Rhetoric and Religious Identity in Late Antiquity

 
 
Oxford University Press
  • erschienen am 31. August 2020
  • |
  • 304 Seiten
 
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978-0-19-254266-3 (ISBN)
 
The topic of religious identity in late antiquity is highly contentious. How did individuals and groups come to ascribe identities based on what would now be known as 'religion', categorizing themselves and others with regard to Judaism, Manichaeism, traditional Greek and Roman practices, and numerous competing conceptions of Christianity? How and why did examples of self-identification become established, activated, or transformed in response to circumstances? To what extent do labels (whether ancient and modern) for religious categories reflect a sense of a unified and enduring social or group identity for those included within them? How does religious identity relate to other forms of ancient identity politics (for example, ethnic discourse concerning 'barbarians')? Rhetoric and Religious Identity in Late Antiquity responds to the recent upsurge of interest in this issue by developing interdisciplinary research between classics, ancient and medieval history, philosophy, religion, patristics, and Byzantine studies, expanding the range of evidence standardly used to explore these questions. In exploring the malleability and potential overlapping of religious identities in late antiquity, as well as their variable expressions in response to different public and private contexts, it challenges some prominent scholarly paradigms. In particular, rhetoric and religious identity are here brought together and simultaneously interrogated to provide mutual illumination: in what way does a better understanding of rhetoric (its rules, forms, practices) enrich our understanding of the expression of late-antique religious identity? How does an understanding of how religious identity was ascribed, constructed, and contested provide us with a new perspective on rhetoric at work in late antiquity?
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 2,41 MB
978-0-19-254266-3 (9780192542663)
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Prof Richard Flower studied for his BA, MPhil and PhD in Classics at Clare College, Cambridge, and has worked at the Universities of Cambridge, Sheffield and Exeter. He specialises in the construction of imperial and ecclesiastical authority, particularly in late-antique polemical literature and heresiology. His publications include Emperors and Bishops in Late Roman Invective (Cambridge, 2013) and Imperial Invectives against Constantius II (Liverpool, 2016), and he is also editing The Cambridge Companion to Christian Heresy. Prof Morwenna Ludlow studied Classics and then Theology at the University of Oxford. She has written widely on Gregory of Nyssa. Her latest book, Art, Craft and Theology in Fourth Century Greek Authors (also published by OUP) examines the use of literary and rhetorical tropes by Christian authors and argues that they interpret themselves as both theologians and craftsmen with words.
  • Cover
  • Rhetoric and Religious Identity in Late Antiquity
  • Copyright
  • Acknowledgements
  • Contents
  • List of Illustrations
  • List of Contributors
  • 1: Rhetoric and Religious Identity in Late Antiquity
  • Part I: The Nature of Religious Identities and Their Representation
  • 2: Approaching 'Religious Identity' in Late Antiquity
  • INTRODUCTION
  • ENOUGH WITH THE SEMI-CHRISTIANS
  • From Guignebert (1923) to Bonner (1984)
  • Semi-Christians, Judeo-Christians, or Judaizers?
  • The Kahlos Scheme
  • A NEW APPROACH TO RELIGIOUS IDENTITYIN LATE ANTIQUITY
  • The Danger of 'Groupism'
  • Individuals and Their Many Identities
  • CONCLUSION
  • 3: The Rhetoric of Pagan Religious Identities: Porphyry and his First Readers
  • ETHNICITY AND RELIGION
  • RELIGIOUS IDENTITIES
  • CONCLUSION
  • 4: The Maccabees, 'Apostasy', and Julian's Appropriation of Hellenismos as a Reclaimed Epithet in Christian Conversations of the Fourth Century CE
