Percutaneous Surgery of the Upper Urinary Tract

Handbook of Endourology
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 28. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 208 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-802663-2 (ISBN)
 

Percutaneous Surgery of the Upper Urinary Tract: Handbook of Endourology contains five focused, review-oriented volumes that are ideal for students and clinicians looking for a comprehensive review rather than a whole course. Each volume is easily accessible through eBook format. Topics covered review both the endourological diagnosis and treatment of prostate, urethral, urinary bladder, upper urinary tract, and renal pathology. All chapters describe the most recent techniques, review the latest results, and analyze the most modern technologies.

In the past ten years, the field of endourology has expanded beyond the urinary tract to include all urologic minimally invasive surgical procedures. Recent advancements in robotic and laparoscopic bladder surgery make this one of the fastest moving fields in medicine.

As current textbooks are too time-consuming for busy urologists or trainees who also need to learn other areas of urology, this collection provides quick references and over 4000 images that are appropriate for fellows as well as those teaching in the field.


  • Offers review content for urologists in training and 'refresher" content for experts in endourology
  • Explores new surgical techniques and technology through review-level content and extensive images of pathologies
  • Includes over 500 images per volume; images taken from more than 4000 endourologic procedures performed annually at the editor's hospital
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 29,94 MB
978-0-12-802663-2 (9780128026632)
0128026634 (0128026634)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1 - History
  • References
  • Chapter 2 - Equipment and Instruments in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy
  • 2.1 - Operating room facilities
  • 2.1.1 - Operating Table
  • 2.1.2 - Video Equipment
  • 2.1.3 - Fluoroscopy Unit
  • 2.1.3.1 - Radiological Protection
  • 2.2 - Nephroscopes
  • 2.2.1 - Rigid Nephroscopes
  • 2.2.2 - Flexible Nephroscopes
  • 2.2.2.1 - External Configuration
  • 2.2.2.2 - Deflection Mechanism
  • 2.2.2.3 - Optical and Light Transmission System
  • 2.2.2.4 - Working Channel
  • 2.2.2.5 - Particularities of Accessory Instruments
  • 2.3 - Instruments used for achieving the percutaneous tract
  • 2.3.1 - Otis Urethrotome
  • 2.3.1.1 - Puncture Needles
  • 2.3.1.2 - Guidewires
  • 2.3.2 - Devices Used for Tract Dilation
  • 2.3.2.1 - Fascial Dilators
  • 2.3.2.2 - Lombotome
  • 2.3.2.3 - Alken Coaxial Dilators
  • 2.3.2.4 - Amplatz Dilators
  • 2.3.2.5 - Balloon Dilators
  • 2.3.3 - Instruments for Maintaining the Percutaneous Tract
  • 2.3.3.1 - Amplatz Sheath
  • 2.4 - Lithotripsy devices
  • 2.4.1 - Ballistic/Pneumatic Lithotripsy
  • 2.4.2 - Ultrasonic Lithotripsy
  • 2.4.3 - Combined Pneumatic and Ultrasonic Lithotripsy
  • 2.4.4 - Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy
  • 2.4.5 - Laser Lithotripsy
  • 2.5 - Extraction instruments
  • 2.6 - Nephrostomy tubes
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Percutaneous Approach in Renal Lithiasis
  • 3.1 - Indications
  • 3.1.1 - Indications for PCNL According to the Characteristics of the Lithiasis
  • 3.1.2 - Treatment of Renal Lithiasis on Malformed Kidneys
  • 3.1.3 - Treatment of Lithiasis in Caliceal Diverticula
  • 3.1.4 - Treatment of Renal Lithiasis in Children
  • 3.1.5 - Treatment of Renal Lithiasis on Transplanted Kidneys
  • 3.1.6 - Other Factors Involved in the Indication for PCNL
