Airworthiness

An Introduction to Aircraft Certification and Operations
 
 
Butterworth-Heinemann (Verlag)
  • 3. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 12. Juli 2016
  • |
  • 552 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100940-6 (ISBN)
 

Airworthiness: An Introduction to Aircraft Certification and Operations, Third Edition, once again proves to be a valuable, user-friendly reference guide for certification engineers engaged in professional training and practical work in regulatory agencies and aircraft engineering companies. The discussions reflect the recent changes in the EASA-FAA regulations and also include the concepts of flight safety and airworthiness; the ICAO and civil aviation authorities; airworthiness requirements; type certifications and the type-certification process; production of products, parts, and appliances; certifications of airworthiness; and rules for spaceworthiness.

Since publication of the second edition, airworthiness regulation and certification around the world have gone through significant changes. For example, EASA structure has completely changed, FAA rules are no longer applicable, substantial changes have been made in the international airworthiness regulations and certification procedures, and unmanned aircraft have evolved technically and operationally. The changes in airworthiness regulations in the last five years have been striking, changing the way in which we look at airworthiness and certification processes around the world.

  • Includes updates throughout to reflect changes to the airworthiness regulations of the two most influential ruling authorities-EASA and FAA
  • Includes an update on remotely piloted air systems as well as space vehicles
  • Provides guidelines to shape a comprehensive 'certification map' including comparisons, explanations, and backgrounds of institutions and processes
  • Features a new chapter 'Certificates of Airworthiness and Permits to Fly' that provides an overall description of the requirements governing the certificates of airworthiness


Previously Director of the Italian RAI-ENAC Type Certification Division 1992-2000. Also a member of the JAA Certification Committee. As a member of the JAR 22 and JAR-VLA Study Groups since the 1970s, he had a key role in the creation and development of such standards.

Dr. De Florio has been a sailplane and aeroplane pilot for over 25 years and currently remains a member of the OSTIV Sailplane Development Panel and Honorary Member of UVS International. In June 2008, he was awarded the 1st UAS Pioneer Award instituted 'to honour and thank individuals for their exceptional and dedicated services to the international UAS community'.

  • Englisch
  • Oxford
Elsevier Science
  • 6,66 MB
978-0-08-100940-6 (9780081009406)
0081009402 (0081009402)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Airworthiness
  • Airworthiness: An Introduction to Aircraft Certification and Operations
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • About the Author
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • 1 - FLIGHT SAFETY
  • 1.1 FLIGHT SAFETY FACTORS
  • 1.1.1 THE MACHINE
  • 2 - AIRWORTHINESS
  • 2.1 DEFINITION OF AIRWORTHINESS
  • 2.2 AIRWORTHINESS IN THIS BOOK
  • 3 - THE ICAO AND THE CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITIES
  • 3.1 THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION
  • 3.1.1 THE INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS
  • 3.1.1.1 Annex 6. Operation of aircraft
  • 3.1.1.2 Annex 8. Airworthiness of aircraft
  • 3.1.1.3 Annex 13. Aircraft accident and incident investigation
  • 3.1.1.4 Annex 16. Environmental protection
  • 3.2 THE CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITIES
  • 3.2.1 ORIGINS
  • 3.3 THE JOINT AVIATION AUTHORITIES
  • 3.3.1 OBJECTIVES
  • 3.3.2 FUNCTIONS
  • 3.3.3 JOINT AVIATION AUTHORITIES TRANSITION FUNCTION
  • 3.3.4 THE JAA TRAINING ORGANISATION
  • 3.3.5 GENERAL REMARKS
