Agricultural Medicine

Rural Occupational and Environmental Health, Safety, and Prevention
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • 2. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 24. März 2016
  • |
  • 600 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-64721-9 (ISBN)
 
Newly updated, Agricultural Medicine: Rural Occupational Health, Safety, and Prevention, Second Editionis a groundbreaking and comprehensive textbook and reference for students and practitioners of public health, and professionals in the field of rural agricultural occupational health and safety. The book introduces specific occupational and environmental health and safety issues faced by agricultural workers and rural residents, and provides a roadmap to establishing sustainable worker and public health support in agricultural communities.
Responding to reader demand, Agricultural Medicine, Second Edition now features more case studies, key point summaries, and new international perspective chapters comparing North American health and agricultural practices to those in Europe, the Asia Pacific, and South America.
Agricultural health and safety engages a multidisciplinary team of medical professionals, veterinarians, safety professionals, engineers, sociologists, epidemiologists, and psychologists, for whom this book serves as an essential resource.
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • About the Reviewers
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 Introduction and Overview
  • 1.1 Introduction to the Professional Specialty of Agricultural Medicine (Agricultural Safety and Health)
  • 1.2 Terminology and Definitions
  • 1.3 What is an Agricultural Health and Safety Professional?
  • 1.3.1 The Primary Care Physician, Nurse, Allied Health Professionals, and Veterinary Practitioners
  • 1.3.2 The Full-time Agricultural Health and Safety Specialist
  • 1.4 Training of Agricultural Health Practitioners and Agriculture Health and Safety Specialists
  • 1.4.1 Training for Healthcare Practitioners
  • 1.4.2 Training Full-time Agriculture Health and Safety Specialists
  • 1.5 Demographics of the Agricultural Workforce
  • 1.6 The Evolution of Production Agricultural, Workforce, and Types of Farms
  • 1.6.1 Family Farms
  • 1.6.2 Principal Operator
  • 1.6.3 Farm Family Members
  • 1.6.4 Farm Workers
  • 1.6.5 Indigenous Farm Workers
  • 1.6.6 Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers
  • 1.6.7 Large Farms and Industrial-style Farms
  • 1.6.8 Family Corporations
  • 1.7 Other Occupations Exposed to the Agricultural Environment
  • 1.8 General Health Status of the Agricultural Population
  • 1.9 Occupational Health Status of the Agricultural Workforce
  • 1.10 Occupational Injury and Illness Statistics
  • 1.11 Persistent and Emerging Megatrends in Agriculture: Health-Safety Implications
  • 1.12 A Preview of Specific Occupational Health and Safety Risks and Conditions
  • 1.12.1 Special Risk Populations in Agriculture (Chapter 2)
  • 1.12.2 Agricultural Respiratory Conditions (Chapter 3)
  • 1.12.3 Agricultural Skin Diseases (Chapter 4)
  • 1.12.4 Cancer in Agricultural Populations (Chapter 5)
  • 1.12.5 Toxicology of Pesticides (Chapter 6)
  • 1.12.6 General Environmental Health Hazards in Agriculture (Chapter 7)
  • 1.12.7 Musculoskeletal Diseases in Agriculture (Chapter 8)
  • 1.12.8 Physical Factors Affecting Health (Chapter 9)
  • 1.12.9 Mental, Social, and Behavioral Health in Agriculture (Chapter 10)
  • 1.12.10 Acute Agricultural Injuries (Chapter 11)
  • 1.12.11 Human Health Hazards of Veterinary Pharmaceuticals (Chapter 12)