  • 3.1.7 - Contraindications
  • 3.2 - Preoperative assessment
  • 3.2.1 - Anamnesis
  • 3.2.2 - Physical Examination
  • 3.2.3 - Laboratory Investigations
  • 3.2.4 - Electrocardiogram
  • 3.2.5 - Imagistic Evaluation
  • 3.2.6 - Patients at Risk
  • 3.3 - Preoperative preparation
  • 3.3.1 - Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment
  • 3.3.2 - Irrigation Fluid
  • 3.4 - Anesthesia
  • 3.5 - Patient positioning
  • 3.5.1 - Nephrolithotomy With the Patient in Prone Position
  • 3.5.2 - Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy With the Patient in Supine Position
  • 3.5.2.1 - Advantages
  • 3.5.2.2 - Limitations
  • 3.5.3 - Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy With the Patient in Lateral Decubitus Position
  • 3.6 - Pyelocaliceal system puncture
  • 3.6.1 - Choosing the Type of Control of the Puncture
  • 3.6.1.1 - Fluoroscopic Control
  • 3.6.1.2 - Ultrasonographic Control
  • 3.6.1.3 - Combined Control
  • 3.6.1.4 - Other Types of Imagistic Control
  • 3.6.2 - Choosing the Puncture Site and the Type of Approach
  • 3.6.3 - Puncture Technique
  • 3.6.3.1 - Subcostal Approach
  • 3.6.3.2 - Intercostal Approach
  • 3.6.4 - Upper Caliceal Puncture Techniques by Subcostal Approach
  • 3.6.4.1 - Intercostal Percutaneous Approach With Caudal Kidney Mobilization
  • 3.6.4.2 - Triangulation
  • 3.6.5 - Particularities of Puncture Under Ultrasonographic Guidance
  • 3.6.6 - Particularities of Endoscopically Guided Puncture
  • 3.6.7 - Particularities of Puncture in Supine Position
  • 3.6.8 - Particularities of Puncture in Lateral Position
  • 3.6.9 - Puncture by Retrograde Approach (Lawson Technique)
  • 3.7 - Dilation of the puncture tract
  • 3.7.1 - Inserting the Metallic Guidewire
  • 3.7.2 - Preliminary Dilation
  • 3.7.3 - Creating the Actual Percutaneous Tract
  • 3.7.3.1 - Fascial Dilators
  • 3.7.3.2 - Amplatz-Type Malleable Dilators
  • 3.7.3.3 - Coaxial Metallic Dilators
  • 3.7.3.4 - Balloon Dilation Systems
  • 3.7.3.5 - Amplatz Dilator ("One-Shot" Dilation)
  • 3.7.3.6 - Dilation Under Ultrasonographic Control
  • 3.8 - Placing the working sheath
  • 3.9 - Extraction of stones
  • 3.10 - Placing the nephrostomy tube
  • 3.11 - Particularities of nephrolithotomy using flexible endoscopes
  • 3.11.1 - Preoperative Preparation
  • 3.11.2 - Anesthesia
  • 3.11.3 - Patient Positioning on the Operating Table
  • 3.11.4 - Puncture of the Pyelocaliceal System and Creating the Percutaneous Access Tract
  • 3.11.5 - Inspection of the Pyelocaliceal System
  • 3.11.6 - Fragmentation and/or Extraction of Lithiasic Fragments
  • 3.11.7 - Inspection of the Entire Pyelocaliceal System for Identifying Lithiasic Remnants
  • 3.11.8 - Placing the Nephrostomy Tube
  • 3.12 - Particular situations
  • 3.12.1 - Soft Lithiasis
  • 3.12.2 - Pyeloureteral Duplicity
  • 3.12.3 - Horseshoe Kidney
  • 3.13 - Complications of percutaneous approach in renal lithiasis
  • 3.13.1 - Intraoperative Incidents and Complications
  • 3.13.1.1 - Deterioration of Instruments
  • 3.13.1.2 - Losing the PCNL Tract During the Procedure
  • 3.13.1.3 - Perforation of the Renal Pelvis
  • 3.13.1.4 - Migration of an Extrarenal Lithiasic Fragment
  • 3.13.1.5 - Pyeloureteral Junction Wounds
  • 3.13.1.6 - Injuries of the Neighboring Organs
  • 3.13.1.7 - Bleeding
  • 3.13.1.8 - Absorption of the Irrigation Fluid
  • 3.13.1.9 - Leakage of the Irrigation Fluid
  • 3.13.1.10 - Hypothermia
  • 3.13.1.11 - Allergic Reactions to Contrast Medium
  • 3.13.2 - Early Postoperative Complications
  • 3.13.2.1 - Postoperative Bleeding
  • 3.13.2.2 - Retroperitoneal Hematoma
  • 3.13.2.3 - Septic Complications
