Mobility Protocols and Handover Optimization

Design, Evaluation and Application
 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 7. März 2014
  • |
  • 480 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-94551-2 (ISBN)
 
This book provides a common framework for mobilitymanagement that considers the theoretical and practical aspects ofsystems optimization for mobile networks.
In this book, the authors show how an optimized system ofmobility management can improve the quality of service in existingforms of mobile communication. Furthermore, they provide atheoretical approach to mobility management, as well as developingthe model for systems optimization, including practical casestudies using network layer and mobility layer protocols indifferent deployment scenarios. The authors also address thedifferent ways in which the specific mobility protocol can bedeveloped, taking into account numerous factors including security,configuration, authentication, quality of service, and movementpatterns of the mobiles.
Key Features:
* Defines and discusses a common set of optimizationmethodologies and their application to all mobility protocols forboth IPv4 and IPv6 networks
* Applies these technologies in the context of various layers:MAC layer, network layer, transport layer and application layercovering 802.11, LTE, WiMax, CDMA networks and protocols such asSIP, MIP, HIP, VoIP, and many more
* Provides a thorough analysis of the required steps during amobility event such as discovery, network selection, configuration,authentication, security association, encryption, binding update,and media direction
* Includes models and tables illustrating the analysis ofmobility management as well as architecture of sample wireless andmobility test beds built by the authors, involving inter-domain andintra-domain mobility scenarios
This book is an excellent resource forprofessionals and systemsarchitects in charge of designing wireless networks for commercial(3G/4G), LTE, IMS, military and Ad Hoc environment. It will beuseful deployment guide for the architects wireless serviceproviders. Graduate students, researchers in industry and academia,and systems engineers will also find this book of interest.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • New York
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 16,64 MB
978-1-119-94551-2 (9781119945512)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Dr. Ashutosh Dutta
Dr. Ashutosh Dutta obtained his Ph.D. in EE from ColumbiaUniversity, M.S. in Computer Science from NJIT, USA and BSEE fromNIT, Rourkela, India. As a seasoned mobility and security architectand an accomplished networking and computer science expert with20-plus years experience, Ashutosh directed multiple IT operations,led the research and development for leading global technologycorporations and top university and has in-depth expertise indeveloping and implementing research, analysis and designinitiatives.
His career spanning 25 years includes LMTS (Lead Member ofTechnical Staff) at AT&T, NJ; CTO Wireless at NIKSUN, NJ;Senior Scientist in Telcordia Technologies, NJ; CRF Director atColumbia University, NY and Computer Engineer with TATA Motors,India. Ashutosh's research interests include wirelessInternet, multimedia signaling, mobility management, 4G networks,IMS (IP Multimedia Subsystems), VoIP and session controlprotocols. He has published more than 80 conference, journalpapers and Internet drafts, three book chapters, and has giventutorials in mobility management at various conferences. Ashutoshhas 19 issued security and mobility related US patents.
Ashutosh is a senior member of IEEE and ACM. He has served as anIEEE volunteer and leader at the section, region, chapter, society,MGA, and EAB level. Ashutosh is recipient of the 2009 IEEE Region1, IEEE MGA and 2010 IEEE-USA Leadership Awards.
Prof. Henning Schulzrinne
Prof. Henning Schulzrinne, Levi Professor of Computer Scienceat Columbia University, received his Ph.D. from theUniversity of Massachusetts in Amherst, Massachusetts. He wasan MTS at AT&T Bell Laboratories and an associate departmenthead at GMD-Fokus (Berlin), before joining the Computer Science andElectrical Engineering departments at Columbia University. Heserved as chair of the Department of Computer Science from 2004 to2009, as Engineering Fellow at the US Federal CommunicationsCommission (FCC) in 2010 and 2011, and as Chief Technology Officerat the FCC since 2012.
He has published more than 250 journal and conference papers, andmore than 70 Internet RFCs. Protocols co-developed by him,such as RTP, RTSP and SIP, are now Internet standards, used byalmost all Internet telephony and multimedia applications. His research interests include Internet multimedia systems,ubiquitous computing, and mobile systems.
He is a Fellow of the IEEE, has received the New York City Mayor'sAward for Excellence in Science and Technology, the VON PioneerAward, TCCC service award, the IEEE Region 1 William Terry Awardfor Lifetime Distinguished Service to IEEE and the UMass ComputerScience Outstanding Alumni recognition.
