Making Innovation Last: Volume 1

Sustainable Strategies for Long Term Growth
 
 
Palgrave MacMillan (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 2. November 2015
  • |
  • XVII, 255 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-137-56098-8 (ISBN)
 
Making Innovation Las t considers the long term success of a firm. Authored by a trio of top international scholars who present pioneering new work on what it takes to create long term growth, the book examines the internal conditions that are likely to encourage sustainable innovation, as well as what a culture of innovation should look like.
1st ed. 2016
  • Englisch
  • London
  • |
  • Großbritannien
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Bibliographie
  • 1,44 MB
978-1-137-56098-8 (9781137560988)
1137560983 (1137560983)
10.1007/978-1-137-56098-8
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Hubert Gatignon is the Claude Janssen Chaired Professor of Business Administration at INSEAD. His research interests involve the marketing of innovations, marketing strategy and statistical analysis of management data. ISI web of knowledge identifies Hubert Gatignon as a Highly Cited Researcher and he is the recipient of the 2014 EMAC Distinguished Marketing Scholar Award. Dr. Gatignon is an Associate Editor of JMR and he serves on the editorial boards of several leading marketing journals.

David Gotteland is Professor of Marketing at Grenoble Ecole de Management, France and has been visiting Scholar at INSEAD. His research interests include innovation strategies and the strategic orientation of firms. He has served as both the Head of and the Scientific Advisor of the Marketing Department at Grenoble Ecole de Management.

Christophe Haon is Professor of Marketing at Grenoble Ecole de Management, France. He is interested in marketing strategy and especially in new product and service development. He is currently the Scientific Advisor of the Marketing Department and the Leader of the Marketing Research Team at Grenoble Ecole de Management.
  • Cover
  • Making Innovation Last: Volume 1
  • Contents
  • List of Tables
  • List of Figures
  • Foreword
  • Preface and Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 1.1 Innovation and performance
  • 1.2 Book philosophy and outline
  • References
  • Part I: Understanding Innovations
  • 2: Assessing Innovations from the Technology Perspective
  • 2.1 Innovations as subsystems or modules
  • 2.2 Locus of innovation: core versus peripheral innovations
  • 2.3 Innovation types: modular, generational, and architectural
  • 2.3.1 Modular innovations
  • 2.3.2 Generational innovations
  • 2.3.2.1 Generational consolidation
  • 2.3.2.2 Generational expansion
  • 2.3.3 Architectural innovations
  • 2.4 Innovation characteristics
  • 2.4.1 Incremental versus radical innovations
  • 2.4.2 Competence-enhancing versus competence-destroying innovations
  • 2.4.3 New competence acquisition innovations
  • 2.5 Product versus process innovations
  • 2.6 The interrelated effects of the technological dimensions of innovation
  • 2.6.1 Economic and organizational radicalness
  • 2.6.2 Architectural and competence-enhancing/destroying innovations
  • 2.6.3 Peripheral and competence-enhancing innovations
  • 2.6.4 Innovation radicalness and competence destroying
  • 2.6.5 Competence enhancing and new competence acquisition
  • Note
  • References
  • 3: Assessing Innovations from the Market Point of View
  • 3.1 The consumer's perception of innovation
  • 3.1.1 Customer's perception of product or service newness
  • 3.1.2 Innovativeness as a personality trait
  • 3.2 Rogers's innovation characteristics
  • 3.2.1 Relative advantage
  • 3.2.2 Compatibility
  • 3.2.3 Trialability
  • 3.2.4 Observability
  • 3.2.5 Complexity
  • 3.3 Perceived risk
  • 3.4 Measures of innovation characteristics
  • 3.5 The relationships among innovation characteristics
  • 3.6 Serving the needs of existing customers versus new customers
  • 3.7 Bringing together technology and marketing perspectives
  • 3.7.1 Combining dimensions
  • 3.7.2 Industry evolution and dominant designs
  • Notes
  • References
  • Part II: Organizational Context for Innovations
  • 4: Strategic and Market Orientations
  • 4.1 What are the key strategic orientation choices and their effects on innovation?
  • 4.1.1 Market orientation
  • 4.1.1.1 The implementation of the marketing concept
  • 4.1.1.2 A complex multidimensional concept
  • 4.1.1.2.1 Customer orientation
  • 4.1.1.2.2 Competitor orientation
  • 4.1.1.2.3 From market orientation to stakeholder orientation
  • 4.1.2 Market orientation and innovation
  • 4.1.2.1 Does customer orientation improve the firm's ability to innovate?
  • 4.1.2.2 Does market orientation improve product radicalness?
  • 4.1.2.3 Does market orientation lead to greater innovation success?
  • 4.1.3 Alternative strategic orientations
  • 4.1.3.1 Technology orientation
  • 4.1.3.2 Production orientation
  • 4.1.3.3 Selling orientation
  • 4.1.3.4 Entrepreneurial orientation
  • 4.2 Market orientation and innovation: contingencies and explanatory mechanisms
  • 4.2.1 Environmental and organizational contingencies
  • 4.2.1.1 Contextual effects of market orientation on the firm's ability to innovate
  • 4.2.1.2 Contextual effects of market orientation on innovation success
  • 4.2.2 Explanatory mechanisms: market orientation improves the new product development process
  • 4.3 How can a firm become more market oriented?
  • 4.3.1 Metrics of progress in implementing a market-oriented culture
  • 4.3.2 How can a firm transform its organizational culture to be more market oriented?
  • 4.3.2.1 A process of organizational change
  • 4.3.2.2 The role of management
  • 4.3.2.2.1 Implementing a market-oriented culture
  • 4.3.2.2.2 Developing the ability to innovate
  • Notes
  • References
  • 5: Managing Capabilities
  • 5.1 About learning from outside knowledge
  • 5.1.1 Defining absorptive capacity
  • 5.1.1.1 Recognition and acquisition of valuable new knowledge
  • 5.1.1.2 Sustained assimilation of new knowledge
  • 5.1.1.3 Application of new knowledge
  • 5.1.2 Measuring absorptive capacity
  • 5.1.2.1 Proxy utilization
  • 5.1.2.2 Unidimensional scales
  • 5.1.2.3 Multidimensional scales
  • 5.2 Absorptive capacity and innovation
  • 5.2.1 Absorptive capacity and new products
  • 5.2.1.1 Impact on development process performance
  • 5.2.1.2 Impact on new product performance
  • 5.2.2 Absorptive capacity and firm capabilities
  • 5.2.2.1 Technological capability and innovation
  • 5.2.2.2 Marketing capability and innovation
  • 5.2.2.3 Complementarity of marketing and technological capabilities
  • 5.3 Organizational antecedents of absorptive capacity
  • 5.3.1 Organizational culture
  • 5.3.1.1 Preparedness for the consequences of new knowledge absorption
  • 5.3.1.2 Culture and informational behaviors
  • 5.3.2 Organizational structure
  • 5.3.2.1 Centralization
  • 5.3.2.2 Formalization
  • 5.3.2.3 Routinization
  • 5.3.3 Organizational processes
  • 5.3.3.1 Employees' empowerment
  • 5.3.3.2 Interfunctional coordination
  • 5.3.3.3 Informal social processes
  • 5.4 Environmental turbulence and absorptive capacity
  • 5.4.1 Technological turbulence
  • 5.4.2 Market turbulence
  • Notes
  • References
  • 6: When to Forge Alliances?
  • 6.1 A typology of R&D organization and governance
  • 6.1.1 Outsourcing versus innovation alliances
  • 6.1.2 Horizontal versus vertical alliances
  • 6.1.3 Codevelopment alliances
  • 6.1.4 Equity versus nonequity partnerships
  • 6.1.5 Open and closed innovation alliances
  • 6.1.6 The networked firm for innovation creation and marketing
  • 6.2 Factors leading to R&D alliance choice
  • 6.2.1 Product category-specific assets
  • 6.2.2 Internal (behavioral) uncertainty
  • 6.2.2.1 Ability to measure innovation performance
  • 6.2.2.2 Firm's experience in alliances
  • 6.2.3 External uncertainty
  • 6.2.3.1 Demand volatility
  • 6.2.3.2 Technology uncertainty
  • 6.2.3.3 External uncertainty and asset specificity interaction
  • 6.2.4 Soft tools to fight opportunism
  • 6.3 Who to partner with?
  • 6.3.1 Horizontal versus vertical alliances
  • 6.3.2 Relational embeddedness and knowledge redundancy
  • 6.3.3 Size asymmetry
  • 6.3.4 Nature of partners
  • 6.3.5 Strategic innovation alliances
  • 6.3.6 Organizational fit
  • 6.3.7 Compatibility of goals
  • 6.3.8 Regional clusters
  • 6.4 International alliances
  • Note
  • References
  • Index

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