  • 3.4 THE EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY
  • 3.4.1 EXECUTIVE AND REGULATORY TASKS
  • 3.4.2 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY PARTNERSHIPS
  • 3.4.3 STRUCTURE OF THE EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY
  • 3.4.4 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY BASIC REGULATIONS STRUCTURE
  • 3.5 THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
  • 3.5.1 HISTORY
  • 3.5.1.1 Origins
  • 3.5.1.2 Early responsibility
  • 3.5.1.3 The Civil Aeronautics Act
  • 3.5.1.4 The birth of the Federal Aviation Administration
  • 3.5.1.5 From agency to administration
  • 3.5.1.6 Structural changes
  • 3.5.2 FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION ACTIVITIES
  • 3.5.2.1 Safety regulations
  • 3.5.2.2 Airspace and traffic management
  • 3.5.2.3 Air navigation facilities
  • 3.5.2.4 Civil aviation abroad
  • 3.5.2.5 Commercial space transportation
  • 3.5.2.6 Research, engineering, and development
  • 3.5.2.7 Other programmes
  • 3.5.2.8 Summary of Federal Aviation Administration activities
  • 3.5.3 THE AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION SERVICE
  • 3.5.3.1 The headquarters' offices
  • 3.5.3.2 The aircraft certification directorates
  • 3.5.3.3 The field and regional offices
  • 3.5.4 THE FLIGHT STANDARD SERVICE
  • 3.5.4.1 The headquarters' offices
  • 3.5.4.2 The Flight Standards Service field offices
  • 3.6 'ONE WORLD, ONE GOAL: AVIATION SAFETY'
  • 4 - AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
  • 4.1 REQUIREMENTS, REGULATIONS, AND STANDARDS
  • 4.2 JARS, FARS, AND EASA REGULATIONS
  • 4.2.1 THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION ANNEX 8
  • 4.3 THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS
  • 4.3.1 LIST OF FARS OF TITLE 14 (CHAPTER 1) DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY RELATED TO AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION
  • 4.3.1.1 Subchapter A - definitions
  • 4.3.1.2 Subchapter B - procedural rules
  • 4.3.1.3 Subchapter C - aircraft
  • 4.3.1.4 Subchapter F - air traffic and general operating rules
  • 4.3.1.5 Subchapter G - air carriers and operators for compensation or hire: certification and operations
  • 4.3.1.6 Subchapter H - schools and other certificated agencies
  • 4.3.1.7 Historical background of FAA aircraft airworthiness regulations
  • 4.3.1.8 Advisory material
  • 4.4 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY REGULATIONS
  • 4.4.1 BASIC REGULATION
  • 4.4.1.1 Initial airworthiness
  • 4.4.1.2 Continuing airworthiness
  • 4.4.1.3 Air operations9
  • 4.4.1.4 Advisory material
  • 4.4.2 LIST OF EASA REQUIREMENTS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY RELATED TO AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION
  • 4.4.2.1 Initial airworthiness
  • 4.4.2.2 Continuing airworthiness
  • 4.4.2.3 Air operations
  • 4.5 GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON AIRWORTHINESS REGULATIONS
  • 4.5.1 PUBLICATION
  • 4.5.1.1 Federal Aviation Administration
  • 4.5.1.2 European Aviation Safety Agency
  • 4.5.2 SEVERITY OF AIRWORTHINESS STANDARD
  • 4.5.3 'PHILOSOPHIES' OF AIRWORTHINESS STANDARD
  • 4.5.3.1 Special conditions
  • 4.5.3.2 Stalling speed for single-engine aeroplanes
  • 4.5.3.3 Crashworthiness
  • 4.5.3.4 Fire protection
  • 4.5.3.5 Safety assessment
  • 4.5.3.5.1 The failure conditions
  • 4.5.3.5.2 Quantitative probability terms
  • 4.5.3.6 Fatigue strength
  • 4.5.3.7 Icing protection
  • 4.5.3.7.1 The freezing rain
  • 4.5.3.7.2 The airworthiness regulations (aeroplanes)
  • 4.5.3.7.3 Appendix C
  • 4.5.3.7.4 The current FAA/EASA airworthiness regulations (transport category aeroplanes)
  • 4.5.3.7.5 FAR/CS 23 aeroplanes
  • 4.5.3.7.6 A personal experience
  • 4.5.4 FAR 21/EASA PART 21
  • 4.5.4.1 FAR21 - certification procedures for products and parts
  • 4.5.4.2 EASA Part 21 - certification of aircraft and related products, parts, and appliances, and of design and production organ...
