Novel Approaches of Nanotechnology in Food

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 13. Mai 2016
  • |
  • 772 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804379-0 (ISBN)
 
Novel Approaches of Nanotechnology in Food, a volume in the Nanotechnology in the Agri-Food Industry series, represents a summary of the most recent advances made in the field of nanostructured materials that have significant impact on the agri-food industry. Because the current food market needs innovation, nanotechnology coupled with novel interdisciplinary approaches and processing methods has enabled important advances that have the potential to revolutionize agri-food sector. Nanotechnology can serve to resolve challenges faced by the food and bioprocessing industries for developing and implementing systems that can produce qualitative and quantitative foods that are safe, sustainable, and ecofriendly. This book is a valuable resource for scientists, researchers, and engineers in food science and biotechnology fields, as well as students who want information on cutting-edge technologies.
  • Provides worldwide research applications of nanomaterials and nanotechnology useful in food research
  • Presents analytical methods for enzyme immobilization onto magnetic nanoparticles
  • Includes strategies of behavior and structure function to increase application enhancement and control
  • Discusses nanomaterial regulations and for consumer protection awareness
2451-9324
  • Englisch
  • Atlanta
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 23,95 MB
978-0-12-804379-0 (9780128043790)
0128043792 (0128043792)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Series Foreword
  • Series Preface
  • About the Series (Volumes I-X)
  • Volume Preface
  • 1 - An update of definitions and regulations regarding nanomaterials in foods and other consumer products
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Nanoregulations in Different Fields
  • 2.1 - Chemicals
  • 2.2 - Food
  • 2.3 - Food Contact Materials
  • 2.4 - Feed
  • 2.5 - Pesticides and Biocides
  • 2.6 - Cosmetics
  • 2.7 - Medicinal Products and Devices
  • 2.8 - Other Products
  • 2.9 - Environment
  • 3 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 2 - Recent advances in the application of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in food research
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Nanosensors
  • 3 - Nanocarriers
  • 4 - Nanoenabled Foods
  • 5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 3 - Magnetic separation of nanobiostructured systems for innovation of biocatalytic processes in food industry
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Magnetic Nanoparticles Behavior
  • 3 - Enzymes Immobilization
  • 4 - Magnetic Nanosupports
  • 5 - Immobilization of Enzymes Applied for Food Processing on Magnetic Nanoparticles
  • 5.1 - Hydrolases
  • 5.1.1 - Amylases
  • 5.1.2 - Galactosidases
  • 5.1.3 - Invertases
  • 5.1.4 - Pectinases
  • 5.1.5 - Proteases
  • 5.1.6 - Lipases
  • 5.2 - Isomerases
  • 5.2.1 - Glucose Isomerase
  • 5.3 - Lyases
  • 5.3.1 - Acetolactate Decarboxylase
  • 5.4 - Oxidoreductases
  • 5.4.1 - Glucose Oxidase
  • 5.4.2 - Laccase
  • 5.5 - Transferases
  • 5.5.1 - Cyclodextringlycosyltransferase
  • 6 - One-Step Method to Obtain Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Application for Bioethanol Production From A...
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 4 - Natural materials as additives in food emulsions
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Importance of Use of Natural Materials for Food Emulsions
  • 3 - Basics of Emulsions
  • 3.1 - Interactions Between Droplet Phase and Continuous Phase
  • 3.2 - Size Distribution of Dispersed Droplets in Emulsions
  • 3.3 - Droplets Coalescence
  • 3.4 - Competition of Droplets Breakup and Coalescence
  • 4 - Coalescence of Droplets During Emulsification
  • 4.1 - Antifoaming Effects in Emulsions
  • 4.2 - Using Sonication for Emulsification
  • 4.3 - Interfacial Interactions in Pickering Emulsions
  • 5 - Rheology of Food Emulsions
  • 5.1 - Behavior of Gels for Food Applications
  • 5.2 - Microstructure and Rheology of Food Gels
  • 6 - Natural Materials for Emulsification and Stabilization of Emulsions
  • 6.1 - Use of Proteins in Emulsification and Stabilization of Food Emulsions
  • 6.2 - Coconut Milk Protein for Food Emulsions
  • 6.3 - An Important Natural Gel: Aloe Vera Gel
  • 6.4 - Use of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) in Food Emulsions
  • 7 - Conclusions
  • Notations
  • References
  • 5 - Self-assembled carbohydrate nanostructures: synthesis strategies to functional application in food
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Self-Assembly, a Bottom-Up Approach