  • 1.12.12 Agricultural and Rural Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases (Chapter 13)
  • 1.12.13 Prevention of Illness and Injury in Agricultural Populations (Chapter 15)
  • 1.12.14 Agricultural Health and Safety Organizations
  • 1.13 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Special Risk Populations in Agricultural Communities
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Women in Agriculture
  • 2.2.1 Work Exposures/Risk Factors for Farm Women
  • 2.2.2 Prevention
  • 2.3 Youths in Agriculture
  • 2.3.1 Work Exposures/Risks Factors
  • 2.3.2 Prevention
  • 2.3.3 Going Beyond Awareness-level Education Aimed at Farm Youths
  • 2.4 Elderly Farmers
  • 2.4.1 Work Exposures/Risks
  • 2.4.2 Recommendations for Prevention
  • 2.5 Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers
  • 2.5.1 Work Exposures/Risks
  • 2.5.2 Prevention and Protection of MSFWs
  • 2.6 Old-order Anabaptists
  • 2.6.1 Work Exposures/Risks
  • 2.6.2 Effects and Special Considerations for Treatment of Injuries
  • 2.6.3 Other General Health Concerns
  • 2.6.4 Recommendations for Prevention
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Agricultural Respiratory Diseases
  • 3.1 Introduction and Overview
  • 3.1.1 Introduction to Respiratory Hazards in Agriculture
  • 3.1.2 Respiratory Responses to Inhaled Agricultural Substances
  • 3.2 Agricultural Structures and Respiratory Hazards
  • 3.2.1 Introduction
  • 3.2.2 Feed Grain, Silage, and Other Commodity-storage Structures
  • 3.2.3 Fruit and Root Storage Structures
  • 3.2.4 Livestock and Poultry Housing and Processing Plants
  • 3.2.5 Sheep and Dairy Cattle Housing
  • 3.2.6 Conventional Chicken Coops
  • 3.2.7 Poultry- and Meat-Processing Plants
  • 3.2.8 Equipment and Supply Buildings on Farms
  • 3.3 Agricultural Dusts
  • 3.3.1 Introduction
  • 3.3.2 Mechanisms of Agricultural Dust Toxicity
  • 3.3.3 Occupational Respiratory Diseases and Conditions Caused by Agricultural Dust Exposures
  • 3.3.4 Risk Variables for Agricultural Dust-related Respiratory Diseases
  • 3.3.5 Clinical Aspects of Agricultural Dust-related Respiratory Diseases
  • 3.4 Confined Animal Feeding Operations and Respiratory Disease Hazards
  • 3.4.1 Introduction
  • 3.4.2 What Toxic Dusts and Gases are found in Confinement Houses?
  • 3.4.3 Who is Exposed to CAFO Dusts and Gases, and When?
  • 3.4.4 How Commonly Does Excessive Exposure Occur?
  • 3.4.5 Respiratory Effects of Inhaling Confinement House Dusts and Gases
  • 3.4.6 Diagnosis
  • 3.4.7 Treatment
  • 3.5 Oxides of Nitrogen ("Silo Gas")
  • 3.5.1 Introduction
  • 3.5.2 Oxides of Nitrogen on the Farm
  • 3.5.3 When are Farmers Exposed to NOx?
  • 3.5.4 How is NOx Detected?
  • 3.5.5 How Common are Farmer Exposures to NOx?
  • 3.5.6 Respiratory Effects of Oxides of Nitrogen
  • 3.5.7 Diagnosis
  • 3.5.8 Treatment
  • 3.5.9 Prevention of Silo Filler's Disease
  • 3.6 Applied Agricultural Chemicals
  • 3.6.1 Prevention of Agricultural Chemical-induced Respiratory Problems
  • 3.7 Zoonotic Infections Causing Respiratory Disease
  • 3.8 General Preventive Measures for Agricultural Respiratory Illnesses
  • 3.8.1 General Strategies for Prevention of Agricultural Dust-induced Illnesses
  • 3.8.2 Emission Control
  • 3.8.3 Work Environment Air-quality Assessment
  • 3.8.4 Remove Dust from the Air
  • 3.8.5 Use of Respirators
  • 3.8.6 Reassign Jobs to Protect Vulnerable Individuals
  • 3.8.7 Education of Owner/Operators and Workers
  • 3.8.8 Medical Monitoring
  • 3.8.9 Smoking Cessation
  • 3.8.10 Prevention of Occupational Illnesses in CAFO-exposed Workers
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Agricultural Skin Diseases
