3D Industrial Printing with Polymers

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 30. November 2018
  • |
  • 342 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-55531-5 (ISBN)
 
3D industrial printing has become mainstream in manufacturing. This unique book is the first to focus on polymers as the printing material.

The scientific literature with respect to 3D printing is collated in this monograph. The book opens with a chapter on foundational issues such and presents a broad overview of 3D printing procedures and the materials used therein. In particular, the methods of 3d printing are discussed and the polymers and composites used for 3d printing are detailed.

The book details the main fields of applications areas which include electric and magnetic uses, medical applications, and pharmaceutical applications. Electric and magnetic uses include electronic materials, actuators, piezoelectric materials, antennas, batteries and fuel cells. Medical applications are organ manufacturing, bone repair materials, drug-eluting coronary stents, and dental applications. The pharmaceutical applications are composite tablets, transdermal drug delivery, and patient-specific liquid capsules.

A special chapter deals with the growing aircraft and automotive uses for 3D printing, such as with manufacturing of aircraft parts and aircraft cabins. In the field of cars, 3D printing is gaining importance for automotive parts (brake components, drives), for the fabrication of automotive repair systems, and even 3D printed vehicles.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Newark
  • |
  • USA
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 3,21 MB
978-1-119-55531-5 (9781119555315)

weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Johannes Karl Fink is Professor of Macromolecular Chemistry at Montanuniversitat Leoben, Austria. His industry and academic career spans more than 30 years in the fields of polymers, and his research interests include characterization, flame retardancy, thermodynamics and the degradation of polymers, pyrolysis, and adhesives. Professor Fink has published several books on physical chemistry and polymer science including A Concise Introduction to Additives for Thermoplastic Polymers (Wiley-Scrivener 2009), The Chemistry of Biobased Polymers (Wiley-Scrivener 2014), and Polymer Waste Management (Wiley-Scrivener 2018).
Preface xi

1 Methods of 3D Printing 1

1.1 History 2

1.1.1 Recently Developed Materials for 3D Printing 5

1.1.2 Shrinkage Compensation 5

1.2 Basic Principles 9

1.2.1 4D Printing 10

1.3 Uses and Applications 10

1.3.1 Heat Exchangers 10

1.3.2 3D Plastic Model 10

1.3.3 Gradient Refractive Index Lenses 11

1.3.4 Photoformable Composition 13

1.3.5 Comb Polymers 13

1.3.6 Post-Processing Infiltration 14

1.3.7 Sensors and Biosensors 16

1.4 Magnetic Separation 19

1.5 Rapid Prototyping 20

1.5.1 Variants of Rapid Prototyping 22

1.5.2 3D Microfluidic Channel Systems 24

1.5.3 Aluminum and Magnesium Cores 24

1.5.4 Cellular Composites 25

1.5.5 Powder Compositions 25

1.5.6 Organopolysiloxane Compositions 26

1.5.7 Thermoplastic Powder Material 29

1.5.8 Plasticizer-Assisted Sintering 29

1.5.9 Radiation-Curable Resin Composition 29

1.6 Solution Mask Liquid Lithography 33

1.7 Vat Polymerization 34

1.7.1 Poly(dimethyl siloxane)-Based Photopolymer 35

1.8 Hot Lithography 37

1.9 Ambient Reactive Extrusion 37

1.10 Micromanufacturing Engineering 38

1.11 Analytical Uses 38

1.11.1 Gas Sensors 38

1.12 Chemical Engineering 39

1.12.1 Gas Separation 41

1.12.2 Hierarchical Monoliths for Carbon Monoxide Methanation 42

1.13 Rotating Spinnerets 43

1.14 Objects with Surface Microstructures 45

1.15 Lightweight Cellular Composites 46

1.16 Textiles 47

1.16.1 3D Printed Polymers Combined with Textiles 47

1.16.2 Mechanical and Electrical Contacting 47

1.16.3 Soft Electronic Textiles 48

1.16.4 4D Textiles 50

References 51

2 Polymers 61

2.1 Polymer Matrix Composites 61

2.1.1 Biocomposite Filaments 63

2.1.2 Nanocomposites 64

2.1.3 Nanowires 65

2.1.4 Fiber Reinforced Polymers 66

2.1.5 Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites 67

2.1.6 FDM Printing 70

2.1.7 Powder Bed and Inkjet Head 3D Printing 73

2.1.8 Stereolithography 73

2.1.9 Selective Laser Sintering 74

2.2 Sequential Interpenetrating Polymer Network 74

2.3 3D Printable Diamond Polymer Composite 75

2.4 Adhesives for 3D Printing 76

2.5 Voronoi-Based Composite Structures 77

2.6 Graphene Oxide Reinforced Complex Architectures 78

2.7 Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites 79

2.8 Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites 81

2.9 Additive Manufacturing 83

2.9.1 Thermosetting Polymers 85

2.9.2 UV Curable Materials 85

2.9.3 (Meth)acrylate Monomers 88

2.9.4 Thiol-ene and Thiol-yne Systems 91

2.9.5 Epoxides 94

2.10 Visible Light-Curable and Visible Wavelength-Transparent Resin 95

2.11 Poly(ether ether ketone) 96

2.12 Lasers 97

2.13 Ultra-High MolecularWeight PE 97

2.14 Production of PP Polymer Powders 98

2.15 Acrylate-Based Compositions 99

2.15.1 Dimensionally Stable Acrylic Alloys 99

2.15.2 Oligoester Acrylates 100

2.16 Standards 101

2.16.1 Biomedical Applications 102

2.16.2 Color 102

2.17 Particle-Free Emulsions 103

2.18 Shape Memory Polymers 104

2.18.1 Synthesis with Stereolithography 105

2.18.2 Flexible Electronics 105

2.18.3 Magnetically Responsive Shape Memory Polymer 108

2.18.4 Sequential Self-Folding Structures 109

2.18.5 Multi-shape Active Composites 111

2.18.6 Radiation Sensitizers 112

2.18.7 Shape Memory Alloy Actuating Wire 112

2.18.8 Metal Electrode Fabrication 114

2.18.9 4D Printing 115

2.19 Water-Soluble Polymer 117

2.20 Water-Washable Resin Formulations 122

2.21 Extremely Viscous Materials 124

2.21.1 Tunable Ionic Control of Polymeric Films 124

2.22 Photopolymer Compositions 125

2.22.1 Mechanical Properties of UV Curable Materials 125

2.22.2 High-Performance Photopolymer with Low Volume Shrinkage 126

2.22.3 Dual InitiationWavelengths for 3D Printing 127

2.23 Crosslinked Polymers 129

2.24 Recycled Plastics 132

2.25 3D Printed Fiber Reinforced Portland Cement Paste 133

2.26 Polymer-Derived Ceramics 134

2.26.1 Photocurable Ceramic/Polymer Composites 135

2.26.2 Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures 137

2.26.3 Selective Laser Melting 145

