African Health Leaders: Making Change and Claiming the Future

Making Change and Claiming the Future
 
 
OUP Oxford (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 23. August 2014
  • |
  • 310 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-19-100840-5 (ISBN)
 
Most accounts of health and healthcare in Africa are written by foreigners. African Health Leaders: Making Change and Claiming the Future redresses the balance. Written by Africans, who have themselves led improvements in their own countries, the book discusses the creativity, innovation and leadership that has been involved tackling everything from HIV/AIDs, to maternal, and child mortality and neglected tropical diseases. It celebrates their achievementsand shows how, over three generations, African health leaders are creating a distinctively African vision of health and health systems. The book reveals how African Health Leaders are claiming the future - in Africa, but also by sharing their insights and knowledge globally and contributing fully to improving health throughout the world. It illustrates how African leadership can enable foreign agencies and individuals working in Africa to avoid all those misunderstandings and misinterpretations of culture and context which lead to wasted efforts and frustrated hopes. African Health Leaders challenges Africans to do more for themselves, build on success, tackle weak governance, corrupt systems and low expectations and claim the future. It sets out what Africa needs from the rest of the world in the spirit of global solidarity - not primarily in aid, but through investment, collaboration, partnership and co-development. It concludes with a vision for improvement based on three foundations: an understanding that 'health is made at home', thedetermination to offer access to health services for everyone, and an insistence on the pursuit of quality.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
978-0-19-100840-5 (9780191008405)
0191008400 (0191008400)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Foreword: Her Excellency Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma
  • Foreword: Dr Judith Roddin, Dr Mark Britnell, and Dr Paul Fife
  • Contents
  • Abbreviations
  • Contributors
  • Part 1: Overview of African health leaders
  • Chapter 1. Introduction to Part 1: Overview
  • A celebration of the past and a vision for the future
  • The structure of the book
  • The authors
  • The editors
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Health leadership in Africa
  • Health leadership in Africa in context
  • Leadership, governance, and management for health in Africa
  • The African Union
  • National governments
  • Partnerships for health development
  • Africans on the world stage
  • Individuals, families, and communities
  • The future
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Part 2: The greatest challenges
  • Chapter 3. Introduction to Part 2: The greatest challenges
  • The greatest challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Pioneering work on HIV/AIDS in Uganda
  • Slim disease: a new disease in Uganda
  • Tackling the epidemic: the first stages
  • The Uganda success in prevention
  • The treatment breakthrough-but not for Africa
  • Building capacity
  • International response
  • Global AIDS fund (GAF)
  • President's emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR)
  • The future
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Mobilizing the community against maternal death-the Malawi community champion model
  • Maternal mortality in Malawi
  • Healthcare infrastructure
  • Clinical strategies for tackling maternal mortality
  • Healthcare workforce shortages
  • Customs, social mores, and habits influencing heathcare-seeking behaviour and attitude to Western medicine
  • The role of traditional and opinion leaders in influencing behaviour in Africans, especially in rural areas
  • Community interventions
  • Training and support to traditional leaders
  • Community mobilization
  • Problems encountered
  • Way forward
  • Key considerations for processes and policies: building consensus at the country level
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Epidemiology and health policy in Africa
  • The WHO African region
  • Health systems
  • Healthcare delivery
  • Universal health coverage
  • Health status
  • Life expectancy
  • Mortality
  • Burden of disease
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Tuberculosis
  • Malaria and neglected tropical diseases
  • Vaccine-preventable diseases
  • Non-communicable diseases
  • Epidemics and pandemics
  • Traumas, injuries, and violence
  • Maternal health
  • Neonatal and child health
  • Health determinants and risk factors
  • Health determinants
  • Risk factors for health
  • Emergencies and disasters
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 3: All the resources of the community
  • Chapter 7. Introduction to Part 3: All the resources of the community
  • Ubuntu
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Community health, community workers, and community governance
  • Introduction to the importance of the community
  • Factors that support the community approach to healthcare
  • The health workforce at the community level
  • Kenya's four-cadre community health workforce
  • Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs)
  • Community Health Volunteers (CHVs)
  • Community Health Midwives (CHMWs)
  • Governance structure: Community Health Committees (CHC)
  • Strategic links to the health system as a whole
  • Leadership and governance nationally and locally
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9. The development of community directed treatment for tackling river blindness
  • The scourge of river blindness
  • The solution: the development of CDTI
  • CDTI development: the power of investing in research
  • The results: the CDTI success story
  • Lessons learnt: CDTI in practice
  • challenges and opportunities
  • Implementing and scaling-up of CDTI in countries
  • Problems in the development of CDTI
  • Implementing and managing CDTI in conflict countries
  • Motivation and cash incentives
  • The challenge of engaging women distributors
  • Breaking the barriers: CDTI as a vehicle for other health interventions