  • Section B of Part 21 contains the Procedures for Competent Authorities
  • 4.5.5 STRUCTURE OF AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS
  • 4.5.6 AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS APPLICABILITY
  • 4.5.6.1 CS-22: sailplanes and powered sailplanes
  • 4.5.6.2 CS-VLA: very light aeroplanes
  • 4.5.6.3 FAR/CS-23: normal, utility, acrobatic, and commuters aeroplanes
  • 4.5.6.4 FAR/CS-25: transport category/large/aeroplanes
  • 4.5.6.5 FAR/CS-27: normal category/small/rotorcraft
  • 4.5.6.6 FAR/CS-29: transport category/large/rotorcraft
  • 4.5.6.7 CS-VLR: very light rotorcraft
  • 4.5.6.8 FAR/CS-31 HB: manned free/hot air/balloons
  • 4.5.6.9 FAR/CS-34: fuel venting and Exhaust Emission Requirements for turbine Engine-Powered Aeroplanes/Aircraft Engine Emission...
  • 4.5.6.10 FAR/CS-36: noise standards: aircraft type and airworthiness certification/Aircraft Noise
  • 4.5.6.11 CS-APU: auxiliary power units
  • 5 - TYPE CERTIFICATION
  • 5.1 THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION TYPE CERTIFICATION
  • 5.2 TYPE CERTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT, ENGINES, AND PROPELLERS
  • 5.2.1 THE TYPE CERTIFICATE
  • 5.2.1.1 Content of the type certificate
  • 5.2.1.2 Duration and continued validity
  • 5.2.1.3 Transfer of a type certificate
  • 5.2.1.4 'Orphan' aircraft
  • 5.2.1.5 European Aviation Safety Agency Part 21 type certificates
  • 5.2.1.6 Federal Aviation Regulations 21 type certificates
  • 5.2.1.7 Instruction for continued airworthiness
  • 5.2.2 THE TYPE DESIGN
  • 5.2.3 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
  • 5.2.3.1 Designation of applicable environmental protection requirements
  • 5.2.3.2 A look into the future
  • 5.2.4 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY DESIGN ORGANISATION
  • 5.2.4.1 Demonstration of capability
  • 5.2.4.2 Alternative procedure
  • 5.2.4.3 Design organisation approval European Aviation Safety Agency
  • 5.2.5 CHANGES IN TYPE DESIGN
  • 5.2.5.1 Classification of changes
  • 5.2.5.2 The type certification basis for a type certificate
  • 5.2.5.3 Designation of the type certification basis for changes to type certificate
  • 5.2.5.4 Advisory material
  • 5.2.6 THE SUPPLEMENTAL TYPE CERTIFICATE
  • 5.2.6.1 The European Aviation Safety Agency supplemental type certificates
  • 5.2.6.2 The Federal Aviation Administration supplemental type certificates
  • 5.2.6.3 Notes about supplemental type certificates
  • 5.2.6.4 Advisory material
  • 5.3 APPROVAL OF PARTS AND APPLIANCES
  • 5.3.1 FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION APPROVAL OF ARTICLES
  • 5.3.1.1 Parts manufacturer approvals
  • 5.3.1.2 Technical Standard Order approvals
  • 5.3.1.3 Approvals in conjunction with type certification procedures for a product or in any other manner approved by the Federal...
  • 5.3.2 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY PARTS AND APPLIANCES APPROVAL
  • 5.3.2.1 Approval in conjunction with the type certification procedures for a product
  • 5.3.2.2 European Technical Standard Order authorisation
  • 5.3.2.3 Approval in the case of standard parts
  • 5.3.2.4 Miscellaneous
  • 5.3.2.4.1 No Hazard Criteria
  • 5.3.2.4.2 Owner-Produced Parts