2.26.4 Stereolithography Resin for Rapid Prototyping of Ceramics and Metals 146

References 147

3 Airplanes and Cars 159

3.1 Airplanes 160

3.1.1 Material Testing Standards 161

3.1.2 Lightweight Aircraft Components 161

3.1.3 Aircraft Spare Parts 161

3.1.4 Polymer Laser Sintering 162

3.1.5 Composites Part Production 163

3.1.6 DeployableWing Designs 163

3.1.7 Additive Manufacturing for Aerospace 164

3.1.8 Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Components 164

3.1.9 Manufacturing of Aircraft Parts 165

3.1.10 Multirotor Vehicles 166

3.1.11 Flame Retardant Aircraft Carpet 166

3.1.12 Aircraft Cabins 167

3.1.13 Additive Manufacturing of Solid Rocket Propellant Grains 167

3.1.14 High Temperature Heating System 167

3.1.15 Aerospace Propulsion Components 168

3.1.16 Antenna RF Boxes 169

3.1.17 Cyanate Ester Clay Nanocomposites 170

3.1.18 Bionic Lightweight Design 170

3.2 Cars 172

3.2.1 Laser Sintering 173

3.2.2 Automotive Repair Systems 174

3.2.3 Improving Aerodynamic Shapes 174

3.2.4 Common Automotive Applications 174

3.2.5 Thermomechanical Pulp Fibers 178

3.2.6 Polyamic Acid Salts 178

3.2.7 Recycled Tempered Glass from the Automotive Industry 179

References 180

4 Electric and Magnetic Uses 185

4.1 Electric Uses 185

4.1.1 Conductive Microstructures 185

4.1.2 Modular Supercapacitors 188

4.1.3 Active Electronic Materials 189

4.1.4 Piezoelectric Materials 192

4.1.5 Holographic Metasurface Antenna 195

4.1.6 Waveguide 195

4.1.7 Fuel Cell 196

4.1.8 Batteries 198

4.2 Magnetic Uses 203

4.2.1 Polymer-Based Permanent Magnets 203

4.2.2 Bonded Magnets 207

4.2.3 Strontium Ferrite 208

4.2.4 Soft-Magnetic Composite 208

4.2.5 Discontinuous Fiber Composites by 3D Magnetic Printing 209

References 211

5 Medical Applications 215

5.1 Basic Procedures 215

5.1.1 Image Acquisition 216

5.1.2 3D Printing 217

5.1.3 Microvalve-Based Bioprinting 219

5.2 3D Printed Organ Models for Surgical Applications 219

5.2.1 Organ Bioprinting 220

5.2.2 Materials 223

5.2.3 Liver 229

5.2.4 Heart 230

5.2.5 Cartilage 232

5.2.6 Bionic Ears 233

5.2.7 Skin 234

5.2.8 Scaffolds 235

5.2.9 Personalized Implants 238

5.2.10 Neural Tissue Models 238

5.3 Bioinks 241

5.3.1 Cytocompatible Bioink 243

5.3.2 Hydrogel Bioinks 246

5.3.3 Dentin-Derived Hydrogel Bioink 248

5.3.4 Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Materials 249

5.3.5 Silk-Based Bioink 251

5.3.6 Nanoengineered Ionic-Covalent Entanglement Bioinks 252

5.3.7 Living Skin Constructs 253

5.3.8 Cell-Laden Scaffolds 253

5.3.9 Patient-Specific Bioinks 255

5.4 Presurgical Simulation 256

5.5 Models with Integrated Soft Tactile Sensors 256

5.6 Dental Applications 256

5.6.1 Prosthetics 257

5.7 Fluidic Devices 259

5.8 3D Bioprinting of Tissues and Organs 259

5.8.1 3D Bioprinting Techniques 261

5.8.2 Pigmented Human Skin Constructs 262

5.8.3 Strategies for Tissue Engineering 263

5.8.4 Bone Tissue 264

5.8.5 Neuroregenerative Treatment 267

5.8.6 3D Tissues/Organs Combined with Microfluidics 267

5.8.7 3D Microfibrous Constructs 268

5.8.8 Biosynthetic Cellulose Implants 274

5.8.9 Polysaccharides 276

5.8.10 Corneal Transplants 277

5.8.11 Hydrogels from Collagen 278

5.8.12 Dissolved Cellulose 278

5.8.13 Hydrogels from Hyaluronic Acid and Methyl cellulose 279

5.8.14 Stem Cells 282

5.8.15 Autografts 283

5.8.16 Drug-Eluting Coronary Stents 284

5.9 Biomedical Devices 285

5.10 Soft Somatosensitive Actuators 286

References 287

6 Pharmaceutical Uses 303

6.1 Drug Release 303

6.1.1 Pharmaceutical 3D Printing 304

6.1.2 Pharmaceutically Acceptable Amorphous Polymers 304

6.1.3 Paracetamol Oral Tablets 305

6.1.4 Patient-Specific Liquid Capsules 306

6.1.5 Thermolabile Drugs 307

6.1.6 Composite Tablets 308

6.1.7 Transdermal Drug Delivery 309

6.1.8 Chip Platforms for Microarray 3D Bioprinting 309

References 314

Index 317

Acronyms 317

Chemicals 320

General Index 324

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