  • INTRODUCTION: THE REASONS FOR METHODOLOGICAL RIGOUR
  • JULIAN AS A CASE STUDY IN HOW TO APPLY HISTORICAL METHOD
  • Overview of the Problem: Julian's Hellenismos
  • HELLENISTIC JUDAISM, INTRA-GROUP USES OF HELLENISMOS, AND JULIAN
  • Julian's Letter to Arsacius, 362 CE
  • From the Maccabees to Julian: Hellenismos as a Negative In-Group Word
  • RECLAIMED EPITHETS AND INTERNAL IDENTITY DISPUTES AS SUBJECTS OF SOCIAL HISTORY
  • Theories of Linguistic Reclamation
  • SITUATING MINORITY IDENTITY DISPUTES IN A NON-MINORITY CULTURAL FRAMEWORK ( 'THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY' )
  • CONCLUSION
  • Part II: Agents of the Representation of Religious Identity
  • 5: Julian the Apologist: Christians and Pagans on the Mother of the Gods
  • INTRODUCTION
  • LATE EVIDENCE, CHRISTIAN EVIDENCE
  • ARNOBIUS
  • FIRMICUS MATERNUS
  • JULIAN
  • JULIAN THE APOLOGIST
  • CONCLUSION
  • 6: Bodies, Books, Histories: Augustine of Hippo and the Extraordinary (civ. Dei 16.8 and Pliny, HN 7)
  • HISTORY AND BOOKS
  • HISTORY AS BODY
  • EXTRAORDINARY BODIES-PLINY AND HIS APE
  • BODIES OF EXTRAORDINARY KNOWLEDGE
  • 7: Classical Decadence or Christian Aesthetics?: Libanius, John Chrysostom, and Augustine on Rhetoric
  • 8: 'Very great are your words': Dialogue as Rhetoric in Manichaean Kephalaia
  • INTRODUCTION
  • 9: 'A Christian cannot employ magic': Rhetorical Self-fashioning of the Magicless Christianity of Late Antiquity
  • 'A CHRISTIAN CANNOT EMPLOY MAGIC'
  • CHRISTIAN SELF-FASHIONING IN RHETORIC: A MAGICLESS SELF-IMAGE
  • THE SIGN OF CHRIST OR THE SIGN OF THE DEVIL
  • RIVALRY BETWEEN RITUAL EXPERTS
  • APORIA AND AUTHORITY
  • THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING MAGICLESS
  • CONCLUSION
  • Part III: Modes of the Representation of Religious Identity
  • 10: The Rhetorical Construction of a Christian Empire in the Theodosian Code
  • INTRODUCTION
  • Christiana Res Publica: From Constantine to Theodosius II
  • EDITORIAL PROCESSES AND THEODOSIAN CHRISTIANITY
  • Selection and Omission
  • Beyond Constantine: Presenting Theodosian Christianity
  • CONCLUSION: ROMAN LAW FOR A CHRISTIAN EMPIRE
  • 11: What Happened after Eusebius? Chronicles and Narrative Identities in the Fourth Century
  • FROM EUSEBIUS TO ANNIANUS
  • CHRISTIAN IDENTITY IN THE SLIPSTREAM OF EUSEBIUS
  • INSTITUTIONAL AND NATURAL IDENTITY
  • THE CENTRE REGIONALIZED: ANNIANUS
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • APPENDIX
  • 12: The Rhetoric of Heresiological Prefaces
  • EPIPHANIUS AND THE RHETORIC OF NECESSITY
  • FILASTRIUS AND THE REFLECTION OF SCRIPTURE
  • AUGUSTINE AND THE BURDEN OF KNOWLEDGE
  • CONCLUSION
  • 13: Constructing Identity in the Tomb: The Visual Rhetoric of Early Christian Iconography
  • INTRODUCTION
  • ROMAN SARCOPHAGI
  • CHRISTIAN SARCOPHAGI
  • CHRISTIAN ICONOGRAPHIC REPERTOIRE
  • VARIOUS INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PROGRAMMES
  • PORTRAITS ON CHRISTIAN MONUMENTS
  • COMPOSITIONAL AND STYLISTIC ELEMENTS
  • CONCLUSION
  • 14: Renunciation and Ascetic Identity in the Liber ad Renatum of Asterius Ansedunensis
  • INTRODUCTION
  • ASTERII EPISCOPI ANSEDUNENSIS LIBER AD RENATUM MONACHUM
  • TRUE AND FALSE ASCETICISM IN THE LIBER AD RENATUM MONACHUM
  • ASTERIUS' CREATION NARRATIVE: EXEGESIS AND TRANSLATION IN THE SERVICE OF RENUNCIATION
  • CONCLUSION
  • 15: Christian Literary Identity and Rhetoric about Style
  • INTRODUCTION
  • KINDS OF 'STYLE' (??????????S, ?????, GENERA DICENDI)
  • Complexity
  • Three Styles (?a?a?t??e?/?d?a?/genera dicendi)
  • (i) Slender
  • (ii) Pleasant
  • (iii) Majestic or sublime
  • The Appropriate-t? p??p??
  • The Rhetorical Deployment of Literary Terms
  • THE CAPPADOCIANS: BASIL OF CAESAREA, GREGORY OF NAZIANZUS, AND GREGORY OF NYSSA
  • The Bible and Literary Style
  • (i) The 'simplicity of faith'
  • (ii) Majestic or sublime
  • (iii) Pleasant
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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