  • 3 - Categorization of Self-Assembly on Thermodynamic and Molecular Basis
  • 4 - Self-Assembled Carbohydrate Matrix, A Unique Carrier for Functional Food Formulations
  • 5 - Carbohydrate-Based Different Self-Assembled Nanostructures
  • 6 - Recent Advances in Carbohydrate-Based Self-Assembling Entities, its Preparation, and Applications
  • 7 - Carbohydrates From Plant Origin
  • 7.1 - Starch
  • 7.2 - Cyclodextrins
  • 7.3 - Inulin
  • 7.4 - Cellulose
  • 7.5 - Pectin
  • 8 - Carbohydrates From Animal Origin
  • 8.1 - Chitosan
  • 9 - Carbohydrates From Algal Origin
  • 9.1 - Sulfated Polysaccharides
  • 9.2 - Alginate
  • 9.3 - Agar
  • 9.4 - Microbial Polysaccharides
  • 10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 6 - Nanotechnology and wine
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Nanotechnologies Applied to Winemaking
  • 2.1 - Sensors for Wine Compounds Analysis
  • 2.2 - Electronic Tongue for Wine Classification
  • 2.3 - Nanoliquid Chromatography for Proteins and Biogenic Amines Analysis
  • 2.4 - Silver Nanoparticles as Antimicrobial Agent
  • 2.5 - Magnetic Separation of Yeasts in Sparkling Wines
  • 2.6 - Others
  • 2.6.1 - Nanoencapsulation of Wine Flavors
  • 2.6.2 - Package Nanotechnologies
  • 2.6.3 - Nanosensors and RFID Systems
  • 3 - Food Safety
  • 4 - Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • References
  • 7 - Effect of content and temperature on the phase transitions of polymer composites doped by kappa carrageenan and alg...
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Theoretical Considerations
  • 2.1 - Gelation
  • 2.2 - Stern-Volmer Model
  • 2.3 - Moving Boundary Model
  • 2.4 - Li-Tanaka Model
  • 2.5 - Fickian Model
  • 2.6 - Elasticity
  • 3 - Experimental
  • 3.1 - Preparation of PAAm-kC Composites
  • 3.2 - Preparation of Alginate Beads
  • 3.3 - Fluorescence Measurement
  • 3.4 - Mechanical Characteristics Measurement
  • 4 - PAAm-kC Composites
  • 4.1 - Gelation
  • 4.2 - Drying
  • 4.3 - Swelling
  • 4.4 - Elasticity
  • 5 - Alginates
  • 5.1 - Calcium Alginate Beads
  • 5.1.1 - Encapsulation Efficiency
  • 5.1.2 - Desorption Coefficients
  • 5.1.3 - Incubation Time
  • 5.2 - Alginate Beads with Different Metal Ions
  • 5.3 - Alginate with Nonionic and Ionic Surfactants
  • 6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 8 - Starch nanomaterials: a state-of-the-art review and future trends
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Starch Granule Architecture
  • 3 - Preparation of Starch Nanomaterials
  • 3.1 - Starch Nanocrystals
  • 3.1.1 - Acid Hydrolysis
  • 3.1.2 - Combined Approaches
  • 3.1.3 - Modification of Nanocrystals
  • 3.2 - Starch Nanoparticles
  • 3.3 - Starch Nanofibers
  • 4 - Characteristics of SNMs
  • 4.1 - Morphology
  • 4.2 - Surface Properties
  • 4.3 - Crystalline Properties
  • 4.4 - Thermal Properties
  • 4.5 - Rheological Properties
  • 5 - Applications of SNMs
  • 5.1 - Packaging
  • 5.2 - Delivery Systems
  • 5.3 - Emulsifying Agent
  • 5.4 - Fat Mimics
  • 6 - Concluding Remarks and Future Trends
  • References
  • 9 - Monitoring and separation of food-borne pathogens using magnetic nanoparticles
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Food-Borne Diseases: Present Scenario
  • 2.1 - Probable Risk Factors of Food Contamination
  • 2.2 - Customary Microbial Detection Techniques
  • 3 - Emergence of Nanotechnology in Food Pathogen Monitoring
  • 4 - Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Food-Borne Pathogen Monitoring
  • 4.1 - High Surface/Volume Ratio
  • 4.2 - High Magnetization Values
  • 4.3 - Superparamagnetism
  • 4.4 - Surface Modifications
  • 4.5 - Safety
  • 5 - Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles
  • 6 - Principle of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Separation of Food-Borne Pathogens
  • 7 - Magnetic Nanoparticle-Mediated Microbial Detection Techniques
  • 7.1 - Detection of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) and other Gram-Positive Bacteria
  • 7.2 - Immunomagnetic Methods for Pathogen Detection and Separation
  • 7.2.1 - Biofunctional Immunomagnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection of E. coli
  • 7.2.2 - Detection of E. coli O157:H7 Using Antibody Conjugated Magnetic Iron-Dextran Nanoparticles
  • 7.2.3 - Immunomagnetic Detection of Listeria from Food Products
  • 7.2.4 - Immunomagnetic Separation (IMS) Coupled with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to Detect Bacteria
  • 7.2.5 - Immunomagnetic Detection of Salmonella Bacteria
  • 7.2.6 - Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Immunomagnetic Detection of Multiple Bacteria
  • 7.3 - Core-Shell Structured Iron Oxide-Gold (Fe3O4-Au) Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs...
