Advances in Design for Inclusion

Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Design for Inclusion, July 17-21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA
 
 
Springer (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 10. Juni 2017
  • |
  • XIII, 528 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-319-60597-5 (ISBN)
 

This book addresses a range of topics in design, such as universal design, design for all, digital inclusion, universal usability, and accessibility of technologies regardless of people's age, financial situation, education, geographic location, culture and language. It especially focuses on accessibility for people with auditory, cognitive, neurological, and visual impairments, ageing populations, and mobility for those with special physical needs.

The book explores some of the overlaps between inclusive design and web accessibility to help managers, designers, developers, policy makers, and researchers optimize their efforts in these areas. Based on the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Design for Inclusion, held on July 17-21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California, USA, it discusses new design technologies and highlights the disparate needs of the individuals within a community. Thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book represents a useful resource for readers with various backgrounds, providing them a timely, practice-oriented guide to design for inclusion.

1st ed. 2018
  • Englisch
  • Cham
  • |
  • Schweiz
Springer International Publishing
  • 100 farbige Tabellen, 220 s/w Abbildungen
  • |
  • 220 schwarz-weiße Abbildungen, 100 farbige Tabellen, Bibliographie
  • 72,43 MB
978-3-319-60597-5 (9783319605975)
10.1007/978-3-319-60597-5
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt

Giuseppe Di Bucchianico

Born in Pescara in 1967, he is an architect, with a Masters in Ergonomics and Ph.D in technological and design innovation Culture (2001).

He has had teaching assignments at the University of Roma-La Sapienza, Politecnico di Milano, Palermo, Florence and Chieti-Pescara, where he currently teaches Design 2. She has participated in numerous national research related to the design of the application fields.
Conducts research mainly in the field of relationships and synergies between Design and Ergonomics, ie the relations between individuals, artifacts and environments for the development of a user-centered approach to type design, themes with which he has participated in numerous national conferences and International. The application areas were those of the industrial product and in particular the nautical design and, recently, the Design for All and ergonomics for sustainable development.
He has won numerous competitions and international architectural awards ( "subversive insertions" Use Institute in Verona) and design ( "Design Plus 2007", ISH Frankfurt). Professionally he has studied in Design, collaborating with numerous companies (including Gattocucine, Valcucine, Foster, Abis, Tecnolam), exposing at important exhibitions and events in Milan, Verona, Brussels, Moscow, Paris, Frankfurt, New York, receiving reviews in prestigious magazines.
It is representative of the Agency SDI (Italian Design System) of Chieti to the Assembly of the Territorial Delegation of the National Council for Design Research. As part of the IEA (International Ergonomics Association), he is co-Chair of the International Technical Subcommittee "Ergonomics and Design for Sustainability".

Pete Kercher

Pete Kercher graduated in law in the UK then worked in international youth politics (Vice-President, European Federation of Liberal and Radical Youth, 1975-77). Moving to Italy in 1978, he established a communications and design consulting agency, now KSDC Strategic Design and Communications.

Executive Officer of BEDA in 1988-94, he then represented Italy on its Board of Directors until 2002.
A founder member of EIDD - Design for All Europe in 1993 (President in 2003-7) and of its national counterpart Design for All Italy (President 1997-99), he is currently EIDD's roving Ambassador. As President of EIDD, he focused on critical mass in terms of membership, of academic credibility (the definitive EIDD Stockholm Declaration© 2004) and of taking the message about Design for All out into the real world of business and public administration, both by targeting the European Commission, other international agencies and major international organisations operating in the private sector and by devising a cycle of major annual conferences: Culture for All (2005), Work for All (2006) and Tourism for All (2007).
He writes articles and manifestos for political, legal and design publications, chairs and addresses conferences, seminars, symposia and workshops all over Europe and the rest of the world and acts as consultant to many international projects, also serving as a member of the Group of Experts in Design at OHIM (now EUIPO) throughout its existence (2002-2008).