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.3 Clinical Picture of Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.4 Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.5 Agents causing Contact Dermatitis in Agricultural Settings
  • 4.5.1 Pesticide-induced Dermatitis
  • 4.5.2 Other Chemicals Related to Dermatitis
  • 4.5.3 Animal-related Skin Dermatitis
  • 4.5.4 Plant-induced Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.5.5 Treatment of Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.5.6 Prevention of Contact Dermatitis
  • 4.6 Infectious Dermatitis
  • 4.7 Arthropod-induced Dermatitis
  • 4.7.1 Hymenoptera Stings (Bees and Wasps)
  • 4.7.2 Arachnids (Mites and Spiders)
  • 4.7.3 Spiders
  • 4.7.4 Scorpions
  • 4.7.5 Lepidoptera Species (Catapillars)
  • 4.7.6 Treatment of Arthropod Dermatoses
  • 4.8 Sunlight-induced Dermatoses
  • 4.8.1 Acute Sun-induced Skin Disorders
  • 4.8.2 Chronic Sun-induced Skin Disorders
  • 4.8.3 Skin Cancer
  • 4.8.4 Prevention of Sun-induced Skin Disorders
  • 4.9 Skin Disorders Related to Heat, Cold, and Humidity
  • 4.9.1 Heat-induced Dermatoses
  • 4.9.2 Cold-related Skin Disorders
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Cancer in Agricultural Populations
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.1.1 Epidemiology of Cancer in Farm Populations
  • 5.1.2 Trends
  • 5.1.3 Mechanisms of Causation: Protective Factors and Risk Factors
  • 5.1.4 Mechanisms of Cancer Causation
  • 5.1.5 Known and Potential Cancer Agents in Farming Populations
  • 5.1.6 Animal Exposures as Possible Cancer Hazards
  • 5.1.7 Pesticides as Potential Carcinogens
  • 5.1.8 Details of Epidemiology and Agricultural Risk Factors for Specific Cancer Types
  • 5.1.9 Cancer in Special Agricultural Populations
  • 5.1.10 Social Medicine Aspects of Cancers in Farmers
  • 5.1.11 Prevention of Cancer in Farm Populations
  • 15.2 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Health Effects of Agricultural Pesticides
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Definition of Pesticides
  • 6.3 History and Risk Communication
  • 6.4 Pesticides: Classes, Subclasses, and Relative Toxicity
  • 6.5 How Farmers, Agricultural Workers, and Agriculture-associated Workers are Exposed to Pesticides
  • 6.6 The Risk of Pesticide Poisonings
  • 6.7 Insecticides: Usage, Acute Toxicity Mechanisms, Diagnosis, and Treatment
  • 6.7.1 Organochlorines
  • 6.7.2 Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Acute OCL Poisoning
  • 6.7.3 Diagnostic Aids for OCL Exposures
  • 6.7.4 General Principles of Pesticide-poisoning Treatment
  • 6.7.5 Specific Treatment of OCL Poisoning
  • 6.7.6 Cholinesterase-inhibiting Insecticides (Organophosphates and Carbamates)
  • 6.7.7 Acute Symptoms of OP and CB Toxicity
  • 6.7.8 Diagnostic Aids for OP and CB Poisoning
  • 6.7.9 Treatment of OP and CB Poisoning
  • 6.7.10 Pyrethrum, Pyrethrin, and Pyrethroid Insecticides
  • 6.7.11 Treatment of Acute Toxicity with Pyrethroid Insecticides
  • 6.7.12 Neonicotinoid Insecticides
  • 6.7.13 Biological Insecticides
  • 6.7.14 Other Insecticides
  • 6.8 Herbicides: Usage, Acute Toxic Mechanisms, Diagnosis, and Treatment
  • 6.8.1 Phenolic Compounds
  • 6.8.2 Chlorophenoxy Compounds
  • 6.8.3 Arsenicals
  • 6.8.4 Dipyridils (paraquat and diquat)
  • 6.8.5 Organonitrogens
  • 6.8.6 Phtalic Acid Herbicides
  • 6.8.7 Propenal
  • 6.8.8 Triazines
  • 6.8.9 Phosphonates (e.g., glyphosate)
  • 6.9 Fumigants: Usage, Acute Toxic Mechanisms and Treatment
  • 6.10 Chronic Health Effects of Insecticides, Herbicides, and Fumigants
  • 6.11 General Strategies for the Prevention of Pesticide Poisoning