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Chapter 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Types of Mobility
  • 1.1.1 Terminal Mobility
  • 1.1.2 Personal Mobility
  • 1.1.3 Session Mobility
  • 1.1.4 Service Mobility
  • 1.2 Performance Requirements
  • 1.3 Motivation
  • 1.4 Summary of Key Contributions
  • Chapter 2 Analysis of Mobility Protocols for Multimedia
  • 2.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 2.2 Introduction
  • 2.3 Cellular 1G
  • 2.3.1 System Architecture
  • 2.3.2 Handoff Procedure
  • 2.4 Cellular 2G Mobility
  • 2.4.1 GSM
  • 2.4.2 IS-95
  • 2.5 Cellular 3G Mobility
  • 2.5.1 WCDMA
  • 2.5.2 CDMA2000
  • 2.6 4G Networks
  • 2.6.1 Evolved Packet System
  • 2.6.2 WiMAX Mobility
  • 2.7 IP-Based Mobility
  • 2.7.1 Network Layer Macromobility
  • 2.7.2 Network Layer Micromobility
  • 2.7.3 NETMOB: Network Mobility
  • 2.7.4 Transport Layer Mobility
  • 2.7.5 Application Layer Mobility
  • 2.7.6 Host Identity Protocol
  • 2.7.7 MOBIKE
  • 2.7.8 IAPP
  • 2.8 Heterogeneous Handover
  • 2.8.1 UMTS-WLAN Handover
  • 2.8.2 LTE-WLAN Handover
  • 2.9 Multicast Mobility
  • 2.10 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 3 Systems Analysis of Mobility Events
  • 3.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 3.2 Introduction
  • 3.2.1 Comparative Analysis of Mobility Protocols
  • 3.3 Analysis of Handoff Components
  • 3.3.1 Network Discovery and Selection
  • 3.3.2 Network Attachment
  • 3.3.3 Configuration
  • 3.3.4 Security Association
  • 3.3.5 Binding Update
  • 3.3.6 Media Rerouting
  • 3.4 Effect of Handoff across Layers
  • 3.4.1 Layer 2 Delay
  • 3.4.2 Layer 3 Delay
  • 3.4.3 Application Layer Delay
  • 3.4.4 Handoff Operations across Layers
  • 3.5 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 4 Modeling Mobility
  • 4.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 4.2 Introduction
  • 4.3 Related Work
  • 4.4 Modeling Mobility as a Discrete-Event Dynamic System
  • 4.5 Petri Net Primitives
  • 4.6 Petri-Net-Based Modeling Methodologies
  • 4.7 Resource Utilization during Handoff
  • 4.8 Data Dependency Analysis of the Handoff Process
  • 4.8.1 Petri-Net-Based Data Dependency
  • 4.8.2 Analysis of Data Dependency during Handoff Process
  • 4.9 Petri Net Model for Handoff
  • 4.10 Petri-Net-Based Analysis of Handoff Event
  • 4.10.1 Analysis of Deadlocks in Handoff
  • 4.10.2 Reachability Analysis
  • 4.10.3 Matrix Equations
  • 4.11 Evaluation of Systems Performance Using Petri Nets
  • 4.11.1 Cycle-Time-Based Approach
  • 4.11.2 Floyd-Algorithm-Based Approach
  • 4.11.3 Resource-Time Product Approach
  • 4.12 Opportunities for Optimization
  • 4.12.1 Analysis of Parallelism in Handoff Operations
  • 4.12.2 Opportunities for Proactive Operation
  • 4.13 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 5 Layer 2 Optimization
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Related Work
  • 5.3 IEEE 802.11 Standards
  • 5.3.1 The IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN Architecture
  • 5.3.2 IEEE 802.11 Management Frames
  • 5.4 Handoff Procedure with Active Scanning
  • 5.4.1 Steps during Handoff
  • 5.5 Fast-Handoff Algorithm
  • 5.5.1 Selective Scanning
  • 5.5.2 Caching
  • 5.6 Implementation
  • 5.6.1 The HostAP Driver
  • 5.7 Measurements
  • 5.7.1 Experimental Setup
  • 5.7.2 The Environment
  • 5.7.3 Experiments
  • 5.8 Measurement Results
  • 5.8.1 Handoff Time
  • 5.8.2 Packet Loss
  • 5.9 Conclusions and Future Work
  • Chapter 6 Mobility Optimization Techniques
  • 6.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 6.1.1 Discovery
  • 6.1.2 Authentication
  • 6.1.3 Layer 3 Configuration
  • 6.1.4 Layer 3 Security Association
  • 6.1.5 Binding Update
  • 6.1.6 Media Rerouting
  • 6.1.7 Route Optimization
  • 6.1.8 Media-Independent Cross-Layer Triggers
  • 6.2 Introduction
  • 6.3 Discovery
  • 6.3.1 Key Principles
  • 6.3.2 Related Work
  • 6.3.3 Application Layer Discovery
  • 6.3.4 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.4 Authentication
  • 6.4.1 Key Principles
  • 6.4.2 Related Work
  • 6.4.3 Network-Layer-Assisted Preauthentication
  • 6.4.4 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.5 Layer 3 Configuration
  • 6.5.1 Key Principles
  • 6.5.2 Related Work
  • 6.5.3 Router-Assisted Duplicate Address Detection
  • 6.5.4 Proactive IP Address Configuration
  • 6.5.5 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.6 Layer 3 Security Association
  • 6.6.1 Key Principles
  • 6.6.2 Related Work
  • 6.6.3 Anchor-Assisted Security Association
  • 6.6.4 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.7 Binding Update
  • 6.7.1 Key Principles
  • 6.7.2 Related Work
  • 6.7.3 Hierarchical Binding Update
  • 6.7.4 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.7.5 Proactive Binding Update
  • 6.8 Media Rerouting
  • 6.8.1 Key Principles
  • 6.8.2 Related Work
  • 6.8.3 Data Redirection Using Forwarding Agent
  • 6.8.4 Mobility-Proxy-Assisted Time-Bound Data Redirection
  • 6.8.5 Time-Bound Localized Multicasting
  • 6.9 Media Buffering
  • 6.9.1 Key Principles
  • 6.9.2 Related Work
  • 6.9.3 Protocol for Edge Buffering
  • 6.9.4 Experimental Results and Analysis
  • 6.9.5 Analysis of the Trade-off between Buffering Delay and Packet Loss
  • 6.10 Route Optimization
  • 6.10.1 Key Principles
  • 6.10.2 Related Work
  • 6.10.3 Maintaining a Direct Path by Application Layer Mobility
  • 6.10.4 Interceptor-Assisted Packet Modifier at the End Point
  • 6.10.5 Intercepting Proxy-Assisted Route Optimization
  • 6.10.6 Cost Analysis and Experimental Analysis
  • 6.10.7 Binding-Cache-Based Route Optimization
  • 6.11 Media-Independent Cross-Layer Triggers
  • 6.11.1 Key Principles
  • 6.11.2 Related Work
  • 6.11.3 Media Independent Handover Function
  • 6.11.4 Faster Link-Down Detection Scheme
  • 6.12 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 7 Optimization with Multilayer Mobility Protocols
  • 7.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 7.2 Introduction
  • 7.3 Key Principles
  • 7.4 Related Work
  • 7.5 Multilayer Mobility Approach
  • 7.5.1 Policy-Based Mobility Protocols: SIP and MIP-LR
  • 7.5.2 Integration of SIP and MIP-LR with MMP
  • 7.5.3 Integration of Global Mobility Protocol with Micromobility Protocol
  • 7.5.4 Implementation of Multilayer Mobility Protocols
  • 7.5.5 Implementation and Performance Issues
  • 7.6 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 8 Optimizations for Simultaneous Mobility
  • 8.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 8.2 Introduction
  • 8.2.1 Analysis of Simultaneous Mobility
  • 8.3 Illustration of the Simultaneous Mobility Problem
  • 8.4 Related Work
  • 8.5 Key Optimization Techniques
  • 8.6 Analytical Framework
  • 8.6.1 Fundamental Concepts
  • 8.6.2 Handoff Sequences
  • 8.6.3 Binding Updates
  • 8.6.4 Location Proxies and Binding Update Proxies
  • 8.7 Analyzing the Simultaneous Mobility Problem
  • 8.8 Probability of Simultaneous Mobility
  • 8.9 Solutions
  • 8.9.1 Soft Handoff
  • 8.9.2 Receiver-Side Mechanisms
  • 8.9.3 Sender-Side Mechanisms
  • 8.10 Application of Solution Mechanisms
  • 8.10.1 Mobile IPv6
  • 8.10.2 MIP-LR
  • 8.10.3 SIP-Based Mobility
  • 8.11 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 9 Handoff Optimization for Multicast Streaming
  • 9.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 9.2 Introduction
  • 9.3 Key Principles
  • 9.4 Related Work
  • 9.5 Mobility in a Hierarchical Multicast Architecture
  • 9.5.1 Channel Announcement
  • 9.5.2 Channel Management
  • 9.5.3 Channel Tuning