  • Intro
  • Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2017
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • Design Driven Social Innovation: Methodology and Training
  • Challenges to Teaching Empathy in Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Design Projects
  • 3 Empathy Exercise
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Improvements and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Design for All. The Increasing Dissemination of Teaching Experiences
  • Abstract
  • 1 The Different Design for Inclusion Approaches to Tackle the Global Socio-demographic Phenomena
  • 1.1 Universal Design: An Expression of the Anglo-Saxon Pragmatism
  • 1.2 Inclusive Design: Design with Attention to Diversity
  • 1.3 Design for All: Participation and Process
  • 2 The Strategic and Training Value of DfAapproach
  • 3 Some DfA Teaching Experience
  • 3.1 Bathing: Tourism for All_Design Lab "Balneabile"
  • 3.2 Shopping: Shopping for All_Design Lab "the Natural Shopping Center"
  • 3.3 Shopping: Shopping Experience for All_Master Degree Thesis
  • 3.4 Fitness: Fitness for All_Design Lab "Well-Being and Social Relations"
  • 3.5 Signage: Hospital Signage for All_Master Degree Thesis
  • 3.6 Preparation of Food and Drink: Food for All_"Tutti a Tavola" Project
  • 3.7 Gardening: Green for All_Design Lab "Green for All"
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • An Exploration of Designer-to-User Relationship from a Care-Orientated Perspective
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 An Ideal Care Relationship Between Designers and Users
  • 2.1 The Meaning of Care
  • 2.2 An Ideal Care Relationship Between Designers and Users
  • 3 Designers' View on Designer-User Relationship
  • 3.1 Research Method
  • 3.2 Interview Questions
  • 4 Findings and Discussion
  • 4.1 Knowing: The Interpretation of Care
  • 4.2 Doing: The Means of Designers Caring for Users
  • 4.3 Knowing: User Perceives Care from Designers
  • 4.4 Doing: Users Care for Others
  • 5 Insights and Reflections
  • 5.1 An Inquiry into the User-Centered Design
  • 5.2 Designers' Knowing as a Key Link
  • 5.3 Care Begins from Communication
  • 6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Building a Tool for Multisensory Storytelling Through DfA
  • Abstract
  • 1 Evaluating the Possibility to Build a Multisensory Tool
  • 2 The 11 Tests on Sound
  • 2.1 The First Four Tests
  • 2.2 Tests from 5 to 11
  • 3 Conclusions: The Framework for the Next Steps
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • The Business Opportunity of Longevity
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Background
  • 2.1 Ageing Marketing and the Engagement of the Marketers Community
  • 3 Addressing Consumer Needs. Analysis of Ageing Marketing Policies Implemented by Companies Involved in Delivering Services or Products
  • 4 New Policies Can Be Implemented by Organization, Creating an Age-Friendly Strategy
  • 4.1 Physiological Ageing as Factor to Improve Business Performances
  • 4.2 Conclusions. Developing an Age-Friendly Marketing Strategy as a Precondition to Get a Competitive Advantage
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Advances in Design for Ageing Population
  • Adaptive Design of Physical, Hand-Operated Interfaces for the Transgenerational User Using Parameter ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Age-Appropriate Adaptive Human-Machine Interaction
  • 3 Adaptive Design Parameters
  • 3.1 Identification of Quantifiable Design Parameters
  • 3.2 Assessment Towards an Adaptive Design
  • 4 Preliminary User Evaluation of Potential Adaptive Control Variants
  • 4.1 Fine Motor Adjustment Task
  • 4.2 Forceful Gross Motor Task
  • 5 Outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • IoT Based Recipes for Enabling Senior Citizens: Stakeholders Views on How Integration of IoT and Web ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 State of the Art - Background
  • 2.1 Smart Technologies and Interactive Devices
  • 2.2 Web-Based Services for Automating Tasks
  • 3 Research Methodology
  • 4 Results: Recipes for Enabling Senior Citizens
  • 5 Conclusions and Future Works
  • References
  • Design for the Active Ageing and Autonomy: The Role of Industrial Design in the Development of the " ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Habitat Project
  • 3 General Objectives
  • 4 Methodological Process
  • 5 Expected Results
  • 6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Inclusive Design for Ageing People and the Internet of Things: Understanding Needs
