The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics

 
 
Oxford University Press
  • erschienen am 9. Oktober 2020
  • |
  • 720 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-19-255872-5 (ISBN)
 
The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics is a major new contribution to the study of contemporary European and Greek politics. This edited volume contains 43 chapters written by Greek and foreign academics foremost in their field. After an introductory section, offering a frame of analysis, the volume includes sections on political institutions, traditions and party families, political and social interest groups, policy-making and policy sectors, external relations, and Greece's most important political leaders of the period between the 1974 transition to democracy and today. It will be an invaluable reference for scholars, new and established, as well as for the informed reader around the world. This work offers the most comprehensive approach to the subject to this day. Drawing on data and analysis previously available only in national sources (Greek books, articles, and other primary and secondary sources), in combination with international data, it allows international scholars of politics, international relations, society, and economy to integrate the case of Greece in their own projects; and facilitates the search of any informed reader who seeks a reliable, updated source on Modern Greece.
  • Englisch
  • Oxford
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 4,53 MB
978-0-19-255872-5 (9780192558725)
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Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is the long-term Director of the Hellenic Observatory. His publications include Prime Ministers in Greece: The Paradox of Power (with Dimitris Papadimitrou, OUP, 2015) and The Politics of Europeanization (edited with Claudio Radaelli, OUP, 2003). Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. He also serves as Senior Research Fellow of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy Studies (ELIAMEP, Athens) and Research Associate of the Hellenic Observatory at the London School of Economics. His publications include The State and Democracy in the New Southern Europe (edited with Richard Gunther and P. Nikiforos Diamandouros, OU, 2006).
  • Cover
  • The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics
  • Copyright
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • List of Abbreviations
  • List of Contributors
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: Identifying Greece
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Greece as a Focus
  • 1.3 Identifying Greece
  • 1.4 State-Economy
  • 1.5 The State and its Institutions
  • 1.6 State and Society
  • 1.7 The State and the Party System
  • 1.8 The State and the Crisis
  • 1.9 System Complementarities and Imbalances
  • 1.10 Segmented Society, Dependent State
  • 1.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Section 1: The Frame
  • Chapter 2: The Developmental Trajectory of the Greek State
  • 2.1 Introduction: The Greek Puzzle
  • 2.2 Unravelling the Puzzle
  • 2.2.1 Seven Booms
  • 2.2.2 Seven Busts
  • 2.2.3 Seven Bailouts
  • 2.3 Key Insight: Early Late Modernization
  • 2.4 Conclusion: Where Next?
  • References
  • Chapter 3: State-Society Relations in Greece
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 The State in Focus
  • 3.3 Society Associated eith the State Through Political Clientelism and State Corporatism
  • 3.3.1 Rampant Political Clientelism
  • 3.3.2 Particularistic State Corporatism
  • 3.4 Society Mobilizing Against the State
  • 3.5 Society's Detachment from and Avoidance of the State
  • 3.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4: State-Market Relations
  • 4.1 Introduction: The Evolution of State-Market Relations
  • 4.2 Evolving Contexts and Comparative Frameworks
  • 4.2.1 Developmentalism
  • 4.2.2 Democratization
  • 4.2.3 Europeanization
  • 4.2.4 From Nationalization to Privatization
  • 4.2.5 EMU Crisis and Forced Adjustment
  • 4.3 Greek Exceptionalism and its Limits
  • 4.4 'Varieties of Capitalism' and Greece
  • 4.5 Conclusions and Challenges for Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 5: The Politics of Europeanization
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Images and Meanings of Europe in Greece
  • 5.3 The Impact of Europeanization
  • 5.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Church, State, and Hellenism
  • Introduction
  • 6.1 Autocephaly and Nation-Building
  • 6.2 One Nation-State, Multiple Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions
  • 6.3 The Church of Greece as a National Church
  • References
  • Section 2: Political Institutions
  • Chapter 7: Greek Constitutionalism and Patterns of Government
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The Sparkling Aspect of the Past
  • 7.3 The Dark Aspect of Greek Constitutionalism's Historical Trajectory
  • 7.4 Government and the Economic Crisis
  • 7.5 The Scope of Constitutional Reform
  • 7.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: The Judiciary
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Basic Elements in Comparative Context
  • 8.3 Courts and Politics: Elements of the Greek Rule-of-Law Paradigm
  • 8.3.1 When Judges Rule Beyond Legal Standards: Judicial Activism and Judicialization of Politics
  • Economy during the Eurozone Crisis
  • National and Religious Identity
  • Environmental Issues
  • 8.3.2 When Politics Rule instead of Law: Judicial (In)Dependence
  • 8.3.3 When the Law Does Not Rule: Judicial Ineffectiveness
  • 8.4 Research Agendas for the Future
  • References
  • Chapter 9: The Prime Minister and the Core Executive
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Entering the Labyrinth of the Greek Core Executive
  • 9.3 The Historical Evolution of the Greek Core Executive
  • 9.4 Leadership Styles and Institutionalization
  • 9.5 The System's Nemesis?