  • 6.11.1 Avoidance, Proper Storage, and Separation
  • 6.11.2 Regulations and Enforcement
  • 6.11.3 Hygienic Work Practices
  • 6.11.4 Personal Protective Equipment
  • 6.11.5 Medical Monitoring
  • 6.11.6 Training
  • 6.12 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 7 General Environmental Hazards in Agriculture Communities
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Water Quality
  • 7.2.1 Introduction
  • 7.3 Substance Sources and Health Effects of Water Pollution from Agricultural Operations
  • 7.3.1 Animal Wastes and Inorganic Fertilizers
  • 7.3.2 Nitrates: Sources and Environmental Fate
  • 7.3.3 Nitrates: Health Effects
  • 7.3.4 Phosphorus: Sources and Fate
  • 7.3.5 Phosphorus: Health Effects
  • 7.3.6 Soil Particles
  • 7.3.7 Trace Elements
  • 7.3.8 Infectious Microbes in Water
  • 7.3.9 Health Effects of Infectious Microbes in Water
  • 7.3.10 Veterinary Pharmaceuticals
  • 7.3.11 Health Hazards of Veterinary Pharmaceuticals in Surface Drinking Waters
  • 7.3.12 Pesticides
  • 7.3.13 Health Effects of Pesticides in Water
  • 7.3.14 Water Pollutants from Urban Sources
  • 7.3.15 Possible Health Effects of Chlorine in Drinking Water
  • 7.3.16 Water Pollutants from Rural Industrial Sources
  • 7.3.17 Ground Water Pollution from Drainage Wells and Other Non-agricultural Industries
  • 7.3.18 Water Pollutants from Inappropriate Land Management
  • 7.3.19 Water Pollutants from Natural Sources
  • 7.3.20 Health Effects of Hard Water
  • 7.4 Prevention of the Adverse Health Effects of Water Pollution
  • 7.5 Air Quality in Rural Agricultural Environments
  • 7.5.1 Introduction
  • 7.5.2 Air Pollution from Livestock and Crop Operations
  • 7.5.3 Fate of Emissions and Atmospheric Effects
  • 7.5.4 Particulate Air Contaminants in Rural Areas
  • 7.5.5 Odors
  • 7.5.6 Microbes
  • 7.5.7 Endotoxin and Glucans
  • 7.5.8 Antibiotics
  • 7.5.9 Air Pollution from Agricultural Chemicals
  • 7.5.10 Rural Industry
  • 7.5.11 Control
  • 7.6 Solid Waste Concerns in Rural Agricultural Areas
  • 7.7 Animal Feeding Operations
  • 7.7.1 Introduction
  • 7.7.2 Air Quality Concerns from CAFOs
  • 7.7.3 Odors and Odorants
  • 7.7.4 Physical Health
  • 7.7.5 Behavioral and Social Health
  • 7.7.6 Extra-toxic Mechanisms
  • 7.7.7 The Somatasization of Adverse Odors
  • 7.8 Global Climate Change: Effects on Agricultural Production and the Environment
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.1.1 Definitions
  • 8.1.2 Work-related Disorders
  • 8.1.3 Epidemiology
  • 8.2 Chronic Pain Conditions
  • 8.3 Injuries of the Neck
  • 8.3.1 Cervical Degenerative Disk Disease
  • 8.3.2 Neck Tension Syndrome
  • 8.3.3 Whiplash Injury
  • 8.4 Injuries of the Spine
  • 8.4.1 Spinal Degenerative Disk Disease
  • 8.4.2 Spinal Stenosis
  • 8.4.3 Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis
  • 8.4.4 Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • 8.4.5 Coccygodynia
  • 8.4.6 Low Back Pain
  • 8.5 Injuries of the Shoulder
  • 8.5.1 Impingement Syndrome or Shoulder Tendonitis
  • 8.5.2 Shoulder Dislocations
  • 8.5.3 Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • 8.5.4 Frozen Shoulder
  • 8.5.5 Osteoarthritis of the Acromioclavicular Joint
  • 8.5.6 Cervicobrachial Syndrome
  • 8.6 Injuries of the Elbow, Wrist and Hand
  • 8.6.1 Epicondylitis
  • 8.6.2 Olecranon Bursitis
  • 8.6.3 Flexor Pronator Syndrome
  • 8.6.4 De Quervain´s Tenosynovitis
  • 8.6.5 Ulnar Nerve Entrapment or Compression
  • 8.6.6 Trigger Finger
  • 8.6.7 Fractures and Nonunion of the Scaphoid
  • 8.6.8 Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • 8.6.9 Dupuytren's Contracture
  • 8.6.10 Ganglion
  • 8.6.11 Herbeden-Bochards Osteoarthritis