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Supported Thesis
  • 3 Case Study
  • 4 Methodological Process
  • 5 Results
  • 6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Exploring Fashion Choice Criteria for Older Chinese Female Consumers: A Wardrobe Study Approach
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Using Visual Data
  • 3 Wardrobe Study Approaches
  • 4 Method Applied in This Study
  • 5 Results
  • 5.1 Dressing Preferences
  • 5.2 Fabric
  • 5.3 Colour, Print and Embellishment
  • 5.4 Silhouette and Garment Construction
  • 6 Discussion
  • References
  • Qualitative Study on Salient Factors Influencing Indian Elderly's Perception on Fall and Its Related ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Participant Selection
  • 2.2 Interview Procedure
  • 2.3 Data Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Redeveloping Game Set for Living Alone Elderly with Dementia Using Participatory Action Research App ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Dementia
  • 3 Universal Design
  • 4 Elderly Living Alone
  • 5 Participant Observation
  • 6 Semi-structured Interview
  • 7 Participatory Action Research
  • 8 Discussion
  • 9 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Initiative for Improving Medical Instruction Communication with Elderly Hearing Impaired Patients at ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Observations
  • References
  • Inclusive Products and Service Design
  • Designing to Include Judges and Inner-City Tenants
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 2.1 Participants
  • 2.2 Testing Logistics
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 3.1 Getting the Content Right
  • 3.2 Making the Form Usable for Plaintiffs
  • 3.3 Keeping the Form Usable for Plaintiffs While Meeting the Needs of Judges and Law Clerks
  • 3.4 Getting Approval from the Courts
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Designing Autonomy in Cars: A Survey and Two Focus Groups on Driving Habits of an Inclusive User Group, and Group Attitudes Towards Autonomous Cars
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Work
  • 2.1 User views
  • 2.2 Inclusiveness
  • 3 Survey
  • 3.1 Description
  • 3.2 Results
  • 4 Focus Groups
  • 4.1 Description
  • 4.2 Results
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Study on the Control Device Layout of Truck Cockpit Based on User Experience
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Test Method
  • 2.1 The Test Platform and Equipment
  • 2.2 Subjects
  • 2.3 Test Scheme
  • 2.4 Test Process
  • 3 Processing Method
  • 3.1 Calculation Methods for Control Units with Dip Angle Adjustment
  • 3.2 Calculation Methods for Control Units Without Dip Angle Adjustment
  • 4 Test Results
  • 4.1 The Most Comfortable Position and Angle of the Seat
  • 4.2 The Diameter of the Steering Wheel and the Angle of Control Components
  • 4.3 The Most Comfortable Position of Each Control Component
  • 5 Conclusion and Prospects
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • The Effect of Display-Control Compatibility Design of Intelligent Electric Rice Cooker on Different ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Design
  • 2.2 Subjects
  • 2.3 Material and Apparatus
  • 2.4 Procedure
  • 2.5 Indicator
  • 2.6 Statistic Analysis
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Task Completion Rate
  • 3.2 Task Error Rate
  • 3.3 Operation Satisfaction
  • 3.4 Operation Time
  • 3.5 EEG Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Analysis of Design of Washbasin for Use by the Elderly
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experimental Methods
  • 3 Preliminary Experiment on Posture
  • 3.1 Method of Experiment
  • 3.2 Results
  • 3.3 Discussion on Preliminary Experiment
  • 4 Experiment on Spout Height
  • 4.1 Purpose of the Experiment
  • 4.2 Method of the Experiment
  • 4.3 Results
  • 4.4 Discussion
  • 5 Experiment on Optimal Height of Bowl
  • 5.1 Purpose of the Experiment
  • 5.2 Experimental Procedure
  • 5.3 Results
  • 5.4 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Inclusion in Sharing-Based Services (I-SBS): An Analytical Tool
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Sharing-Based Contexts and Services
  • 1.2 Inclusion and Exclusion in the Sharing-Based Services
  • 2 Methodological Approach
  • 2.1 Collecting Examples
  • 2.2 Designing the Tool
  • 2.3 The Workshop Series
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 The I-SBS Toolkit