  • 5.4 TYPE CERTIFICATION OF IMPORTED PRODUCTS AND ARTICLES
  • 5.4.1 THE US/EU AGREEMENT
  • 5.4.1.1 The annexes
  • 5.4.1.2 The technical implementation procedures for airworthiness and environmental certification
  • 5.4.2 FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION CERTIFICATION OF IMPORTED PRODUCTS AND ARTICLES
  • 5.4.2.1 Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement
  • 5.4.2.2 Certification basis
  • 5.4.3 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY CERTIFICATION OF IMPORTED PRODUCTS AND ARTICLES
  • 5.4.3.1 European Union bilateral agreements
  • 5.4.3.2 European Aviation Safety Agency working arrangements
  • 6 - THE TYPE CERTIFICATION PROCESS
  • 6.1 THE ICAO PROCEDURES FOR TYPE CERTIFICATION
  • 6.2 THE EASA TYPE CERTIFICATION PROCESS
  • 6.2.1 SUMMARY OF THE TYPE CERTIFICATION PROCESS
  • 6.2.2 THE REQUIREMENTS
  • 6.2.3 THE TYPE CERTIFICATION PROCEDURE
  • 6.2.3.1 Basic principles
  • 6.2.3.2 Details of the procedure
  • 6.3 THE FAA TYPE CERTIFICATION PROCESS
  • 6.3.1 INTRODUCTION
  • 6.3.2 DESIGNATED ENGINEERING REPRESENTATIVES
  • 6.3.2.1 Company-designated engineering representatives
  • 6.3.2.2 Consultant-designated engineering representative
  • 6.3.2.3 The designated engineering representative's designation
  • 6.3.2.4 Designated engineering representative special delegations/authorisations
  • 6.3.3 GUIDANCE MATERIAL
  • 6.3.3.1 The FAA and Industry Guide to Product Certification
  • 6.3.3.1.1 Partnership for Safety Plan
  • 6.3.3.1.2 Project-Specific Certification Plan
  • 6.3.3.1.3 Phases of Type Certification
  • 6.3.3.1.4 The Key Players of the Type Certification Process
  • 6.3.3.2 FAA Order 8110.4 C, type certification
  • 6.3.3.2.1 General
  • 6.3.3.2.2 Overview of a Typical Type Certification Process
  • 6.3.3.3 List of FAA Advisory Circulars (AC) relevant to type certification
  • 6.3.4 CONSTRUCTION OF PROTOTYPES AND TEST ARTICLES
  • 7 - PRODUCTION OF PRODUCTS, PARTS, AND APPLIANCES
  • 7.1 THE EASA PRODUCTION ORGANISATION
  • 7.1.1 PRODUCTION ORGANISATION APPROVAL
  • 7.1.1.1 Scope and eligibility
  • 7.1.1.2 Application
  • 7.1.1.3 Quality system
  • 7.1.1.4 Exposition
  • 7.1.1.5 Approval requirements
  • 7.1.1.6 Privileges
  • 7.1.1.7 Obligations of the holder
  • 7.1.1.8 Procedures for competent authorities
  • 7.1.1.9 The EASA user guide
  • 7.1.1.9.1 Application
  • 7.1.1.9.2 Determination of the production organization approval team
  • 7.1.1.9.3 Certification procedures
  • 7.1.1.9.4 Recommendation
  • 7.1.1.9.5 Issuance of an approval certificate
  • 7.1.1.9.6 Continued surveillance
  • 7.1.2 PRODUCTION WITHOUT PRODUCTION ORGANISATION APPROVAL
  • 7.1.2.1 Scope and eligibility
  • 7.1.2.2 Application and letters of agreement
  • 7.1.2.3 The production inspection system
  • 7.1.2.4 Obligations of the manufacturer and statement of conformity
  • 7.1.2.5 Procedures for competent authorities
  • 7.2 THE FAA PRODUCTION APPROVAL
  • 7.2.1 PRODUCTION CERTIFICATES
  • 7.2.1.1 Applicability and eligibility
  • 7.2.1.2 Organisation and quality system
  • 7.2.1.3 Issuance and privilege of PC
  • 7.2.1.4 Responsibility of holder
  • 7.2.2 PRODUCTION UNDER TYPE CERTIFICATES
  • 7.2.2.1 Applicability and discussion
  • 7.2.2.2 Privileges