  • 9.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10: The Parliament
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 The Parliament within the Constitutional Architecture
  • 10.3 Privileges and Immunities
  • 10.4 System Interpolarity and Functional Distinctiveness
  • 10.4.1 Vis-à-Vis the Executive
  • 10.4.2 Vis-à-Vis the President of the Republic
  • 10.4.3 Vis-à-Vis the Judiciary
  • 10.4.4 Vis-à-Vis International Organisations
  • 10.5 Parliament and Political Practice
  • 10.5.1 Majoritarian and Divisive Parliamentarism
  • 10.5.2 Clientelism and Nepotism
  • 10.6 Imbalanced Parliamentarism
  • 10.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Public Administration
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 The legacies: A 'Quasi-Weberian' Bureaucracy
  • 11.3 Three Deficits: Legitimacy, Efficiency, Institutionalization
  • 11.4 Politicization and Symbiosis
  • 11.5 The Rise and Fall of the Modernization Narrative
  • 11.6 Towards a Neo-Weberian State?
  • 11.7 Drivers for Reform: Europeanization as an External Constraint
  • 11.8 Change and Continuity: Administrative Reform in Times of Crisis
  • 11.9 Memoranda Agenda and Selected Reforms
  • 11.10 Flaws, Resistance and Side Effects
  • 11.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Local Government and Regional Administration
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 The Constitutional Status of Local Government
  • 12.3 Sub-National Democracy
  • 12.4 The Structure of Local and Regional Public Administration
  • 12.5 Administrative Functions
  • 12.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13: The Electoral System
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 The Six (plus one) Lives of the Electoral System in the Third Greek Republic
  • 13.1.1 Life 1: The 1974 Election
  • 13.1.2 Life 2: The 1977 and 1981 Elections
  • 13.1.3 Life 3: The 1985 Election
  • 13.1.4 Life 4: The 1989 and 1990 Elections
  • 13.1.5 Life 5: The 1993, 1996, 2000, and 2004 Elections
  • 13.1.6 Life 6 (Plus One): The 2007, 2009, 2012, and 2015 Elections
  • 13.2 A New Equilibrium?
  • 13.3 Conclusion: The Life After
  • References
  • Chapter 14: The Party System
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Main Issues and Concepts
  • 14.3 The Historical Course of the Greek Party System
  • 14.3.1 The Pre-History, 1915-1967
  • 14.3.2 The History: After the Dictatorship, beforethe Crisis. 1974-2009
  • 14.4 The Greek Party System During the Economic Crisis: Continuities and Ruptures with the Past
  • 14.5 Conclusion: The Future of the Greek Party System and Future Research
  • References
  • Section 3: Political Traditions
  • Chapter 15: The Far Right
  • 15.1 Introduction: The Electoral Dynamics of the Far Right in Greece
  • 15.2 The Breeding Ground for Greece's Far Right
  • 15.2.1 Demand-Side Factors: Grievances
  • 15.2.2 Supply-Side Factors: Ideological-Communicational-Organizational
  • 15.3 The Far Right-Wing Party Stage: Populist-Radical and Extremist Components
  • 15.3.1 The Populist-Radical Right 'LAOS'
  • 15.3.2 A Militia-Like Neo-Nazi Party: Golden Dawn
  • 15.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16: The Conservatives
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 The Creation and the Early Years of the New Democracy Party
  • 16.3 New Democracy after its Founder's Withdrawal: The Liberal Experiment
  • 16.4 The Long Opposition Years: A Lost Chance for ND's Reform and Modernization
  • 16.5 ND's Return to Office: Economic Crisis, and the Critical 2012 Election
  • 16.6 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 17: The Centre
  • 17.1 Introduction: The Historical Background
  • 17.2 The 1970s and the Disintegration of the Centre
  • 17.3 The Era of PASOK and the Centre-Left
  • 17.4 A Revival or a New Centre?