  • 3.2 The I-SBS Tool: An Analytical Tool
  • 3.3 Design Workshops Series: A Qualitative Evaluation Technique
  • 3.4 Design Workshop Results
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Universal Design of User Interfaces in Self-driving Cars
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction and Background
  • 2 Challenges
  • 2.1 Acceptance of Self-driving Cars
  • 2.2 Multimodal In-car Interaction
  • 3 Proposing a Model for Universal In-car Interaction Design
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusion
  • References
  • Real-Time Cognitive Load Measurement for Dynamic Modality Selection Using Eye-Tracking Methods
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Problem Statement
  • 2.1 Research Questions
  • 3 Research Objectives
  • 4 Research Method
  • 5 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Smart Tech, Web and Media for All
  • Recommendations for Age-Appropriate Mobile Application Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methods
  • 3 Recommendations
  • 3.1 Touch, Gesture, Speech Control, and Other Forms of Control
  • 3.2 Clarity and Layout
  • 3.3 User Guidance and Navigation
  • 3.4 Text and Language
  • 3.5 Graphics, Animation, and Multimedia
  • 3.6 Links
  • 3.7 Searching, Filtering, and Sorting
  • 3.8 Consistency and Robustness
  • 3.9 Support Functions
  • 3.10 Registration and Forms
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Mobile Technologies Used as Communication Support System for People with Intellectual Disabilities: ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Research Context
  • 2 Objectives
  • 3 Method
  • 3.1 Participants
  • 3.2 Procedure
  • 3.3 Analyses
  • 4 Results
  • 4.1 Profile of the Users and of the Communication Objectives
  • 4.2 Observed Changes Following the Introduction of the Tablet
  • 5 Discussion
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Design and Smart Technologies for Physical Activity as Key Factors in Promoting Quality of Life and ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodological Approach
  • 2.1 Physical Activity and Wellness: The Investigative Phase
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 The Design Orienting Scenario for a System-Product for Wellbeing and Health
  • 3.2 The Digital Wellness Hub
  • 3.3 The Digital Wellness Hub Results
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusion
  • References
  • Technological Study of Brazilian Government Websites
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Paper Preparation
  • 2.1 Size of the Brazilian Web
  • 2.2 Language of Brazilian Web Pages
  • 2.3 Geographical Location of Servers
  • 2.4 Webpages Which Adhere to W3C Standards
  • 2.5 Webpages Which Adhere to E-Mag Standards
  • 3 Results
  • References
  • A Diversity Functionalities Project. Development of Inclusive Wearable Products
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 2.1 Characteristics of the User
  • 2.2 Characteristics of the Product
  • 2.3 Characteristics of the Context of Use
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Information Phase
  • 3.2 Formalization Phase
  • 4 Design Phase Results
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Assessment of Users' Impressions of Mobile Devices' Vibrations and How Such Impressions Affect the R ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 PANAS (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule)
  • 3 Preliminary Experiments
  • 3.1 Experiment Results
  • 4 Experiment
  • 4.1 Experiment 1: Investigation on the Influence of Vibration Pattern Components on the Impression C ...
  • 4.2 Experiment 1: Influence of the Combination of Vibration Pattern Component on Impressions Conveye ...
  • 4.3 Influence of Vibration Pattern on Information Impression
  • 5 Future Prospects and Issues
  • 6 Future Tasks
  • 7 Supplementary Notes
  • References
  • Design for Inclusion in the Living Environment
  • Comfort in the Indoor Environment: A Theoretical Framework Linking Energy Efficiency and Universal D ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction - Why Talk About Comfort?
  • 2 Comfort in Literature
  • 3 Comfort from Residents' Perspective
  • 3.1 Study 1 - Include 2015 Workshop
  • 3.2 Study 2
  • 3.3 Study 3 - Students
  • 3.4 Discussion of Studies
  • 4 A Framework for Linking EE and UD
  • 4.1 Comfort Indicators
  • 4.2 A Framework for Comfort in the Indoor Environment
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Opportunities for Inclusive Play in Densely Populated Cities: An Analysis of the Human Factors in Ho ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Inclusive Playgrounds in Hong Kong