  • 7.2.2.3 Inspections and tests
  • 7.2.2.4 Location of or change to manufacturing facilities
  • 7.2.3 THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION STANDARDS
  • 7.2.3.1 Annex 8
  • 7.2.3.2 Airworthiness Technical Manual Doc. 9760
  • 8 - CERTIFICATES OF AIRWORTHINESS AND PERMITS TO FLY
  • 8.1 EASA CERTIFICATES OF AIRWORTHINESS AND RESTRICTED CERTIFICATES OF AIRWORTHINESS
  • 8.1.1 APPLICABILITY
  • 8.1.2 TYPE CERTIFICATE DEFINITION
  • 8.1.2.1 Part 21.A.21 type certificate
  • 8.1.2.2 Part 21.A.23 restricted type certificate
  • 8.1.3 APPLICATION (21.A.174)
  • 8.1.4 ISSUE OF AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATES
  • 8.2 EASA PERMIT TO FLY
  • 8.2.1 SCOPE
  • 8.2.2 PROCESS FOR PERMIT TO FLY
  • 8.2.2.1 The application for an EASA permit to fly
  • 8.2.2.2 The application for approval of flight conditions
  • 8.2.2.3 The approval of the flight conditions
  • 8.2.2.4 The issue of the EASA permit to fly
  • 8.2.2.5 Procedures after the first issue of permit to fly
  • 8.3 FAA AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATES
  • 8.3.1 CLASSIFICATION
  • 8.3.2 ISSUE OF STANDARD AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATES
  • 8.3.2.1 Duration
  • 8.3.3 ISSUE OF SPECIAL AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATES
  • 8.3.3.1 Special airworthiness certificates for primary category aircraft
  • 8.3.3.1.3 Duration
  • 8.3.3.1.4 General Remarks
  • 8.3.3.2 Special airworthiness certificates for restricted category aircraft
  • 8.3.3.2.1 Definition of Restricted Category Aircraft
  • 8.3.3.2.3 Duration
  • 8.3.3.3 Multiple airworthiness certification
  • 8.3.3.4 Special airworthiness certificate for limited category aircraft
  • 8.3.3.4.1 Definition of Limited Category Aircraft (FAR 21.189)
  • 8.3.3.4.2 Issue of an Airworthiness Certificate24
  • 8.3.3.4.3 Duration
  • 8.3.3.5 Special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft (LSA) (FAR 21.190)
  • 8.3.3.5.1 Definition of a Light-Sport Category Aircraft25
  • 8.3.3.5.2 Issue of an Airworthiness Certificate26
  • 8.3.3.5.3 Duration
  • 8.3.3.5.4 General Remarks
  • 8.3.3.5.5 Advisory Material
  • 8.3.3.6 Experimental certificates
  • 8.3.3.6.1 Definition of Experimental Category
  • 8.3.3.6.2 Issue of Experimental Certificates
  • 8.3.3.6.3 Duration
  • 8.3.3.7 Special flight permits
  • 8.3.3.7.1 Definition of Special Flight Permit
  • 8.3.3.7.2 Issue of Special Flight Permits
  • 8.3.3.8 Provisional airworthiness certificate
  • 8.3.3.8.1 Definition of Provisional TC
  • 8.3.3.8.2 Definition of Provisional Airworthiness Certificates
  • 8.3.3.8.3 General Remarks
  • 8.3.4 EXPORT AIRWORTHINESS APPROVALS
  • 8.3.4.1 Types of export airworthiness approvals (from AC No. 21-44)
  • 8.3.4.2 Requirements to be met before the FAA issues an export C of A for a new or used aircraft
  • 8.3.4.3 Exporting an aircraft to a country or jurisdiction that does not have a bilateral agreement with the United States
  • 8.3.4.4 Requirements to be met before the FAA issues an export airworthiness approval for a new or used aircraft engine, propell...
  • 8.3.4.5 Exporting an aircraft engine, propeller, or article to a country or jurisdiction that does not have a bilateral agreemen...