  • 17.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: The Socialists
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Setting the Scene
  • 18.3 PASOK in Power
  • 18.4 From Opposition to the Management of the Economic Crisis
  • 18.5 The Return of Populism
  • 18.6 Conclusions: Greek Social Democracy in Search of its Identity
  • References
  • Chapter 19: The Radical Left
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 SYRIZA and the European Radical Left
  • 19.3 Turbulent History
  • 19.4 The Rise to Government: The Structure of Political Opportunities
  • 19.5 A 'Seller of Hope': Agency Matters
  • 19.6 The Radical Left in Office: Contradictions and Limitations
  • 19.7 The Party and Government
  • 19.8 Conclusions: Politics of Symbolism and Defence
  • References
  • Chapter 20: The Communists
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 The Greek Communist Strategy and its Historical Legacies
  • 20.3 Ideological Orientation and Programmatic References
  • 20.4 Organization and Mobilization
  • 20.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Section 4: Political and Social Interests
  • Chapter 21: Political Culture
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Greece's Cultural Dualism
  • 21.3 Types of Engagement
  • 21.4 Citizenship and Political (In) Equality
  • 21.5 Solidarity and the Politics of Consensus
  • 21.6 Social Structures of Cooperation
  • 21.7 Illiberal Orientations of Greek Political Culture
  • 21.8 Greek Political Culture in the Context of Crisis
  • 21.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Civil Society
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Causes of Civil Society's Weakness
  • 22.3 The Relationship of Civil Society with State and EU Authorities
  • 22.4 The Economic Crisis
  • 22.5 Philanthropy vs Social Solidarity
  • 22.6 Post-Crisis Civil Society
  • 22.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Social Movements
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 The Student Movement
  • 23.3 The Feminist Movement
  • 23.4 The Green Spectrum
  • 23.5 The Alter-Globalization Movement
  • 23.6 The Civil Unrest of December 2008
  • 23.7 Anti-Austerity Protests and the Movement of the Squares (or the Greek Indignados)
  • 23.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Interest Group Politics
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Authoritarian Legacy: State Corporatism
  • 24.2.1 Labour Unions
  • 24.2.2 Farmers' Associations
  • 24.3 Beyond State Corporatism
  • 24.4 The Economic Crisis: 2010-2018
  • 24.4.1 The Enacted Reform Measures
  • 24.4.2 The Impact of the Crisis on Interest Group Organization
  • 24.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Voting Behaviour
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Social Divisions
  • 25.3 Can we turn this into Context and Voter Characteristics
  • 25.4 Sociological and Psychological Determinants of Voting
  • 25.5 Economic Voting
  • 25.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26: The Media
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Low Levels of Newspaper Circulation
  • 26.3 Political Parallelism
  • 26.4 Instrumentalization of Media
  • 26.5 Governmental Control over Public Broadcasting
  • 26.6 Savage Deregulation and the Politics of the TV Licences
  • 26.7 Limited Professionalization
  • 26.8 The Rise of the New Media
  • 26.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 27: Terrorism
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Greek Political Violence in Context
  • 27.3 The Metapolitefsi Terrorists
  • 27.4 The End of the Metapolitefsi Terrorism
  • 27.5 The Post-17N Generation
  • 27.6 Why Does Greek Terrorism Persist?