  • 8.6.12 Osteoarthritis of the First Carpometacarpal Joint
  • 8.7 Injuries of the Hip
  • 8.7.1 Trochanteritis
  • 8.7.2 Osteoarthritis of the Hip
  • 8.8 Injuries of the Knee, Ankle, and Foot
  • 8.8.1 Knee Ligament Injuries
  • 8.8.2 Bursitis of the Knee
  • 8.8.3 Chondromalacia Patellae
  • 8.8.4 Injuries of the Meniscus
  • 8.8.5 Baker's Cyst
  • 8.8.6 Osteoarthritis of the Knee
  • 8.8.7 Ankle Sprains
  • 8.9 General Disorders, Infections, and Reactive Arthritis
  • 8.9.1 Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
  • 8.9.2 Reactive Arthritis
  • 8.10 Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • 8.11 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Physical Factors
  • Noise and Hearing Loss
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Noise, Definitions, and Measurements
  • 9.3 How Noise Affects the Auditory System
  • 9.4 Symptoms and Disablement
  • 9.5 Tinnitus
  • 9.6 Hearing Loss due to Trauma or Toxins
  • 9.7 Audiometry
  • 9.8 Other Effects of Noise
  • 9.9 Prevention
  • 9.9.1 Definition of Noise Emissions
  • 9.9.2 Engineering Controls
  • 9.9.3 Enclose the Noise Source
  • 9.9.4 Administrative Controls
  • 9.9.5 Worker Education
  • 9.9.6 Hearing Protection Devices
  • Vibration and Injuries Related to Vibration
  • 9.10 Introduction
  • 9.11 Hand-arm Vibration Syndrome
  • 9.11.1 Vibration White Finger
  • 9.11.2 Diffusely Distributed Neuropathy
  • 9.11.3 Pain in Hand and Arm
  • 9.11.4 Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • 9.11.5 Other Effects of Vibration
  • 9.11.6 Diagnosis and Prevention of HAVS
  • 9.12 Whole-body Vibration
  • 9.13 Disorders due to Heat and Cold
  • 9.14 Human Thermal Balance
  • 9.15 Disorders due to Heat
  • 9.15.1 Heat Cramps
  • 9.15.2 Heat Exhaustion
  • 9.15.3 Heat Syncope
  • 9.15.4 Heat Stroke
  • 9.15.5 Skin Disorders Related to Heat
  • 9.15.6 Nephrolithiasis and Hot Environment
  • 9.15.7 Infertility
  • 9.16 Disorders Related to Cold
  • 9.16.1 Systemic Hypothermia
  • 9.16.2 Localized Hypothermia
  • 9.17 Climate and Physical and Mental Capability
  • 9.18 Prevention of Injuries Related to Heat and Cold
  • 9.19 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Psychosocial Conditions in Agriculture
  • 10.1 Introduction and Background
  • 10.1.1 From Peasant to Entrepreneur
  • 10.1.2 Farming in a Changing World
  • 10.2 Stress and Stress-related Health Disorders
  • 10.2.1 Sources of Stress
  • 10.3 Stress Physiology
  • 10.3.1 The Nervous System and Stress
  • 10.3.2 The Endocrine System and Stress
  • 10.3.3 Acute and Chronic Stress
  • 10.4 Chronic Stress-related Physiological Reactions
  • 10.4.1 High Blood Pressure
  • 10.4.2 Dyslipidemia
  • 10.4.3 Abdominal Obesity
  • 10.4.4 Insulin Resistance
  • 10.4.5 Mental Effects
  • 10.4.6 Immunological Reactions
  • 10.5 Stress and Disease
  • 10.5.1 Cardiovascular Disease
  • 10.5.2 Mental Disorders
  • 10.5.3 Other Diseases/Disorders
  • 10.6 Measuring Stress
  • 10.6.1 Laboratory Methods
  • 10.6.2 Psychological Individual Methods
  • 10.6.3 Screening for Stress on an Organizational Level
  • 10.7 Management and Prevention of Stress Reactions
  • 10.7.1 Individual Therapeutic Methods
  • 10.7.2 Family, Neighbors, and Community
  • 10.7.3 Stress and Workers' Compensation
  • 10.8 Alcohol-related Health Problems
  • 10.9 Suicides and Suicide Prevention
  • 10.10 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Acute Injuries in Agriculture
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Agricultural Injury Statistics and Epidemiology
  • 11.2.1 Fatal Agricultural Injuries: Statistics
  • 11.2.2 Non-fatal Agricultural Injuries