  • 8.3.4.6 General remarks on export airworthiness approvals
  • 9 - AIR OPERATIONS REGULATIONS
  • 9.1 INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION OPERATIONAL STANDARDS
  • 9.2 FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONAL STANDARDS
  • 9.2.1 DEFINITIONS (FROM FAR 1 AND FAR 119)
  • 9.2.1.1 General
  • 9.2.1.2 Kind of operation
  • 9.2.1.3 Locations
  • 9.2.2 APPLICABILITY OF FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS OPERATIONAL STANDARDS
  • 9.2.2.1 FAR 91. General operating and flight rules
  • 9.2.2.2 FAR 121. Operating requirements: domestic, flag, and supplemental operations
  • 9.2.2.4 FAR 129. Operations: foreign air carriers and foreign operators of US-registered aircraft engaged in common carriage
  • 9.2.2.5 FAR 135. Operating requirements: commuter and on-demand operations and rules governing persons on board such aircraft
  • 9.2.2.6 FAR 137. Agricultural aircraft operations
  • 9.3 EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY OPERATIONAL STANDARDS
  • 9.3.1 AIR OPERATIONS REGULATIONS
  • 9.3.2 OPERATOR CLASSIFICATION
  • 9.3.3 ANNEXES OF THE REGULATION ON AIR OPERATIONS
  • 9.3.4 APPLICABILITY OF THE ANNEXES
  • 9.3.4.1 Annex II: Part-ARO
  • 9.3.4.1.1 Authority Requirements for Air Operations
  • 9.3.4.2 Annex III: Part-ORO
  • 9.3.4.2.1 Organisation Requirements for Air Operations
  • 9.3.4.3 Annex IV: Part-CAT
  • 9.3.4.3.1 Commercial Air Transport Operations
  • 9.3.4.4 Annex V: Part-SPA
  • 9.3.4.4.1 Specific Approvals
  • 9.3.4.5 Annex VI: Part-NCC
  • 9.3.4.5.1 Non-Commercial Air Operations With Complex Motor-Powered Aircraft
  • 9.3.4.6 Annex VII: Part-NCO
  • 9.3.4.6.1 Noncommercial Air Operations With Other-Than-Complex Motor-Powered Aircraft
  • 9.3.4.7 Annex VIII: Part-SPO
  • 9.3.4.7.1 Specialised operations
  • 9.4 ADDITIONAL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS FOR OPERATION
  • 9.4.1 GENERAL
  • 9.4.2 FAA ADDITIONAL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS FOR OPERATIONS
  • 9.4.3 THE EUROPEAN AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY ADDITIONAL AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS FOR OPERATIONS
  • 9.4.3.1 Part 26 additional airworthiness specifications for operations
  • 10 - CONTINUING1 AIRWORTHINESS AND AIR OPERATOR'S CERTIFICATION
  • 10.1 FAA MAINTENANCE/CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS
  • 10.1.1 FAR 91 - GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES
  • 10.1.1.1 Subpart E - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations
  • 10.1.1.2 Subpart K - Fractional ownership operations
  • 10.1.1.3 Subpart L - Continued airworthiness and safety improvement
  • 10.1.2 FAR 43. MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATIONS
  • 10.1.3 FAR 121. OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS
  • 10.1.3.1 Subpart L - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations
  • 10.1.3.2 Subpart V - Records and reports
  • 10.1.3.3 Subpart AA - Continued airworthiness and safety improvements
  • 10.1.4 FAR 125 - CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING ASEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUMPAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6000 POUNDS OR MORE
  • AND RULES GOVERNINGPERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT
  • 10.1.4.1 Subpart C - Manual requirements
  • 10.1.4.2 Subpart G - Maintenance
  • 10.1.4.3 Subpart L - Records and reports
  • 10.1.4.4 Subpart M - Continued airworthiness and safety improvements
  • 10.1.5 FAR 129. OPERATIONS: FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE
  • 10.1.5.1 Subpart A - General
  • 10.1.5.2 Subpart B - Continued airworthiness and safety improvements
  • 10.1.6 FAR 135 - OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT
  • 10.1.6.1 Subpart J - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations
  • 10.1.7 FAR 145 - REPAIR STATIONS
  • 10.1.7.1 Subpart A - General
  • 10.1.7.2 Subpart B - Certification
  • 10.1.7.3 Subpart C - Housing, facilities, equipment, materials, and data
  • 10.1.7.4 Subpart D - Personnel
  • 10.1.7.5 Subpart E - Operating rules
  • 10.1.8 FAR 65. CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS
  • 10.1.8.1 Subpart A - General
  • 10.1.8.2 Subpart D - Mechanics
  • 10.1.8.3 Subpart E - Repairmen
  • 10.1.8.4 Subpart F - Parachute riggers
  • 10.1.9 FAR 147 - AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS
  • 10.1.9.1 Subpart A - General
  • 10.1.9.2 Subpart B - Certification requirements
  • 10.1.9.3 Subpart C - Operating rules
  • 10.1.10 FAA REPAIRS
  • 10.1.10.1 FAR 43 Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, Rebuilding, and Alteration
  • 10.1.10.2 FAR 145 - Repair stations
  • 10.2 EASA MAINTENANCE/CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS
  • 10.2.1 ANNEX I (PART M)
  • 10.2.2 ANNEX II (PART-145)
  • 10.2.3 ANNEX III (PART 66)
  • 10.2.4 ANNEX IV (PART 147)
  • 10.2.5 EASA REPAIRS
  • 10.2.5.1 General
  • 10.2.5.2 Standard repair
  • 10.2.5.3 Classification of repairs
  • 10.2.5.4 Demonstration of capability
  • 10.2.5.5 Issue of repair design approval
  • 10.2.5.6 Repair embodiment
  • 10.2.5.7 Instructions for continued airworthiness
  • 10.3 AGEING AIRCRAFT
  • 10.3.1 GENERAL
  • 10.3.2 FAA REQUIREMENTS
  • 10.3.2.1 Background
  • 10.3.2.3 FAR sections concerned
  • 10.3.3 EASA REQUIREMENTS
  • 10.3.3.1 The AMC 20-20 'continuing structural integrity program'
  • 10.3.3.2 The NPA 2013-07 of 23 April 2013
  • 10.4 AIR OPERATORS' CERTIFICATION
  • 10.4.1 ICAO AIR OPERATORS CERTIFICATE
  • 10.4.2 FAA AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS' CERTIFICATION
  • 10.4.2.1 FAR 119-certification: air carriers and commercial operators
  • 10.4.2.2 Fractional ownership
  • 10.4.2.3 Operations not involving common carriage
  • 10.4.3 EASA AIR OPERATORS' CERTIFICATION
  • 10.4.3.1 General
  • 10.4.3.2 Air operator certificate
  • 10.4.3.3 Competent authority requirements
  • 10.5 EXTENDED OPERATIONS
  • 10.5.1 FAR 121 ETOPS
  • 10.5.1.1 General
  • 10.5.1.2 Applicable regulations
  • 10.5.1.3 Background on ETOPS
  • 10.5.1.4 Preclude and protect
  • 10.5.1.5 ETOPS areas of operation
  • 10.5.1.6 ETOPS in-service experience requirements
  • 10.5.1.7 Operational reliability and systems suitability requirements
  • 10.5.1.8 Requirements for ETOPS authorisation
  • 10.5.1.9 Maintenance requirements for two-engine ETOPS authorisation
  • 10.5.1.10 ETOPS maintenance training requirements
  • 10.5.1.11 ETOPS flight operations requirements
  • 10.5.1.12 Flight operations training requirements
  • 10.5.2 APPLICATIONS AND APPROVAL OF FAR 121 ETOPS
  • 10.5.2.1 ETOPS qualifications
  • 10.5.2.2 Application and issue of ETOPS authorisation
  • 10.5.2.2.1 Two-Engine Airplanes
  • 10.5.2.2.2 Passenger-Carrying Airplanes With More Than Two Engines
  • 10.5.2.3 Validation flight(s)
  • 10.5.2.4 ETOPS OpsSpecs
  • 10.5.2.5 Processes after receiving ETOPS authority
  • 10.5.3 POLAR OPERATIONS
  • 10.5.3.1 Definition
  • 10.5.3.2 Applicability
  • 10.5.3.3 Polar requirements
  • 10.5.4 APPENDICES TO THE AC 120-42 B
  • 10.5.5 FAR 135 ETOPS
  • 10.5.5.1 General
  • 10.5.5.2 ETOPS regulatory requirements
  • 10.5.5.3 ETOPS applicability to FAR 135 long-range operations
  • 10.5.5.4 ETOPS areas of operations
  • 10.5.5.5 Notes
  • 10.5.5.6 Appendices
  • 10.5.6 EASA ETOPS
  • 10.5.6.1 General
  • 10.5.6.2 ETOPS regulatory requirements
  • 10.5.6.3 Advisory material
  • 10.6 AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES
  • 10.6.1 GENERAL