  • 2.1 Overview of Playgrounds in Hong Kong
  • 2.2 The Selected Playground: Quarry Bay Park Children's Playground
  • 3 Evaluation of Inclusiveness for Play Space
  • 3.1 Aspects of Evaluation
  • 3.2 Tools
  • 3.3 Inclusiveness of the Selected Playground: Findings and Discussion
  • 4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Study on Wall Colors Which Constitute a Comfortable Interior for the Elderly
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experiment
  • 2.1 Method of Experiment
  • 2.2 Subject
  • 2.3 Samples of Wallcolors
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Experimental Results of Psychological Evaluation
  • 3.2 Experimental Results of Heartrate Measurement
  • 3.3 Salivary Amylase Measurement
  • 4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Urban Furniture's Chromatic Planning Methodology: Bucelas, a Case Study
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Color Visibility and Legibility
  • 2.1 Inherent and Perceived Color
  • 2.2 Color Interactions
  • 3 Color and Orientation
  • 4 Urban Furniture
  • 5 Methodology for Urban Furniture Chromatic Plans
  • 6 Case Study Characterization
  • 7 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Toward Inclusive Public Transportation: Rights, not Privileges
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Rights of Access to Buildings
  • 3 Rights of Access to Public Transportation
  • 4 Fundamental Principles of Public Transportation
  • 5 How to Cope with Already Existing Infrastructures
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Design and Evaluation Method for Living Function Resilient Equipment Based on Daily Living Systems S ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Development of Daily Behavior Descriptor for Daily Living Systems
  • 3 Development of Robotic Arm for Cooking Support
  • 4 Evaluation of Robotic Arm for Cooking Support
  • 5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Adaptive Technologies for Users with Changing Abilities. Towards Autonomy, Independence and Inclusion
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Capabilities and Needs
  • 2.1 Anthropometric Measurements
  • 2.2 Ergonomic Measurements
  • 2.3 Evaluations of Gestures
  • 3 Tools and Criteria
  • References
  • Ergonomics and Inclusive Service Design: Exploring Possibilities for Its Application in a Developing ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Method
  • 2.1 Overview
  • 2.2 Participants
  • 2.3 Materials
  • 3 Results
  • 3.1 Usefulness of the Inclusive Service Design Approach
  • 3.2 Participants' Views on the Barriers and Enablers for Using the Approach to the Service Improvement
  • 4 Discussion and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Inclusive and Universal Design in Clothing, Footwear and Accessories
  • Sports-Wear in Wheelchair Rugby: Establishing Design Needs
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Anthropometric Data Collection of Portuguese Children with Overweight and Obesity
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology Stages
  • 3 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Clothing Comfort for the Dependent Elderly - Caregivers Perspective
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology Used
  • 3 Analyses of the the Results of the Survey
  • 3.1 Question 1
  • 3.2 Question 2
  • 3.3 Question 3
  • 3.4 Question 4
  • 3.5 Question 5
  • 3.6 Question 6
  • 4 Buttons Design
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Haute Couture and Ergonomics
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Haute Couture is Still Haute Couture
  • 3 Haute Couture and the Method
  • 3.1 Choosing the Model
  • 3.2 Adaptation of the Model
  • 3.3 Fitting
  • 4 The Role of Human Factors in Haute Couture
  • 4.1 Quality
  • 4.2 Comfort
  • 4.3 Aesthetics
  • 4.4 Psychological/Cognitive Ergonomics
  • 5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Main Characteristics and Anthropometrics of People with Down Syndrome - Impact in Garment Design
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 State of the Art
  • 3 Experimental Procedure
  • 3.1 Methods and Procedures
  • 3.2 Sample
  • 4 Results and Discussion
  • 4.1 3D Images Generated by the KBI 3D Body Scanner
  • 4.2 Comparative Body Analysis
  • 4.3 Table Measurements Results
  • 4.4 Comparative Graphs
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Design for Users With Disabilities
