Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry

Tools for Implementation
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 10. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 334 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-803793-5 (ISBN)
 

Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry: Tools for Implementation is an indispensable resource for the food industry to introduce innovations in the market, stand out from the competition and satisfy consumer demands. This reference reports the most trend advances of the food science, while providing insights and ideas to overcome limitations for their actual implementation in the industry. Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry: Tools for Implementation fills the gap between strategy developers and technical R&D associates by interpreting the technological adequacy of innovative techniques with the reaction of related consumers. It deals with the interaction of academia and industry, describing innovation and long term R&D strategies to overcome bottlenecks during know-how transfer between these two sectors.


  • Reports the development of cooperative networks for the commercialization of new food products
  • Includes the concept of open innovation, denoting the particular issues that SMEs are facing during their innovation efforts and suggest respective innovation policies in the agrifood sector
  • Discusses the challenges of introducing innovations in traditional food products
  • Describes the sustainability problems and restrictions (safety and energy issues) of innovations in food processing and emerging technologies
  • Exploits the cutting-edge innovation cases of food science and their applications in the food industry
  • Addresses the observed problems and provides solutions to meet market and consumers' needs
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 5,16 MB
978-0-12-803793-5 (9780128037935)
0128037938 (0128037938)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry
  • Innovation Strategies in the Food Industry: Tools for Implementation
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • A - INNOVATION STRATEGIES AND LONG TERM R & D FORTHE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 1 - FOOD INNOVATION DYNAMICS AND NETWORK SUPPORT
  • 1.1 INTRODUCTION: SECTOR CHALLENGES AND INNOVATION
  • 1.2 THE NETWORK ENVIRONMENT FOR INNOVATION SUPPORT
  • 1.2.1 NETWORK FOCUS
  • 1.2.2 INCEPTION AND DYNAMICS
  • 1.2.3 NETWORK PERFORMANCE AND LIMITATIONS
  • 1.3 DRIVERS AND ENABLERS
  • 1.3.1 OVERVIEW
  • 1.3.2 DRIVERS FOR INNOVATION
  • 1.3.2.1 Overview
  • 1.3.2.2 Food security and safety
  • 1.3.2.3 Transparency
  • 1.3.2.4 Urbanization
  • 1.3.2.5 Society's ethical concerns
  • 1.3.3 ENABLERS FOR INNOVATION
  • 1.3.3.1 Overview
  • 1.3.3.2 Information science and technology
  • 1.3.3.3 Natural science and engineering
  • 1.3.3.4 Management and information technology
  • 1.4 EMERGING INNOVATIONS
  • 1.4.1 OVERVIEW
  • 1.4.2 DEALING WITH THE CHALLENGE OF MEAT CONSUMPTION
  • 1.4.2.1 Classical developments
  • 1.4.2.2 Emerging inventions toward innovation
  • 1.4.3 SERVING URBAN POPULATIONS
  • 1.4.3.1 Classical developments
  • 1.4.3.2 Emerging inventions toward innovation
  • 1.4.4 SUPPORTING REGIONAL SOURCING FOR TRANSPARENCY AND TRUST
  • 1.4.5 MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS
  • 1.4.5.1 Classical developments
  • 1.4.5.2 Emerging inventions toward innovation
  • 1.4.6 CUSTOM-MADE PRODUCTS IN FOOD DELIVERIES
  • 1.4.7 OPEN INNOVATION FOR COMMUNICATION SUPPORT
  • 1.5 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX: CASE STUDY NETWORK IDENTIFICATION (DEITERS AND SCHIEFER, 2012)
  • 2 - OPEN INNOVATION AND INCORPORATION BETWEEN ACADEMIA AND FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 2.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 2.2 OI IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 2.3 MODELS OF OI IMPLEMENTATION
  • 2.3.1 THE CONNECT AND DEVELOP MODEL
  • 2.3.2 THE SHARING IS WINNING MODEL
  • 2.3.3 THE FOOD-MACHINERY FRAMEWORK
  • 2.3.4 THE LIVING-LAB OI MODEL
  • 2.3.5 THE WANT, FIND, GET, MANAGE MODEL
  • 2.3.6 THE VALUE COCREATION MODEL
  • 2.3.7 THE SELECTIVE SHARING OI APPROACH
  • 2.3.8 THE CONSUMER-CENTRIC OI MODEL
  • 2.4 THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • 2.5 AGENDA FOR FUTURE RESEARCH
  • REFERENCES
  • 3 - OPEN INNOVATION OPPORTUNITIES FOCUSING ON FOOD SMES
  • 3.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 3.2 SMES AND LARGE COMPANIES
  • 3.3 NOVELTY STATUS OF OI IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 3.4 OI APPLICATION IN LARGE AND MULTINATIONAL FOOD INDUSTRY COMPANIES
  • 3.5 RADICAL OPENNESS AND DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION
  • 3.6 SME UTILIZATION OF OI
  • 3.7 OI IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES IN SMES
  • 3.8 SOLUTION BROKERAGE HOUSES: ROLES AND SELECTION
  • 3.9 ROLES FOR ACADEMIA
  • 3.10 REVISED INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MODEL
  • 3.11 SELECTED SME EXAMPLES
  • 3.11.1 EU ACTIVITIES
  • 3.11.1.1 TRAFOON project
  • 3.11.1.2 HighTech Europe
  • 3.11.2 STATE SUPPORT
  • 3.11.3 ACADEMIA-SMES
  • 3.11.4 LC-SMES
  • 3.12 FUTURE TRENDS, CHALLENGES, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • 4 - TRANSITION TO A SUSTAINABLE AGRO-FOOD SYSTEM: THE ROLE OF INNOVATION POLICIES
  • 4.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 4.2 THE GROWING PRESSURE ON THE AGRO-FOOD SYSTEM
  • 4.2.1 POPULATION GROWTH, FOOD SECURITY, AND CLIMATE CHANGE
  • 4.2.2 FOOD CROPS VERSUS OTHER LAND USE
  • 4.2.3 MANAGING AND AVOIDING WASTE
  • 4.3 TRANSITION THEORY AS A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR SUSTAINABILITY
  • 4.3.1 SOCIOTECHNICAL TRANSITION AND THE MULTILEVEL PERSPECTIVE
  • 4.3.2 SUSTAINABILITY TRANSITIONS
  • 4.4 TURNING CHALLENGES INTO OPPORTUNITIES: FROM WASTE TO WEALTH
  • 4.4.1 FOOD SHARING AS A STRATEGY FOR SOURCE REDUCTION
  • 4.4.2 FOOD BANKS AS A STRATEGY FOR FOOD RESCUE
  • 4.5 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • B - DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIONS IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 5 - INNOVATION IN TRADITIONAL FOOD PRODUCTS: DOES IT MAKE SENSE?
  • 5.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 5.2 WHAT DO TRADITIONAL AND INNOVATION MEAN FOR EUROPEAN CONSUMERS?
  • 5.3 INNOVATIONS IN TRADITIONAL FOODS
  • REFERENCES
  • 6 - consumer driven and consumer perceptible food innovation
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.1.1 A Short History of Consumer Research and How It Drives or Doesn't Drive Food Innovation
  • 6.1.2 The History: Changing From Selling What Is Available to Answering Consumer Demand
  • 6.2 Psychophysical Thinking: A Major Foundation for Consumer-driven Innovation
  • 6.3 Applying Psychophysical Thinking in the Early Days: Studies of Taste Mixtures
  • 6.4 Beyond Simple Psychophysics to Mixture Psychophysics: The Jump Toward Innovation
  • 6.6 Innovation by Discovering and Exploiting Sensory Preference Segments
  • 6.7 Innovation by Modeling, Reverse Engineering and Discovering Holes in a Product Category
  • 6.8 Innovation by Experimental Design Coupled With Sensory Preference Segmentation
  • 6.8.1 Experience #1: Creating "Zesty" for Vlasic
  • 6.8.2 Experience #2: Creating Three Prego Sauces
  • 6.8.3 Experience #3: Tropicana's Grovestand Orange Juice
  • 6.9 Innovation Using Experimental Design of Ideas to Create New Products
  • 6.10 Innovation Using Mind-set Segmentation
  • Targeted 1:1 Design and 1:1 Messaging
  • 6.10.1 Targeted Design
  • 6.10.2 The Personal Viewpoint Identifier
  • 6.10.3 Create the Digital Viewpoint Identifier
  • 6.11 Innovation by Changing the Development Paradigm: Empathy and Experiment
  • 6.12 Discussion: Whither Innovation in a Slowly Moving Category
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • 7 - IMPLEMENTATION OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
  • 7.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 7.2 COMMERCIALIZATION, SAFETY DATA, AND ENERGY
  • 7.2.1 HIGH-PRESSURE PROCESSING
  • 7.2.2 PULSED ELECTRIC FIELD
  • 7.2.3 OHMIC HEATING
  • 7.2.4 MICROWAVE HEATING
  • 7.2.5 ULTRASOUND
  • 7.3 IMPLEMENTATION OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 7.3.1 THE CASE OF ORANGE JUICE
  • 7.3.2 THE CASE OF MILK
  • 7.3.3 THE CASE OF OYSTERS
  • 7.3.4 MEASURES FOR IMPLEMENTATION INCREASING
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • 8 - SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION IN FOOD SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
  • 8.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 8.2 FORMULATION AND BLENDING
  • 8.3 CULTIVATION AND BREEDING
  • 8.4 MICROENCAPSULATION
  • 8.5 EDIBLE FILMS AND COATINGS
  • 8.6 VACUUM IMPREGNATION
  • 8.7 NUTRIGENOMICS
  • 8.8 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • C - CUTTING EDGE INNOVATION AREAS IN THE FOOD SCIENCE
  • 9 - INNOVATIVE BIOBASED MATERIALS FOR PACKAGING SUSTAINABILITY
  • 9.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 9.2 NOVEL BIOBASED PLASTICS
  • 9.2.1 STARCH AND STARCH BLENDS
  • 9.2.2 POLY(LACTIC ACID)
  • 9.2.3 POLYHYDROXYALKANOATES
  • 9.3 EDIBLE FILMS AND COATINGS
  • 9.3.1 COMPOSITION OF EDIBLE FILMS AND COATINGS
  • 9.3.2 EDIBLE PACKAGING APPLICATIONS
  • 9.4 NANOCOMPOSITES FOR BIOBASED PACKAGING
  • 9.5 BIOPOLYMER-BASED ANTIMICROBIAL PACKAGING
  • 9.5.1 ORGANIC ACIDS AND SALTS
  • 9.5.2 ESSENTIAL OILS
  • 9.5.3 ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES
  • 9.5.4 FILMS CONTAINING LIVING MICROBIAL CELLS
  • 9.5.5 INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES
  • 9.6 REGULATIONS AND SAFETY CONCERNS
  • 9.7 CONCLUSIONS
  • INTERNET SITES
  • REFERENCES
  • 10 - DEVELOPMENT OF FUNCTIONAL FOODS
  • 10.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 10.2 LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR FUNCTIONAL FOODS
  • 10.2.1 EUROPE
  • 10.2.2 UNITED STATES
  • 10.2.3 JAPAN
  • 10.3 SCIENTIFIC SUBSTANTIATION OF CLAIMS
  • 10.3.1 DESIGN OF STUDY
  • 10.3.2 CONDUCTION OF THE STUDY
  • 10.3.3 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS
  • 10.4 FOOD INDUSTRY-FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE PRODUCTION OF AND INNOVATION IN FUNCTIONAL FOODS
  • 10.5 OPPORTUNITIES IN FUNCTIONAL FOOD INNOVATION
  • 10.5.1 TOP FOOD INNOVATION TRENDS
  • 10.5.2 THE INNOVATION SYSTEM
  • 10.5.3 EUROPEAN AND SPANISH PROJECTS
  • 10.5.4 FOOD TECHNOLOGY PLATFORMS
  • 10.6 CONCLUSIONS
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • 11 - FOOD USE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION BY OPTIMIZING FOOD WASTE RECOVERY STRATEGIES
  • 11.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 11.2 FOOD WASTE RECOVERY FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS
  • 11.3 UNIVERSAL RECOVERY STRATEGY
  • 11.4 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE STRATEGY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMERCIALLY VIABLE PRODUCTS
  • 11.5 MANAGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
  • 11.6 PROBLEMS
  • 11.7 SOLUTIONS
  • 11.8 MEETING MARKETS' AND CONSUMERS' NEEDS
  • REFERENCES
  • 12 - ADOPTION OF ICT INNOVATIONS IN THE AGRI-FOOD SECTOR: AN ANALYSIS OF FRENCH AND SPANISH INDUSTRIES
  • 12.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 12.2 THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
  • 12.2.1 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FIRM
  • 12.2.2 THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
  • 12.3 METHOD
  • 12.3.1 SAMPLE, VARIABLES, AND MODEL
  • 12.3.2 DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS
  • 12.4 RESULTS
  • 12.5 CONCLUSIONS
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • REFERENCES
  • 13 - IMPLEMENTATION OF FOODOMICS IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 13.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 13.2 FOODOMICS TECHNOLOGIES AND TECHNIQUES
  • 13.3 APPLICATIONS OF FOODOMICS
  • 13.3.1 FOOD QUALITY, AUTHENTICITY, TRACEABILITY, AND SAFETY
  • 13.3.2 FOODOMICS AND TRANSGENIC FOODS
  • 13.3.3 BIOMARKERS OF FOOD INTAKE
  • 13.3.4 BIOMARKERS OF METABOLIC DISEASES
  • 13.3.5 HEALTH EFFECTS OF FOOD INGREDIENTS
  • 13.4 CHALLENGES AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF FOODOMICS IN INDUSTRY
  • 13.4.1 MAJOR CHALLENGES
  • 13.4.2 POTENTIAL STRATEGIES
  • 13.5 CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • D - CONCLUSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES
  • 14 - CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF NOVEL FOODS
  • 14.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 14.2 THE EMERGENCE OF CONSUMER OPINION
  • 14.3 MAJOR THEORIES ON CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS
  • 14.4 COMMUNICATION THEORIES
  • 14.5 METHODOLOGIES TO RECORD CONSUMER OPINIONS ON NOVEL FOODS
  • 14.5.1 DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  • 14.5.2 MEASURES RELATED TO CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF NOVEL FOODS
  • 14.6 CRITICAL NOTES ON THEORIES AND MEASUREMENTS AND NOTABLE IDEAS FOR THE FUTURE
  • 14.6.1 CRITICAL NOTES ON CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND COMMUNICATION THEORIES
  • 14.6.2 ALTERNATIVE CONSIDERATIONS FOR CONSUMER SCIENCE RESEARCH
  • 14.6.3 CRITICAL NOTES ON, AND DEVELOPMENT OF, MEASUREMENTS
  • 14.7 CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION
  • REFERENCES
  • 15 - CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
  • 15.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 15.2 INNOVATION STRATEGIES AND LONG-TERM R&D FOR THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 15.3 DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIONS IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY
  • 15.4 CUTTING-EDGE INNOVATION AREAS IN FOOD SCIENCE
  • 15.4.1 FUNCTIONAL FOODS
  • 15.4.2 FOODOMICS
  • 15.4.3 FOOD WASTE RECOVERY
  • 15.4.4 BIOBASED MATERIALS FOR SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING
  • 15.4.5 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES
  • 15.5 CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE, AND CHAPTER CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • Z
  • Back Cover

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