  • 10.6.1.1 Responsibilities of contracting states in respect of continuing airworthiness
  • 10.6.2 FAA ADS
  • 10.6.2.1 The FAR 39
  • 10.6.2.2 The Airworthiness Directives Manual
  • 10.6.3 EASA ADS
  • 10.6.3.1 Part 21.A.3B airworthiness directives
  • 10.6.3.2 Advisory material
  • 10.6.3.3 EASA airworthiness directives policy
  • 10.7 THE MASTER MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST/MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST
  • 10.7.1 GENERAL
  • 10.7.2 EASA MMEL/MEL
  • 10.7.2.1 The CS MMEL
  • 10.7.2.2 The air operations regulations
  • 10.7.3 FAA MMEL/MEL
  • 10.7.3.1 The air operations regulations
  • 10.8 SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF FOREIGN AIRCRAFT
  • 10.8.1 GENERAL
  • 10.8.2 EASA RAMP INSPECTION PROGRAM (SAFA/SACA)
  • 10.8.2.1 The Commission Regulation (EU) No 965/2012
  • 10.8.2.2 Ramp Inspection Programme (SAFA/SACA)
  • 10.8.3 FAA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION SAFETY ASSESSMENT (IASA) PROGRAM
  • 10.8.3.1 General
  • 10.8.3.2 The IASA Program
  • 10.8.3.3 The IASA Process
  • 10.9 SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
  • 10.9.1 GENERAL
  • 10.9.2 SAFETY MANAGEMENT FUNDAMENTALS
  • 10.9.2.1 The concept of safety
  • 10.9.2.2 The evolution of safety
  • 10.9.2.3 Accident causation
  • 10.9.2.4 Safety culture
  • 10.9.2.5 The safety management
  • 10.9.2.6 Safety reporting and investigation
  • 10.9.2.7 Hazards
  • 10.9.2.8 Safety risk
  • 10.9.2.9 Safety risk management
  • 10.9.3 ICAO ANNEX 19
  • 10.9.3.1 Introduction
  • 10.9.3.2 State safety management responsibilities (Chapter 3)
  • 10.9.3.3 Safety management system (SMS) (Chapter 4)
  • 10.9.3.4 Safety data collection, analysis, and exchange (Chapter 5)
  • 10.9.3.5 Appendices and attachments
  • 10.9.4 FAA SMS
  • 10.9.4.1 FAR 5 Safety Management System
  • 10.9.4.2 AC 120-92B - Safety Management Systems for Aviation Service Providers
  • 10.9.5 EASA SMS
  • 10.9.5.1 General
  • 10.9.5.2 The main elements of the EASP
  • 10.9.5.3 The requirements
  • 10.9.5.3.1 Air Crew
  • 10.9.5.3.2 Air Operations
  • 10.9.5.3.3 Continuing airworthiness
  • 10.9.5.3.4 Initial airworthiness
  • 10.9.5.3.5 ATM/ANS (Air traffic management/Air navigation services)
  • 10.9.5.3.6 Aerodromes
  • 11 - AIRWORTHINESS OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS (UAS)
  • 11.1 GENERAL
  • 11.2 AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS
  • 11.2.1 BASIC CRITERIA FOR AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS
  • 11.3 THE STATE-OF-THE-ART
  • 11.3.1 ICAO
  • 11.3.1.1 The ICAO circular 328 - unmanned aircraft systems
  • 11.3.1.1.1 Equipment
  • 11.3.1.2 The manual on remotely piloted aircraft systems
  • 11.3.2 FAA
  • 11.3.2.1 General
  • 11.3.2.1.1 Safety First
  • 11.3.2.2 FAA approval
  • 11.3.2.3 New rules for small UAS (sUAS)
  • 11.3.2.3.1 The Amendments
  • 11.3.2.4 Model aircraft
  • 11.3.3 EASA
  • 11.3.3.1 General
  • 11.3.3.2 The A-NPA 2015-10
  • 11.3.3.3 General remarks
  • 11.3.3.4 EASA member states
  • 12 - FROM AIRWORTHINESS TO 'SPACEWORTHINESS'?
  • 12.1 GENERAL
  • 12.2 THE NEW FAA RULES
  • 12.2.1 CHAPTER III - COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION
  • 12.2.1.1 Subchapter A - general
  • 12.2.1.2 Subchapter B - procedure
  • 12.2.1.3 Subchapter C - licensing
  • Subpart A - General and License Terms and Conditions
  • Subpart B - Launch Safety Responsibilities
  • Subpart C - Flight Safety Analysis
  • Subpart E - Ground Safety
  • 12.2.1.4 The experimental permit
  • 12.2.1.5 General remarks
  • 12.2.1.6 Advisory material
  • 12.3 A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE
  • List of Acronyms
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • Back Cover

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