  • 11.3 Medical Considerations of Acute Agricultural Injuries
  • 11.4 First on the Scene/First Aid
  • 11.4.1 General Considerations
  • 11.4.2 Designate a Leader
  • 11.4.3 Assign a Specific Person to Call for Help
  • 11.4.4 Assess the Rescue Situation
  • 11.4.5 Establish a Hazard Zone
  • 11.4.6 Provide Emergency First Aid
  • 11.4.7 Stay Calm
  • 11.4.8 Preserve Tissues if Amputation Occurs
  • 11.4.9 Decide to Call Immediately for Assistance, or Administer First Aid
  • 11.4.10 General First-aid Supplies
  • 11.5 First Responders and Emergency Medical Treatment, Rescue/Extrication, and Transport
  • 11.5.1 Training
  • 11.5.2 Other Special Considerations of Farm Rescue
  • 11.6 Emergency Room
  • 11.7 Primary Care
  • 11.8 Secondary/Tertiary Care
  • 11.9 Rehabilitation
  • 11.10 Hazards and Injury Scenarios
  • 11.10.1 Tractors and All-terrain Vehicle Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.2 Skid-steer Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.3 Other Self-propelled Machinery Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.4 PTO-powered Implement Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.5 Auger Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.6 Livestock
  • 11.10.7 Farmstead: Grain, Silage, and Manure Storage (confined space) Injury Incidents
  • 11.10.8 Other Farmstead Injury Incidents
  • 11.11 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Veterinary Pharmaceuticals: Potential Occupational and Community Health Hazards
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Background and Overview
  • 12.3 Veterinary Biologicals
  • 12.3.1 Introduction and Overview
  • 12.3.2 Needle-stick Exposure Risks
  • 12.3.3 Symptoms, Clinical Signs, and Pathogenesis of Unintended Exposures to Animal Biologicals
  • 12.3.4 Treatment of Humans Exposed to Biologicals
  • 12.4 Antibiotics
  • 12.4.1 Introduction and Overview
  • 12.4.2 Occupational Health Exposure Risks
  • 12.4.3 Antibiotic-resistant Organisms
  • 12.4.4 How do Resistant Organisms Disseminate Among the Human Population?
  • 12.4.5 Treatment of Antibiotic-resistant Infections in Farm Patients
  • 12.4.6 Prevention of Occupational Health Risks from use of Veterinary Pharmaceuticals
  • 12.5 Hormones used for Growth Promotion
  • 12.5.1 Introduction
  • 12.5.2 Estrogenic Hormones
  • 12.5.3 Growth Hormone
  • 12.5.4 Anabolic Steroids
  • 12.6 Other Growth Promotors
  • 12.7 Hormones used in Veterinary Obstetrics
  • 12.7.1 Introduction
  • 12.7.2 Oxytocin
  • 12.7.3 Prostaglandins
  • 12.8 Other Human Health Considerations of Veterinary Pharmaceuticals
  • 12.9 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Zoonotic Diseases: Overview of Occupational Hazards in Agriculture
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Significance of Zoonotic Disease
  • 13.3 Forces Affecting Trends and Patterns of Zoonoses
  • 13.4 Historical Trends in Zoonoses
  • 13.4.1 Emerging and Re-emerging Zoonotic Diseases
  • 13.5 Future Trends in Zoonoses
  • 13.6 General Epidemiologic Considerations of Zoonoses
  • 13.7 Classification of Zoonotic Infections
  • 13.8 Prevention
  • 13.9 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 14 International Agricultural Safety and Health
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • Section A Agricultural Medicine in South America - The Mercosur 4: Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay
  • 14.1A Introduction
  • 14.2A Types of Production and Processes
  • 14.3A Culture and Demographics
  • 14.4A The Demography of those Engaged in Agricultural Production
  • 14.5A Agricultural Injury and Illness Statistics: the Current Status of the Health and Safety of Agricultural Populations