  • 9.5.4 Local Advertisement Insertion
  • 9.5.5 Channel Monitor
  • 9.5.6 Security
  • 9.6 Optimization Techniques for Multicast Media Delivery
  • 9.6.1 Reactive Triggering
  • 9.6.2 Proactive Triggering
  • 9.6.3 Triggering during Configuration of a Mobile
  • 9.7 Experimental Results and Performance Analysis
  • 9.7.1 Experimental Results
  • 9.7.2 Performance Analysis
  • 9.8 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 10 Cooperative Roaming
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Related Work
  • 10.3 IP Multicast Addressing
  • 10.4 Cooperative Roaming
  • 10.4.1 Overview
  • 10.4.2 L2 Cooperation Protocol
  • 10.4.3 L3 Cooperation Protocol
  • 10.5 Cooperative Authentication
  • 10.5.1 Overview of IEEE 802.1x
  • 10.5.2 Cooperation in the Authentication Process
  • 10.5.3 Relay Process
  • 10.6 Security
  • 10.6.1 Security Issues in Roaming
  • 10.6.2 Cooperative Authentication and Security
  • 10.7 Streaming Media Support
  • 10.8 Bandwidth and Energy Usage
  • 10.9 Experiments
  • 10.9.1 Environment
  • 10.9.2 Implementation Details
  • 10.9.3 Experimental Setup
  • 10.9.4 Results
  • 10.10 Application Layer Mobility
  • 10.11 Load Balancing
  • 10.12 Multicast and Scalability
  • 10.13 An Alternative to Multicast
  • 10.14 Conclusions and Future Work
  • Chapter 11 System Evaluation
  • 11.1 Summary of Key Contributions and Indicative Results
  • 11.2 Introduction
  • 11.3 Experimental Validation
  • 11.3.1 The Media Independent Preauthentication Framework
  • 11.3.2 Intratechnology Handoff
  • 11.3.3 Intertechnology Handoff
  • 11.3.4 Cross-Layer-Trigger-Assisted Preauthentication
  • 11.3.5 Mobile-Initiated Handover with 802.21 Triggers
  • 11.3.6 Network-Initiated Handover with 802.21 Triggers
  • 11.3.7 Handover Preparation Time
  • 11.4 Handoff Optimization in IP Multimedia Subsystem
  • 11.4.1 Nonoptimized Handoff Mode
  • 11.4.2 Optimization with Reactive Context Transfer
  • 11.4.3 Optimization with Proactive Security Context Transfer
  • 11.4.4 Performance Results
  • 11.5 Systems Validation Using Petri-Net-Based Models
  • 11.5.1 MATLAB®-Based Modeling of Handoff Functions
  • 11.5.2 Petri-Net-Based Model for Optimized Security Association
  • 11.5.3 Petri-Net-Based Model for Hierarchical Binding Update
  • 11.5.4 Petri-Net-Based Model for Media Redirection of In-Flight Data
  • 11.5.5 Petri-Net-Based Model of Optimized Configuration
  • 11.5.6 Petri-Net-Based Model for Multicast Mobility
  • 11.6 Scheduling Handoff Operations
  • 11.6.1 Sequential Scheduling
  • 11.6.2 Concurrent Scheduling
  • 11.6.3 Proactive Scheduling
  • 11.7 Verification of Systems Performance
  • 11.7.1 Cycle-Time-Based Approach
  • 11.7.2 Using the Floyd Algorithm
  • 11.8 Petri-Net-Based Modeling for Multi-Interface Mobility
  • 11.8.1 Multihoming Scenario
  • 11.8.2 Break-Before-Make Scenario
  • 11.8.3 Make-Before-Break Scenario
  • 11.8.4 MATLAB®-Based Petri Net Modeling for Multi-Interface Mobility
  • 11.9 Deadlocks in Handoff Scheduling
  • 11.9.1 Handoff Schedules with Deadlocks
  • 11.9.2 Deadlock Prevention and Avoidance in Handoff Schedules
  • 11.10 Analysis of Level of Concurrency and Resources
  • 11.11 Trade-off Analysis for Proactive Handoff
  • 11.12 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 12 Conclusions
  • 12.1 General Principles of Mobility Optimization
  • 12.2 Summary of Contributions
  • 12.3 Future Work
  • A RDF Schema for Application Layer Discovery
  • A.1 Schema Primitives
  • B Definitions of Mobility-Related Terms
  • References
  • Index
"It is a recommended resource for graduate students, researchers, and IT professionals interested in the study of handoff management." (IEEE Communications Magazine, 1 April 2015)

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