  • References
  • Section 5: Policy-Making
  • Chapter 28: Government Policy-Making
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 Pre-Crisis Government Policy-Making
  • 28.3 Government Policy-Making during the Crisis
  • 28.4 The Changing Role of Expertise
  • 28.4.1 University Departments
  • 28.4.2 Government-funded Research Institutes
  • 28.4.3 In-House Research Structures
  • 28.4.4 Policy Research Institutes and Think Tanks
  • 28.4.5 Research Institutes Affiliated to Political Actors
  • 28.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 29: The State and Economic Development
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Long-Term Determinants of Greece's Post-War Economic Development
  • 29.2.1 The Ambivalent Role of the State
  • 29.2.2 The Persistent External Deficits and the Weak Technological, Innovation, and Knowledge Capabilities
  • 29.2.3 Macro-Economic Imbalances and Economic Development
  • 29.2.4 The Increasing Weight of Public Debt
  • 29.2.5 The Pension System Deficits and Their Impact on Growth
  • 29.3 The Six Stages of Greece's Post-War Economic Development
  • 29.3.1 Greece's 'Easy Development' Phase (1955-73)
  • 29.3.2 Development After the First Post-War Crisis (1974-81)
  • 29.3.3 Socialist Governance and World Market Integration (1982-93)
  • 29.3.4 From Structural Imbalances to a New Growth Cycle and to Euro Area Participation (1994-2003)
  • 29.3.5 The Build-Up to the Crisis (2004-9)
  • 29.3.6 The Crisis of 2008/09 and its Aftermath
  • 29.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 30: The Politics of the Public Finances
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 The Pre-Crisis Fiscal Governance Framework
  • 30.3 Fiscal Governance in the Memorandum Era
  • 30.4 Challenges Ahead
  • References
  • Chapter 31: Pensions in the Greek Political Economy
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 'Method behind Madness'-The Logics of Pensions
  • 31.3 Structural Implications of Pension Dysfunctionality
  • 31.3.1 Pensions and Sectional Politics
  • 31.3.2 Pension Governance, Trade Unions and Individuals
  • 31.4 'Words without Actions'-Pre-Crisis Pension Reforms
  • 31.5 'Actions Without Words' Bailout-Era Pension Reforms
  • 31.6 Looking Ahead-Ageing and Continuity
  • References
  • Chapter 32: Health Policy and Politics
  • 32.1 Introduction
  • 32.2 What is Distinctive about the Greek Health-Care System?
  • 32.3 Historical Background
  • 32.4 The Incomplete Shift to a National Health System and the Failed Reform at the Turn of the Century
  • 32.4.1 Process and Dynamics of Reform
  • 32.4.2 Funding, Regulation, and Provision
  • 32.5 The Crisis as a Watershed Moment for Health-Care Reform
  • 32.5.1 Process and Dynamics of Reform
  • 32.5.2 Funding, Regulation, and Provision
  • 32.6 Concluding Remarks and Areas of Further Research
  • References
  • Chapter 33: Poverty and the Social Safety Net
  • 33.1 Introduction
  • 33.2 Policy Developments in 1974-2009
  • 33.3 The Demand for Social Protection since 2010
  • 33.4 The Supply of Social Protection under Austerity
  • 33.5 Poverty and Social Exclusion
  • 33.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 34: Education
  • 34.1 Introduction
  • 34.2 Brief Overview of Greece's Education System
  • 34.3 Concepts and Discourses in Greek Education Policy
  • 34.4 The School as an Institution
  • 34.5 Reform: A Grounded Approach or a Political Tool?