  • 14.5.1A Injuries and Illnesses in Farming Populations: Argentina
  • 14.6A Support Professionals in Agriculture
  • 14.7A Injuries and Illnesses in Farming Populations: Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil
  • 14.8A Resources and Organizations in the M4
  • 14.8.1A Agricultural Medicine in Argentina and Brazil
  • 14.9A Special/unique Illness or Injury Conditions
  • 14.9.1A Argentina Hemorrhagic Fever
  • 14.9.2A Urban-rural Conflict
  • 14.9.3A Health and Safety of FarmYouths
  • 14.9.4A Farm Machinery and its Influence in Rural Accidents
  • 14.10A Summary
  • References
  • Section B Agricultural Medicine in Australiaand New Zealand
  • 14.1B Introduction
  • 14.2B Differences in Types of Agricultural Systems
  • 14.3B Working Characteristics
  • 14.4B Agricultural Injuries and Illnesses
  • 14.5B Occupational Health and Safety Legislation
  • 14.6B Skin Cancer
  • 14.7B Agricultural Health and Safety Resources
  • 14.8B Conclusion
  • References
  • Section C Agricultural Medicine in: The European Community
  • 14.1C Introduction
  • 14.2C Diversification of Agricultural Production in Europe
  • 14.3C Differences in Types of Commodity Production and Processes Relative to North America
  • 14.4C Differences in the Culture of the Workers
  • 14.5C Differences in Agricultural Injury and Illness Statistics
  • 14.6C Differences in Health and Safety Regulations
  • 14.7C Differences in Resources for Agricultural Medicine
  • 14.8C Special/unique Agricultural Illness or Injury Conditions
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Prevention of Illness and Injury in Agriculture
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Barriers to Prevention Intervention
  • 15.2.1 Small Family Farms
  • 15.2.2 Large Farms with More Than 10 Workers
  • 15.3 A Hierarchy of Prevention Modalities
  • 15.3.1 Eliminate the Hazard or Minimize and Control Risk
  • 15.3.2 Regulation and Enforcement
  • 15.3.3 Education and Training for Safe and Healthful Behavior
  • 15.3.4 Application of Personal Protective Equipment
  • 15.4 Specialized Health and Safety Disciplines
  • 15.4.1 Safety Professions
  • 15.5 Multimodal Interventions
  • 15.5.1 Farm Health Programs in Finland and Norway
  • 15.6 Respiratory Disease Prevention in Swine Confinement Workers
  • 15.6.1 AgriSafe and Certified Safe Farm Programs in America
  • 15.7 Sustainable Farm Families in Australia
  • 15.7.1 Farm Safety Programs Without Wellness Components
  • 15.8 Farm-based Wellness Program
  • 15.9 Developing Comprehensive Prevention Programs
  • 15.10 Iowa Model of Integrated Multimodal Prevention Interventions
  • 15.11 Education to Facilitate Behavior Change
  • 15.12 Removal of Farm Health and Safety Hazards
  • 15.13 Development of Total Worker Health
  • 15.14 Summary
  • Appendix A Principles of Appropriate Selection of Personal Protective Equipment
  • 15.1A Respiratory Protective Equipment (Respirators)
  • 15.1.1A Types of Respirators
  • 15.1.2A NIOSH Certification and Protection Factor Designation
  • 15.1.3A Terminology for the Type of Respirator
  • 15.1.4A Proper Fitting of a Respirator
  • 15.1.5A Medical Evaluation for Fitness to Wear Respirators
  • 15.1.6A Respirator Protection Program
  • 15.2A Hearing Protection
  • 15.3A Protective Eyewear
  • 15.4A Protective Clothing
  • 15.5A Welding Protective Gear
  • 15.6A Chainsaw Protective Gear
  • References
  • Index
  • Supplemental Images
  • EULA

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.

Inhalt (PDF)

Download (sofort verfügbar)

88,99 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok