dores,     Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA

Stephen Doxsey,     Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

Dipannita Dutta,     Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Heike Fölsch,     Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

J. Christopher Fromme,     Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Luciana Gallo,     Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Alexis Gautreau,     Laboratoire de Biochimie, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7654, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Cedex, France

Bruno Goud

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, Paris, France

CNRS UMR 144, Molecular Mechanisms of Intracellular Transport, Paris, France

Barth D. Grant,     Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA

Wei Guo,     Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Nicholas A. Hamilton

Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Research Computing Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Heidi Hehnly

Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA

Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Victor W. Hsu

Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Hui-Fang Hung,     Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

Xiaoying Jian,     Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

Danielle N. Kalkofen,     Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Guangpu Li

Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, China

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Jian Li

Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Zhimin Liang,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Guodong Lu,     Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, China

Ruibai Luo,     Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

M. Caleb Marlin,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Naava Naslavsky,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

Chao Nie,     Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, Beijing, China

Douglas G. Osborne,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Andres E. Perez Bay,     Margaret Dyson Vision Research Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA

Christine A. Phillips-Krawczak,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Itziar Pinilla-Macua,     Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Rytis Prekeris,     Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA

Manojkumar A. Puthenveedu,     Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Yaoyao Qi

Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, China

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Paul A. Randazzo,     Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

James B. Reineke,     Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

Brian C. Richardson,     Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

Enrique Rodriguez-Boulan,     Margaret Dyson Vision Research Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA

Ryan Schreiner,     Margaret Dyson Vision Research Institute, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA

Anbing Shi

Department of Medical Genetics, School of Basic Medicine and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China

Institute for Brain Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China

Amanda L. Soohoo,     Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Alexander Sorkin,     Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Jennifer L. Stow,     Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

JoAnn Trejo,     Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of...

Praise for the Series: "The series is invaluable for workers at all levels of cell biology." - NATURE

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