  • 7.4 - Amine Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles to Capture Bacteria
  • 7.5 - Immunomagnetic Detection Coupled with Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)
  • 7.6 - Magnetic Nanoparticles Coupled Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for Pathogen ...
  • 7.7 - Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors Food Pathogen Monitoring
  • 8 - Challenges in Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Food-Borne Pathogen Detection
  • 9 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 10 - Nanotechnology in healthier meat processing
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Nanotechnology: Science and Technology
  • 3 - Nanotechnology to Deliver Functional Ingredients
  • 3.1 - Technologies for the Delivery of Active Ingredients in Foods
  • 4 - Nanotechnology in Meat Systems
  • 4.1 - Production of Nanomaterials for Use in Meat Products
  • 4.2 - Potential Areas of Application in Meat Industry
  • 4.3 - Types of Nanomaterials
  • 4.3.1 - Nanoscale Ingredients
  • 4.3.2 - Nanoencapsulation
  • 4.3.2.1 - Association Colloids
  • 4.3.2.2 - Biopolymeric Nanomaterials
  • 4.3.2.3 - Nanoemulsion
  • 4.3.2.4 - Nanostructured Multiple Emulsions
  • 4.4 - Potentiality of Nanomaterials to Deliver Functional Ingredients in Meat Products
  • 4.4.1 - Nanotubes and Nanofibers
  • 4.4.2 - Nanodispersions and Nanocapsules
  • 4.5 - Nanotechnology in Meat Packaging
  • 4.5.1 - Types of Nanopackaging
  • 4.5.1.1 - Improved Nanopackaging for Meat Products
  • 4.5.1.2 - Active Nanopackaging
  • 4.5.1.3 - Smart Nanopackaging
  • 4.6 - Nanomaterials for Meat Packaging
  • 4.6.1 - Nanolaminates
  • 4.6.2 - Nanotracers in Meat Packaging
  • 4.6.3 - Nanosensors
  • 5 - Potential Risks of Using Nanotechnology in Food Processing
  • 6 - Problems Associated with the Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging
  • 7 - Regulations of Using Nanotechnology in Food Systems
  • 8 - Public Acceptance of Nanoproducts
  • 9 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 11 - Antimicrobial nanocomposites for food packaging applications: novel approaches
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials Used in Antimicrobial Nanocomposites
  • 2.1 - Silver Nanoparticles
  • 2.2 - Cellulose Nanoparticles
  • 2.3 - Clay Nanoparticles
  • 2.4 - Metal Oxide Nanoparticles
  • 2.5 - Copper Nanoparticles
  • 2.6 - Nanocarriers (Nanoliposomes, Carbon Nanotubes, and Mesoporous Materials)
  • 2.7 - Nanoemulsions
  • 2.8 - Other Nanoparticles
  • 3 - Polymers Used in Antimicrobial Nanocomposites
  • 3.1 - Nonbiodegradable Polymers
  • 3.2 - Biodegradable Polymers
  • 3.2.1 - Polymers from Natural Sources
  • 3.2.2 - Polymers Obtained from Synthesis Processes
  • 4 - Production Techniques: Electrospinning, Electrospraying, and Nanoencapsulation
  • 5 - Application of Nanocomposites for Food Packaging
  • 5.1 - Food Contact Active Packaging Materials
  • 5.2 - Modified Atmosphere and Gas Scavenging Packaging Materials
  • 5.3 - Commercial Developments
  • 6 - Physicochemical Properties of Antimicrobial Nanocomposites
  • 6.1 - Water Vapor Permeability and Gas Transport Properties
  • 6.2 - Mechanical Performance
  • 7 - Regulatory Aspects of Nanocomposites for Food Contact Applications
  • 8 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 12 - Nanomaterial-based sensors for mycotoxin analysis in food
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Aflatoxins
  • 2.1 - Detection of Aflatoxin B1
  • 2.2 - Novel On-Site Immunological Techniques for Detection of Aflatoxins AFB1 and AFB2
  • 2.3 - Simultaneous Determination of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2
  • 2.4 - Detection of Aflatoxin M1
  • 3 - Ochratoxin A
  • 3.1 - Simultaneous Determination of AFB1 and OTA
  • 4 - Sterigmatocystin
  • 5 - Zearalenone
  • 6 - Deoxynivalenol
  • 7 - Citrinin
  • 8 - Fumonisins
  • 9 - Conclusions and Future Perspective
  • References
