The Palgrave Handbook of Global Citizenship and Education

 
 
Palgrave MacMillan (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Januar 2018
  • |
  • 658 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-137-59733-5 (ISBN)
 

This Handbook is a much needed international reference work, written by leading writers in the field of global citizenship and education. It is based on the most recent research and practice from across the world, with the 'Geographically-Based Overviews' section providing summaries of global citizenship and education provided for Southern Africa, Australasia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, Latin America, and East and South East Asia.

The Handbook discusses, in the 'Key Ideologies' section, the philosophies that influence the meaning of global citizenship and education, including neo-liberalism and global capitalism; nationalism and internationalism; and issues of post-colonialism, indigeneity, and transnationalism. Next, the 'Key Concepts' section explores the ideas that underpin debates about global citizenship and education, with particular attention paid to issues of justice, equity, diversity, identity, and sustainable development. With these key concepts in place, the 'Principal Perspectives and Contexts' section turns to exploring global citizenship and education from a wide variety of viewpoints, including economic, political, cultural, moral, environmental, spiritual and religious, as well as taking into consideration issues of ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and social class. Finally, the 'Key Issues in the Teaching of Global Citizenship' section discusses how education can be provided through school subjects and study abroad programmes, as well as through other means including social media and online assessment, and political activism.

This Handbook will be vital reading for academics, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates in the fields of sociology and education, particularly those with an interest in comparative studies.



Ian Davies is Professor of Education at the University of York, UK.

Li-Ching Ho is Assistant Professor of Social Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.

Dina Kiwan is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Media Studies, at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon.

Carla L. Peck is Associate Professor of Social Studies Education in the Department of Elementary Education at the University of Alberta, Canada.

Andrew Peterson is Professor of Civic and Moral Education at Canterbury Christ Church University, UK.

Edda Sant is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.

Yusef Waghid is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy of Education at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.