  • Inclusive Design of Educational Environment for Diverse People
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Inclusive/Universal Design/Design for All
  • 3 Objectives of the UNIALL Project
  • 4 Methodology
  • 5 Results of the Accessibility Monitoring and Evaluation of Higher Education Institutions in Slovakia
  • 6 Framework for National Strategies and Action Plans
  • 7 Further Activities of the UNIALL Project
  • 8 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Teaching an Innovative E-learning Design Program for Visually Impaired Students
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Visually Impaired Students
  • 2.1 Barriers of Visually Impaired Students
  • 3 Methodology
  • 3.1 The Experimental Teaching Program
  • 3.2 E-Learning Program for the Visually Impaired
  • 3.3 Physical and Virtual Classrooms
  • 3.4 Distant Laboratory
  • 3.5 Available Program
  • 3.6 Teaching Supports
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Future Teaching Aids
  • 6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Analysis of Primary Caregiver to Prevent Ergonomic Risks When Transferring a Person with Motor Disab ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Problematic and Challenges of a Caregiver in Its Daily Life, His Tasks, His Physical, Emotiona ...
  • 3 Development of a Tool to Evaluate Primary Caregiver's Risks
  • 4 Posture, Support Base, and Center of Gravity
  • 5 Primary Caregivers Risks
  • 6 State of Art in Transferring Equipment for Patients with Motor Disabilities
  • 6.1 Assisted Mobility Aids
  • 6.2 Primary Caregiver Assisted Mobility Aids
  • 6.3 Primary Caregiver Lifting Aids
  • 7 Postural Evaluation: Primary Caregiver vs Specialized Caregiver
  • 8 Conclusions and Recommendations
  • References
  • Three-Dimensional Tactile Images for Blind People: A Proposition for a Translating Model of Static Two-Dimensional Images
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Blindness and Assistive Technology
  • 3 Tactile Images
  • 4 3D Printing
  • 4.1 3D Printing Tactile Images
  • 5 Proposition of the Translating Model
  • 5.1 Tabulation of Data
  • 5.2 Translating Model
  • 6 Final Considerations
  • References
  • A Hybrid Approach Based on Multi-sensory Stimulation Rooms, Robotic Assistants and Ontologies to Pro ...
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Related Work
  • 3 General System Architecture
  • 3.1 ASD Knowledge Modeling Through Ontologies
  • 3.2 Robotic Assistant
  • 3.3 Multi-sensory Stimulation Room
  • 4 Experiment and Results
  • 5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • A Survey on Innovative Refreshable Braille Display Technologies
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Specifications of the Braille Code
  • 3 Piezo Actuators
  • 4 Electromagnetic Linear Actuators
  • 5 Electro Active Polymers Actuators
  • 6 Electro Rheological Actuators
  • 7 Thermo-pneumatic and Shape Memory Alloy Actuators
  • 8 Discussions and Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Airport Infrastructures and Satisfaction of Passengers with Reduced Mobility: The Human-System Integration and the Constraint of the Users
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Methodology
  • 3 Literature Review
  • 3.1 Accessibility in Brazilian Airports
  • 3.2 The Physical Disabilities, in Numbers
  • 3.3 Passengers Embarkation
  • 3.4 Human-Systems Integration (HSI)
  • 4 Development
  • 4.1 The Reduced Mobility, Around the World
  • 5 Analysis and Results
  • 6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Digital Inclusion Trajectory of People with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Study
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Communication and Interpersonal Relations
  • 1.2 Commuting
  • 1.3 At Home
  • 1.4 Entertainment
  • 1.5 Work
  • 2 Objectives and Method
  • 2.1 Preliminary Phase - Development of the TASA Program to Promote the Use of Technology in Support ...
  • 2.2 Program Assessment
  • 2.3 Data Collection Tools
  • 3 Results
  • 4 Discussion
  • References
  • Pressure Ulcer Prevention System Based in Capacitive Sensors
  • Abstract
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Materials and Methods
  • 3 Results and Discussion
  • 4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Author Index

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Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

287,83 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

287,83 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen