Smart Bandage Technologies

Design and Application
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 29. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 276 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-803846-8 (ISBN)
 

Smart Bandage Technology: Design and Application is a guide to the integration of sensors and electronic systems into bandages for the application of wound management. Davis provides a comprehensive guide to the design and development of functional material for wound management for engineers of all levels possessing core knowledge in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science.

Includes an introduction to the design of advanced wound care technologies for undergraduate engineers, as well as a coherent exploration of competing technologies suitable for postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers. Each section provides a high level overview of the concepts and techniques involved in developing smart bandages, including their manufacturing, operation, and implementation, and also exposes and explores the most recent approaches to wound care in more detail.

This book incorporates contextual boxes to provide a greater degree of detail to examples given and also includes an extensive bibliography for those seeking to research further on the various topics discussed.


  • Combines physiological aspects of wound healing with sensor engineering aspects of smart bandages
  • Provides an up-to-date overview of research initiatives in this field which are building the foundation for the next generation of medical textiles
  • Learn how to design, develop, and integrate 'smart systems' with materials for wound management
  • incorporates contextual boxes to provide a greater degree of detail to examples given and also includes an extensive bibliography for those seeking to research further on the various topics discussed


James Davis is Professor of Biomedical Sensors and Course Director for the BSc Biomedical Engineering degree stream at the University of Ulster. He has authored over 120 peer reviewed publications and has an extensive publication and grant funding record on functional materials for wound management and associated diagnostics.
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 19,08 MB
978-0-12-803846-8 (9780128038468)
0128038462 (0128038462)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Dedication
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Chapter One - Introduction to Wound Management
  • 1.1 - Introduction
  • 1.2 - Wounds: Acute and Chronic
  • 1.2.1 - Pressure Ulcers
  • 1.2.2 - Venous Leg Ulcers
  • 1.2.3 - Diabetic Foot Ulceration
  • 1.3 - Wound Healing
  • 1.3.1 - Inflammation
  • 1.3.2 - Proliferation
  • 1.3.3 - Tissue Remodeling
  • 1.4 - Wound Management Strategies
  • 1.4.1 - Scoring Systems
  • 1.4.2 - TIME Framework and Wound Bed Preparation
  • 1.4.3 - Wound Diagnostics
  • 1.5 - Wound Treatment Technologies
  • 1.5.1 - Skin Grafts and Engineered Tissues
  • 1.5.2 - Negative Pressure Wound Therapy
  • 1.5.3 - Oxygen Therapies
  • 1.5.4 - Electrostimulatory Techniques
  • 1.5.5 - Ultrasound Technologies
  • 1.6 - Wound Infection
  • 1.7 - Health Costs
  • 1.8 - Future Strategies and Technological Solutions
  • References
  • Chapter Two - Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Assessment, Treatment, and Management
  • 2.1 - Introduction
  • 2.2 - Normal Wound Healing
  • 2.2.1 - Stage 1: The Inflammatory Phase
  • 2.2.2 - Growth Factors
  • 2.2.3 - Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
  • 2.2.4 - Epidermal Growth Factor
  • 2.2.5 - Transforming Growth Factor
  • 2.2.6 - Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
  • 2.2.7 - Insulin-Like Growth Factor
  • 2.2.8 - Fibroblast Growth Factor
  • 2.2.9 - Stage 2: Proliferative Phase
  • 2.2.10 - Stage 3: Remodeling Phase
  • 2.3 - The Chronic Wound
  • 2.3.1 - Diabetes and Wound Chronicity
  • 2.4 - Growth Factors-A Therapeutic Option for the Diabetic Foot
  • 2.5 - Infection and the Diabetic Foot
  • 2.5.1 - Causative Organisms
  • 2.6 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Three - History and Evolution of Bandages, Dressings, and Plasters
  • 3.1 - Introduction
  • 3.2 - Bandage, Dressing, or Plaster?
  • 3.2.1 - Flax and Linen
  • 3.2.2 - Lint and Charpie
  • 3.2.3 - New Directions for Flax Linen
  • 3.2.4 - Cotton Bandages
  • 3.2.5 - Elastic Bandages
  • 3.3 - Dressings
  • 3.3.1 - Egyptian Wound Management
  • 3.3.2 - Asian Influences
  • 3.3.3 - Hippocrates and Greek Medicine
  • 3.4 - Plasters
  • 3.4.1 - Adhesive (Sticking Plasters)
  • 3.4.2 - Baynton Plaster
  • 3.4.3 - Belladona Plaster
  • 3.4.4 - Isinglass/Ladies Sticking Plaster
  • 3.4.5 - Rubber Adhesive Plaster
  • 3.5 - Band-Aid Discovery and Commercialization
  • 3.6 Wound Packing
  • 3.7 - Field Dressing-Necessity and Invention
  • 3.8 - Winter's Revolution in Wound Management
  • 3.9 - The Ideal Dressing
  • 3.10 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Four - Passive and Interactive Dressing Materials
  • 4.1 - Introduction
  • 4.2 - Dressing Design
  • 4.2.1 - Hydrocolloids
  • 4.2.2 - Hydrogels
  • 4.2.3 - Foams
  • 4.2.4 - Films
  • 4.2.5 - Dressing Selection-Practical Application
  • 4.3 - Polymeric Wound Dressings Overview
  • 4.4 - DFU Dressings Based on Natural Polymers
  • 4.4.1 - Chitin and Chitosan
  • 4.4.2 - Hyaluronic Acid and Other Glycosaminoglycans
  • 4.4.3 - Cellulose and Its Derivatives
  • 4.4.4 - Alginates
  • 4.4.5 - Collagen
  • 4.4.6 - Gelatin
  • 4.4.7 - Fibrin
  • 4.4.8 - Silk Fibroin
  • 4.4.9 - Dextran
  • 4.4.10 - Elastin
  • 4.5 - DFU Dressings Based on Synthetic Polymers
  • 4.5.1 - Poly(Vinyl Alcohol)
  • 4.5.2 - Poly(Ethylene Glycol)/Poly(Ethylene Oxide)
  • 4.5.3 - Poly(Vinyl Pyrrolidone)
  • 4.5.4 - Polyurethanes
  • 4.5.5 - Poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)
  • 4.5.6 - Poly (a-Esters) (PLA, PGA, PLGA, PCL)
  • 4.5.7 - Silicones
  • 4.6 - Honey
  • 4.7 - Electrospun Dressings
  • 4.7.1 - Standard Electrospun Processes
  • 4.7.2 - Coaxial Electrospinning
  • 4.7.3 - Electroblow-Electrospinning
  • 4.8 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Five - Wound Diagnostics and Diagnostic Dressings
  • 5.1 - Introduction
  • 5.2 - Ideal Properties and Key Challenges
  • 5.3 - Wound Fluid
  • 5.4 - Potential Biomarkers
  • 5.5 - Conventional Diagnostics
  • 5.5.1 - Core Methodologies
  • 5.5.2 - Dipstick Tests
  • 5.5.3 - Lateral Flow Diagnostics
  • 5.6 - Moving Toward Smart Dressings
  • 5.7 - Monitoring Wound pH
  • 5.8 - Colorimetric pH Systems
  • 5.8.1 - Visual pH Devices
  • 5.8.2 - Quantitative Wound pH Imaging
  • 5.8.3 - Radiofrequency Identification Optical Sensors
  • 5.9 - Electrochemical pH Systems
  • 5.9.1 - Screen-Printed Potentiometric Smart Dressings
  • 5.9.2 - Carbon Fiber pH Sensors
  • 5.9.3 - Screen-Printed Voltammetric Sensors
  • 5.9.4 - Carbon Fiber Weave Dressings
  • 5.9.5 - Carbon Composite Film Dressings
  • 5.9.6 - Peptide Redox Wires for pH Sensing
  • 5.9.7 - Reference Electrode Issues
  • 5.10 - Hydrogel Sensors
  • 5.11 - Endogenous Wound Biomarkers
  • 5.12 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Six - Sensors for Detecting and Combating Wound Infection
  • 6.1 - Introduction
  • 6.2 - Classical Signs of Wound Infection
  • 6.3 - Microbial Culture
  • 6.4 - Biofilm Formation and Complications
  • 6.5 - Instrumental Analysis Techniques
  • 6.6 - Real-Time/Point of Care Infection Diagnostics
  • 6.7 - Monitoring Bacterial Metabolites-Quorum Sensing
  • 6.7.1 - Gram-Positive Quorum Sensing
  • 6.7.2 - Gram-Negative Quorum Sensing
  • 6.8 - Bacterial Toxins-Pyocyanin
  • 6.9 - Bacterial Enzyme Expression
  • 6.10 - Pore-Forming Toxins-Unilamellar Vesicles
  • 6.11 - Cephalosporin-Modified Dressings
  • 6.12 - Immune Response Biomarkers
  • 6.12.1 - Detection of Human Neutrophil Elastase and Cathespin G
  • 6.12.2 - Detection of Lysozyme
  • 6.12.3 - Detection of Myeloperoxidase
  • 6.13 - Summary
  • References
  • Chapter Seven - Connected Health Approaches to Wound Monitoring
  • 7.1 - Introduction
  • 7.2 - The Evolution of Connected Health
  • 7.2.1 - Telemedicine, Telehealth, and Telecare
  • 7.2.2 - eHealth and mHealth
  • 7.3 - Wound-Monitoring Technology Components
  • 7.3.1 - Analogue-to-Digital Conversion
  • 7.3.2 - Signal Conditioning Stage
  • 7.3.3 - Digital Signal Processing Stage
  • 7.4 - Postprocessing Stage
  • 7.4.1 - Patient Alerts
  • 7.4.2 - Data Storage
  • 7.4.3 - Transmission of Data/Alerts
  • 7.5 - Architectures for Connect Health Approaches to Wound Monitoring
  • 7.5.1 - Bluetooth
  • 7.5.2 - Wi-Fi
  • 7.5.3 - Bluetooth Low Energy
  • 7.6 - Wound-Monitoring Communication Architectures
  • 7.6.1 - Personal Area Networks
  • 7.6.2 - Body Area Network
  • 7.6.3 - Patient Unit/Bandage Electronics
  • 7.6.4 - Smartphone Component
  • 7.6.5 - Internet Aspect
  • 7.6.6 - Constraints
  • 7.7 - Summary
  • References
  • Glossary
  • Subject Index
  • Back cover

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