  • 3.13.2.4 - Nephrocutaneous Fistula
  • 3.13.3 - Late Postoperative Complications
  • 3.13.3.1 - Pyeloureteral Junction Stenosis and Ureteral Stenosis
  • 3.13.3.2 - Infundibular Stenosis
  • 3.13.3.3 - Arterio-Venous Fistula With or Without Pseudoaneurysm
  • 3.13.3.4 - Perirenal Purulent Collections
  • 3.13.3.5 - Residual Foreign Bodies
  • 3.14 - Results of percutaneous approach for renal lithiasis
  • 3.14.1 - Results of Rigid Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy
  • 3.14.2 - Results of Flexible Nephroscopy
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - Percutaneous Approach of Caliceal Diverticula
  • 4.1 - Generalities
  • 4.2 - Indications
  • 4.3 - Techniques
  • 4.3.1 - Direct Percutaneous Approach
  • 4.3.1.1 - Positioning the Patient
  • 4.3.1.2 - Placing the Ureteral Catheter
  • 4.3.1.3 - Puncture of the Diverticulum
  • 4.3.1.4 - Creating the Percutaneous Tract
  • 4.3.1.5 - The Extraction of Intradiverticular Calculi
  • 4.3.1.6 - Management of the Diverticular Cavity and the Neck
  • 4.3.1.7 - Placing the Nephrostomy Tube
  • 4.3.2 - Indirect Percutaneous Approach
  • 4.4 - Complications
  • 4.5 - Results
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - Percutaneous Approach in Pyeloureteral Junction Stenosis
  • 5.1 - Generalities
  • 5.1.1 - Congenital UPJ Stenosis
  • 5.1.2 - Acquired UPJ Obstruction
  • 5.1.3 - Diagnosis of UPJ Obstruction
  • 5.2 - Indications and contraindications
  • 5.3 - Technical elements of antegrade endopyelotomy
  • 5.4 - Results
  • 5.5 - Complications
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - Percutaneous Approach in Ureteral Pathology
  • 6.1 - Generalities
  • 6.2 - Indications
  • 6.3 - Technical elements in antegrade ureteroscopy
  • 6.3.1 - Postoperative Follow-Up
  • 6.4 - Results
  • 6.5 - Complications
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Percutaneous Approach of Upper Urinary Tract Tumors
  • 7.1 - Generalities
  • 7.2 - Indications and contraindications
  • 7.3 - Surgical technique elements
  • 7.3.1 - Adjuvant Therapy
  • 7.4 - Postoperative follow-up protocol
  • 7.5 - Results
  • 7.6 - Complications
  • References
  • Chapter 8 - Percutaneous Nephrostomy
  • 8.1 - Indications
  • 8.2 - Contraindications
  • 8.3 - Instruments
  • 8.4 - Preoperative preparation
  • 8.5 - Steps of the intervention
  • 8.6 - Complications
  • 8.7 - Results
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Percutaneous Approach of Renal Cysts
  • 9.1 - Generalities
  • 9.2 - Therapeutic indications
  • 9.3 - Preoperative evaluation
  • 9.3.1 - Clinical and Laboratory Evaluation
  • 9.3.2 - Imaging Evaluation
  • 9.3.3 - Puncture and Aspiration of the Cyst for Diagnostic Purposes
  • 9.4 - Operative technique
  • 9.4.1 - Puncture Followed by Sclerosis of the Cavity
  • 9.4.2 - Other Alternatives of Percutaneous Treatment
  • 9.5 - Intraoperative and postoperative complications
  • 9.6 - Results
  • 9.7 - Other therapeutic methods
  • References
  • Chapter 10 - Percutaneous Approach of Renal and Perirenal Suppurations
  • 10.1 - Generalities
  • 10.2 - Indications
  • 10.3 - Techniques
  • 10.3.1 - Patient Positioning
  • 10.3.2 - Anesthesia
  • 10.3.3 - Control of the Intervention
  • 10.3.4 - Cavity Puncture
  • 10.3.5 - Evacuation of the Purulent Content
  • 10.3.6 - Abscess Drainage
  • 10.4 - Complementary measures for percutaneous drainage
  • 10.5 - Extracting the drainage tube
  • 10.6 - Complications
  • 10.7 - Results
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Percutaneous Approach of Upper Urinary Tract Iatrogenic Lesions
  • References
  • Subject Index
  • Back cover

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