  • The Role for CDTI in weak health systems in Africa
  • An unusual voice in international partnership
  • How to achieve success in community-based programmes
  • Conclusion
  • Lessons
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Politics, economics, and society
  • The African Union
  • Socio-economic and political context
  • Governance
  • Specific issues
  • Multi-sectoral approaches
  • Vertical programming and disease-specific interventions
  • Human resources for health
  • Access to medicines
  • Financing and sustainability
  • Implementation challenges
  • The African Union response to these issues
  • Technical consultative meetings
  • Special/extra-ordinary summits
  • Ministerial meetings
  • Special sessions
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 4: Making the best use of all the talents
  • Chapter 11. Introduction to Part 4: Making the best use of all the talents
  • Health workers: the scarcest resource
  • Migration
  • Skill mix change or task-shifting
  • Nursing
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Tecnicos de cirurgia-assistant medical officers trained for surgery in Mozambique
  • Exodus of the doctors
  • Implementing the policy
  • Impact-the backbone of emergency surgical care for most of the country
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13. All the skills of the health team
  • Eye health in The Gambia
  • My personal paradigm shift
  • The national eye care programme
  • Alignment with the government commitment to primary care
  • Rural communities
  • Developing human resources
  • Expanding the programme
  • Influencing healthcare and human resources in West Africa
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14. The evolution of professional education and health systems in sub-Saharan Africa
  • Professional education and health services
  • From health auxiliary to medical doctor in Cameroon
  • The development of health training institutions
  • Working together across Africa
  • Looking to the future with international cooperation
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Indigenous knowledge systems
  • Knowledge systems around the world
  • Knowledge and technology sharing
  • The future-creating new structures and new disciplines
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 5: Health for the whole population-leaving no-one behind
  • Chapter 16. Introduction to Part 5: Health for the whole population-leaving no-one behind
  • Leaving no one behind
  • The global context
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Twenty years of improving access to healthcare in Rwanda
  • Healthcare as part of the wider recovery and development of the country
  • Geographic equity
  • Financial equity
  • Right to information
  • Holistic approach to health services
  • Results
  • The future
  • References
  • Chapter 18. HIV/AIDS and National Health Insurance in South Africa
  • Tackling HIV/AIDS
  • Does HIV cause AIDS?
  • NHI-a national triumph or a disaster?
  • Human resources and leadership
  • Lord Crisp writes
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Coverage of the poor-innovative health financing in Ghana
  • National health insurance in Ghana
  • Implementation, financing, and sustainability
  • Measures to provide cover for the poor
  • The current status of NHIS
  • Conclusions: the way forward
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Health for the whole population
  • Family, customs, and history
  • Effect of new world economic pressures on African social values and health systems-and public policy responses
  • Emerging concerns with inequality in health outcomes
  • 'Health from the womb to the tomb'
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Part 6: The future
  • Chapter 21. Introduction to Part 6: The future
  • Turning to the future
  • Chapter 22. The future: view from a Minister
  • The state of health and healthcare in Africa today
  • The encouraging trends for the future . and the worrying ones
  • My greatest hopes and fears for the future
  • My vision for health in Sierra Leone
  • Chapter 23. The future: younger and future leaders
  • What do you see as the key features of health and healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa today?
  • Health workers
  • Wider economic, social, and political perspectives and the determinants of health
  • What are the encouraging signs of improvement and the trends that need to be supported?
  • The situation in Botswana
  • Cameroon
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • What are the worrying signs and concerns about the future?
  • Politics, inequality, and accountability
  • What is your vision and your hope for the future?
  • Chapter 24. The future: vision and challenges
  • The major themes
  • Health is made at home
  • Health systems
  • Human resources
  • Science and technology
  • Governance
  • The future
  • Creating change and claiming the future-what Africans should be doing for ourselves
  • Global solidarity-what Africa needs from the rest of the world
  • The vision for health and health services in Africa-and its contribution to improving health globally
  • Final words from the editors
  • References
  • Appendix 1: Africans on the world stage
  • Other great African health leaders
  • Dr Anarfi Asamoa-Baah-Deputy Director-General, WHO (2007 to date)
  • Professor Adetokunbo Lucas, Founding Director of the Division for Tropical Disease Research Programme (TDR), WHO
  • Mrs Daisy Mafubelu, Former Assistant Director-General WHO (2007-10)
  • Dr Margaret Mungerera, President World Medical Association (2013-14)
  • Dr Faoumata Nafo-Traoré, Executive Director of Roll Back Malaria (RBM) (2010 to date)
  • Dr Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations' Population Fund (2011 to date)
  • Joy Phumaphi, Vice President of the World Bank (2007-09) and Assistant Director-General of WHO (2003-07)
  • Dr Comlan Alfred A. Quenum, Regional Director WHO (1965-84)
  • Dr Ebrahim Malick Samba, Regional Director WHO (1995-2005)
  • Michel Sidibé, UNAIDS Deputy Executive Director (2009 to date)
  • Dr Francisco Songane, Director of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (2004-09)
  • Index

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