  • 34.6 Excellence and Democratization of Education
  • 34.7 The Politics of Higher Education
  • 34.8 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 35: Migration in Greece
  • 35.1 Introduction
  • 35.2 Migrant Population in Greece
  • 35.3 Greek Migration Policy Development
  • 35.3.1 The Early Period: Migrants as Labour Force
  • 35.3.2 The Later Period: Migration between Security and Humanitarian Concerns
  • 35.4 Greek Citizenship Reform
  • 35.5 Migrant Integration and Racism in Greece
  • 35.6 Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Section 6: External Relations
  • Chapter 36: Defence and Security Policy
  • 36.1 Introduction
  • 36.2 The Evolution of Greece's National Security Policy
  • 36.3 The Transformation of Greece's Security Environment in the Late Twentieth and the Early Twenty-First Centuries
  • 36.4 Security Challenges and Priorities
  • 36.5 Soft/Asymmetric Security Threats
  • 36.6 Greek Defence Doctrine
  • 36.7 The Defence and Security Decision Making Mechanism
  • 36.8 Defence Expenditures
  • 36.9 Greek Security Policy in a Comparative Context
  • 36.10 Greece's Contemporary Geostrategic Value and its Role in the Context of the EU and NATO
  • 36.11 The European and Transatlantic Dimensions
  • 36.12 State of the Art Regarding Research and Analysis in the Field of Greek Security Policy
  • 36.13 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 37: Greece and the European Union: strategic vision, diplomatic finesse and poor domestic delivery
  • 37.1 Introduction
  • 37.2 Early History
  • 37.3 (Mal)Adjusting to Membership
  • 37.4 Learning from Experience
  • 37.5 What Went Wrong with the Euro?
  • 37.6 In a State of Quarantine
  • 37.7 A Country of Many Contradictions
  • References
  • Chapter 38: Greek Foreign Policy Since the Metapolitefsi
  • 38.1 Introduction
  • 38.2 Seeking Security
  • Seeking a Role: Between the US and the EU
  • 38.3 The Determinism of the International Milieu
  • 38.4 The Domestic Environment: The Primacy of Sentiment over System in Policy Formulation
  • 38.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 39: Greek-Turkish Relations
  • 39.1 Introduction
  • 39.2 The EU as a Novel Factor: The Road to Helsinki
  • 39.3 The Helsinki Watershed: Recasting Greek-Turkish Relations
  • 39.4 A Double Opportunity Missed in 2004
  • 39.5 The Achievements of the Rapprochement
  • 39.5.1 Economic Relations
  • 39.5.2 Energy
  • 39.5.3 Minority Rights
  • 39.6 The Effects of the Crisis and the Arab Uprisings
  • 39.6.1 Greece's Strategic Puzzle
  • 39.6.2 Balancing Turkey in the Region
  • 39.6.3 Energy Cooperation and its Limits
  • 39.6.4 Civil Society
  • 39.6.5 Mental Barriers to Compromise
  • 39.6.6 The Effect of Domestic Politics and Cyprus
  • 39.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Section 7: Leaders
  • Chapter 40: Constantine Keramanlis
  • 40.1 Introduction
  • 40.2 A Long Political Career
  • 40.3 Popular Support Base
  • 40.4 Style of Leadership and Ideology
  • 40.5 Position within the party(ies)
  • 40.6 Legacies
  • References
  • Chapter 41: Andreas Papandreou
  • 41.1 Introduction
  • 41.2 Emergence
  • 41.3 The 'Establishment' and the 'Plots'
  • 41.3.1 'Scheming'
  • 41.3.2 Appropriation of 'Progressive Nationalism'
  • 41.4 The September 3 Manifesto and PASOK's National Liberation Character
  • 41.5 The Experience of Governmental Power: Clashing with Reality
  • 41.6 PASOK: Between Social Democracy and Populism?
  • 41.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 42: Costas Simitis
  • 42.1 Introduction
  • 42.2 Two Ideal Types of Culture and Leadership
  • 42.3 Simitis's Leadership Style
  • 42.4 Intense Loyalty and Differentness: A Delicate Balancing Exercise in Autonomy
  • 42.5 A Comparative Perspective
  • 42.6 Network-Building
  • 42.7 The Post-Authoritarian Period (1974-)
  • 42.8 Assessing Simitis's Leadership Style
  • 42.9 The Downsides of Simitis's Leadership Style
  • 42.10 Assessing Simitis's Legacy
  • References
  • Chapter 43: Alexis Tsipras
  • 43.1 Introduction
  • 43.2 Norms, Institutional Constraints and Political Leadership
  • 43.3 Eurocommunism and the New Social Movements
  • 43.4 Leadership style
  • 43.4.1 Inclusive to Personalistic/Presidentialist Leadership
  • 43.4.2 From Maverick to Mainstream Leadership
  • 43.5 Policy Shifts
  • 43.6 Legacy
  • References
  • Index of Names
  • Subject Index

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