  • 13 - Applications of chitosan as a functional food
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 1.1 - Precursor of Chitosan: Chitin. Chemical and Physical Characteristics
  • 2 - Chitosan, a Natural and Extraordinary Polymer
  • 3 - Industrial Applications of Chitosan
  • 3.1 - Chitosan as a Biomaterial
  • 4 - Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Chitosan
  • 4.1 - Chemical Mechanism of Chitosan Action in Relation to Antimicrobial Activity
  • 5 - Chemistry of Chitosan and Training Films
  • 6 - Chitosan and Yeast
  • 7 - Environmental Applications of Chitosan
  • 7.1 - Water Purification to Remove Heavy Metals Using Chitosan
  • 7.2 - Chitosan in Aquaculture
  • 8 - Chitosan in Cosmetics
  • 9 - Applications of Chitosan in the Textile Industry
  • 10 - Chitosan in the Preservation of Food Products
  • 10.1 - Chitosan in the Preservation of Fruits and Vegetables
  • 10.2 - Chitosan in Agriculture
  • 11 - Chitosan as a Dietary Supplement
  • 12 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 14 - Active food packaging from chitosan incorporated with plant polyphenols
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Chitosan Films
  • 2.1 - Physical Properties of Chitosan Films
  • 2.2 - Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films
  • 2.3 - Antioxidant Activity of Chitosan Films
  • 3 - Chitosan Films Incorporated With Plant Polyphenols
  • 3.1 - Chitosan Films Incorporated With Green Tea
  • 3.1.1 - Green Tea
  • 3.1.2 - Interaction of Chitosan and Green Tea Polyphenols
  • 3.1.3 - Physical Properties of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Green Tea
  • 3.1.4 - Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Green Tea
  • 3.1.5 - Antioxidant Activity of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Green Tea Extract
  • 3.2 - Chitosan Films Incorporated With Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 3.2.1 - Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 3.2.2 - Interaction of Chitosan and Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 3.2.3 - Physical Properties of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 3.2.4 - Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 3.2.5 - Antioxidant Activity of Chitosan Films Incorporated With Cinnamon Essential Oil
  • 4 - Active Chitosan Films and Coatings for Food Shelf Life Extension
  • 4.1 - Application to Meat Products
  • 4.2 - Application to Fish and Seafood
  • 4.3 - Application to Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
  • 5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 15 - Applications of nanotechnology in nutrition: potential and safety issues
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Carrier Materials
  • 3 - Challenges for Nutrient Nanoencapsulation
  • 4 - Applications
  • 5 - Digestion, Absorption, Metabolism, and Excretion
  • 5.1 - Digestion
  • 5.2 - Absorption
  • 5.2.1 - Size
  • 5.2.2 - Shape
  • 5.2.3 - Mucus
  • 5.2.4 - Ionic Charge
  • 5.2.5 - Hydrophobicity
  • 5.2.6 - Type of Material
  • 5.3 - Metabolism and Excretion
  • 5.4 - Excretion
  • 6 - Nanoformulations of Selected Nutrients
  • 6.1 - ß-Carotene
  • 6.2 - Vitamin D
  • 6.3 - Vitamin A
  • 6.4 - Vitamin E/a-Tocopherol
  • 6.5 - Vitamin C
  • 6.6 - Folic Acid
  • 6.7 - Iron
  • 6.8 - Zinc
  • 6.9 - Calcium
  • 6.10 - Selenium
  • 6.11 - Fatty Acids
  • 7 - Other Applications
  • 7.1 - Probiotics
  • 8 - Importance of Nanoparticle Characteristics and Barriers to Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery
  • 9 - Safety and Toxicity Implications of Nanotechnology in Food Science
  • 9.1 - Toxic Potential of Nanoparticles
  • 9.2 - Risk Assessment: Issues and Knowledge Gaps
  • 10 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 16 - Nanoencapsulation of green tea catechins and its efficacy
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - The Potential Health Benefits of EGCG
  • 3 - Biological Activities
  • 3.1 - Antioxidant Activity
  • 3.2 - Antimiotic
  • 3.3 - Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Regulation
  • 3.4 - Antiinflammatory
  • 3.5 - Antiangiogenic
  • 3.5.1 - Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
  • 3.5.2 - Matrix Metalloproteinases
  • 3.5.3 - Cadherin
  • 3.5.4 - Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1
  • 3.5.5 - Nuclear Factor-KappaB and Activator Protein 1
  • 3.5.6 - Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase
  • 3.5.7 - Cyclooxygenase-2
  • 3.5.8 - Insulin-Like Growth Factor
  • 3.5.9 - Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
  • 4 - Toxicity and Side Effects of EGCG
  • 5 - Low Bioavailability of EGCG
  • 6 - Nanotechnologies in Cancer Therapy
  • 7 - In Vivo Efficacy of Nanoencapsulated EGCG
  • 8 - Conclusions and Future Prospectives
  • References
  • 17 - Potential of nanomaterials in food packaging
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Passive Role of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging
  • 2.1 - 0-D Nanomaterials
  • 2.2 - 1-D Nanomaterials
  • 2.3 - 2-D Nanomaterials
  • 3 - Active Role of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging
  • 4 - Intelligent Role of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging
  • 5 - Direct Health Concerns
  • 6 - Environmental Issues
  • 7 - Outlook
  • References
  • 18 - A new approach for flavor and aroma encapsulation
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Encapsulation of Flavor Compounds
  • 2.1 - Spray Drying
  • 2.2 - Coacervation
  • 2.3 - Extrusion
  • 2.4 - Fluidized Bed Coating
  • 2.5 - Spray Cooling and Spray Chilling
  • 2.6 - Other Techniques
  • 3 - Nanotechnology
  • 3.1 - Flavors Nanoencapsulation
  • 3.2 - Nanotoxicology
  • 4 - Conclusions
  • References
  • 19 - Emerging trends in the application of nanobiosensors in the food industry
  • 1 - Introduction
  • 2 - Biosensors
  • 2.1 - Optical Biosensors
  • 2.2 - Electrochemical Biosensors
  • 2.3 - Piezoelectric Biosensors
  • 3 - Application of Nanobiosensors in Food Analysis
  • 3.1 - Detection of Harmful and Pathogenic Microbes
  • 3.2 - Detection of Microbial DNA
  • 3.3 - Detection of Pesticides
  • 3.4 - Detection of Sugar
  • 3.5 - Detection of Biotoxin
  • 3.6 - Detection of Gas
  • 3.7 - Detection of Carcinogen
  • 3.8 - Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms
  • 4 - Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 20 - Psychological and physiological bases of umami taste perception as related to nutrition
  • 1 - Why We Eat What We Eat
  • 1.1 - Physiological Motivation Stage
  • 1.2 - Safety Motivation Stage
  • 1.3 - Love and Belongingness Motivation Stage
  • 1.4 - Esteem Motivation Stage
  • 1.5 - Self-Actualization Motivation Stage
  • 1.6 - Human Motivation and Eating Behavior
  • 2 - Physiological Aspects of Umami Taste Perception
  • 2.1 - Physiological Fundamentals Underlying the Feeling of Deliciousness
  • 2.2 - Umami as a Basic Taste: A Sensory Marker Satisfying the Fundamental Physiological Demand
  • 2.3 - Physiological Basis of Umami Taste Perception
  • 2.4 - Physiological Basis of Umami Perception in Guts (Gut-Glutamate Sensation)
  • 2.5 - Ingestive Behavior: Beyond Protein Digestion to Appetite Control
  • 2.6 - Current Hypothesis: Physiological Fundamental on Umami Taste as a Protein Marker
  • 3 - Flavor Perception and Umami
  • 3.1 - Vision and Audition in Flavor Perception
  • 3.2 - Taste-Odor Interaction
  • 3.3 - Learned Synesthesia and Flavor Perception
  • 3.4 - Brain Mechanisms Involved in Flavor Perception
  • 3.5 - Umami as Flavor Component
  • 3.6 - Summary
  • 4 - Perception of Hunger and Umami
  • 4.1 - Physiological Hunger and Satiety
  • 4.2 - Psychological Hunger and Satiety
  • 4.3 - Eating Controlled by the Sensations
  • 4.4 - Eating Controlled by the Psychological Factors
  • 4.5 - Eating Controlled by the Beliefs
  • 5 - Summary and Conclusions
  • References
  • Subject index
  • Back cover

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