  • Englisch
  • London
  • |
  • Großbritannien
  • 10,30 MB
978-1-137-59733-5 (9781137597335)
113759733x (113759733x)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Intro
  • Contents
  • Editors and Contributors
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Editorsâ?? Introduction
  • Part I Geographically-Based Overviews
  • Chapter 1 Global Citizenship Education in Australasia
  • Introduction and Overview
  • The Political, Economic and Social Contexts
  • Education Systems and Curricula
  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • Summary: The â??Globalâ?? in Australasian Curricula
  • Teaching and Learning Approaches
  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • Conclusion: Possible Futures
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Europe and Global Citizenship
  • Introduction and Overview
  • Historical Background
  • Contemporary Social and Political Context
  • Key Features of the Current Education System in Europe
  • Strategies for Educating About and for Global Citizenship
  • The Colonial Legacy
  • Emerging Themes of Global Citizenship
  • The European Unionâ??s Contribution
  • Likely and Desirable Futures
  • References
  • Chapter 3 The Middle East
  • Introduction and Overview of the Chapter
  • Historical Background
  • Contemporary Social, Political and Cultural Context
  • Key Features of the Current Education System Within Particular Locations
  • What Particular Strategies (Curricular and Other) Are Used for Educating About and for Global Citizenship
  • Likely and Desirable Futures
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Global Citizenship Education in North America
  • Introduction
  • Social, Political, and Cultural Contexts
  • Canada
  • United States
  • Mexico
  • Historical Background of GCE
  • Key Features of Global Citizenship Education
  • Momentum Toward a Critical Approach to GCE: Engaging the Realities of the Twenty-first Century
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Global Citizenship Education in Latin America
  • Introduction
  • Historical and Political Context
  • Contemporary Social and Political Context
  • Key Features of Current Education Systems
  • Strategies for Educating About and for Global Citizenship
  • Citizenship
  • Globalization
  • Global (and Other) Citizenships
  • Desirable Futures
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Conceptions of Global Citizenship Education in East and Southeast Asia
  • Introduction
  • Historical, Political, Economic, and Social Contexts
  • Appropriation of Globalization for Nationalist Economic Goals
  • (Re)Defining National Identity: Inclusion or Exclusion
  • Educational Contexts and Global Citizenship Education
  • General Trends: Increasing Focus on Global Citizenship Education
  • Human Rights Education as a Strong Discourse
  • Global Competitiveness and National Pride as a Strong Discourse
  • Conclusion and Future Directions
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Global Citizenship Education: A Southern African Perspective
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings and Some Theoretical and Practical Predicaments
  • Implications of a Value-Based Democratic Citizenship Education for Global Citizenship Education
  • Conclusion and Recommendations for Future Research
  • References
  • Part II Ideologies
  • Chapter 8 Global Citizenship Education and Globalism
  • Introduction: The Ideology of Social Inclusion
  • Conceptual Underpinnings: Deconstructing the Ideology of Social Inclusion
  • Social Inclusion as Achievement of Modern State Societies
  • Trajectories of the Social Sciences Discourse
  • Adult Educationâ??s Mandate: Education for Allâ??and Especially for Some
  • Key Issues and Debates
  • â??Technologies of the Selfâ?? (Foucault): Subjectivation as Self-governance of the Citizen
  • Professional Rationalities for Meeting Needs of the Citizen
  • Disruptions: Adult Education, Disability/Ability and Citizenship
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Living Together with National Border Lines and Nationalisms
  • Introduction
  • Confusion Around Nationalism
  • Nationalisms in Multinational and Transnational Contexts
  • Okinawa: History and Debate
  • Nationalisms at the Domestic Level: Japan and Okinawa
  • Nationalisms Between States: US and Japan
  • Nationalisms at the International Level: America and Okinawa
  • Not that Simple
  • Amerasians in Okinawa
  • Nationalism and Amerasians
  • Education for Connecting People
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Internationalism in Global Citizenship and Education
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings of the Theme of the Chapter
  • An Internationalist Perspective on Intercultural Citizenship
  • Key Issues/Debates
  • Critical Theory and Critical Rationality in Global Citizenship
  • Critical Citizenship Education Before Global Citizenship Education
  • Collective Identity, Political Agency and the Public Sphere
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Policy Implications
  • Curriculum Implications
  • Teaching and Learning Implications
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Transnationalism in Education: Theoretical Discussions and the Implications for Teaching Global Citizenship Education
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings of Transnationalism
  • Transnationalism as a Socio-Constructionist Perspective
  • Transnationalism as a Social Field Theory
  • Reformulation of the Concept of Social in Minor Transnationalism
  • Key Issues: Reconsidering Global Citizenship
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion and Recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Why Cosmopolitanism Needs Rethinking
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings
  • Key Issues/Debates
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Global Citizenship Education, Postcolonial Identities, and a Moral Imagination
  • Introduction
  • Understanding Global Citizenship Education
  • Postcolonial Contexts and Identities
  • Global Citizenship Education and Postcolonial Identities: On Finding a Common Language?
  • On Re-Imagining Postcolonialist Identities
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Indigeneity and Global Citizenship Education: A Critical Epistemological Reflection
  • Introduction
  • The Universal and Local Construction of Knowledge, and Indigeneity
  • Bruno Latour and the Extension of Local Practices
  • Latour and the Demystification of Universal and Local Forms of Knowledge
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Part III Key Concepts
  • Chapter 15 Justice and Global Citizenship Education
  • Economic Justice
  • Recognition Justice
  • Democratic Justice
  • Conclusions: Common Struggles and the Promise of Justice
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Global Citizenship and Equity: Cracking the Code and Finding Decolonial Possibility
  • Introduction and Context for Global Citizenship Education
  • A Global Equity and Justice Framework for GCE
  • Global Citizenship and Poverty
  • Global Citizenship, Misrecognition, and the Abyssal Line of Colonialism
  • Cognitive Justice as a Response to the Abyssal Line of Colonialism
  • Global Social Justice and Cognitive Justice as the Foundation of Global Citizenship Education
  • The Classroom as a Fractal of the World
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Diversity, Global Citizenship and the Culturally Responsive School
  • Introduction
  • Introducing Diversity Secondary College
  • The School Context and Philosophy
  • Citizenship/Global Citizenship Education
  • Commentary: Towards a Theory of the Culturally Responsive School
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Identity, Belonging and Diversity in Education for Global Citizenship: Multiplying, Intersecting, Transforming, and Engaging Lived Realities
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings
  • Discourse and discursive fields: EfGC and Critical Scholarship
  • Intersecting Discourses: Identity, Belonging, Global Citizenship and Intersectionality
  • Key issues/debates
  • Citizenship and Identity: Belonging to the Imagined Nation
  • National Identity as Contested
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship: Research and Practice
  • Conclusions and Recommendations for Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 19 Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship Education: Challenging Imperatives
  • Introduction
  • Early Uses
  • Worldwide Attention
  • Conceptual Underpinnings of Sustainable Development
  • Three Pillars
  • Key Issues/Debates
  • Contested Meaning
  • Balancing Priorities
  • Commitment
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • ESD and Global Citizenship
  • Challenges
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Part IV Principal Perspectives and Contexts
  • Chapter 20 Economy and Economics
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings
  • Multi-perspective Approach
  • Meanings of Globalisation
  • Controversy on Globalisation
  • Empirical Evidence of Globalisation
  • Key Issues and Debates of Economic Globalisation
  • Basic Models of International Trade
  • Financial Markets and Globalisation
  • Economics Shapes the Economy
  • National Economies and Governments in Times of Globalisation
  • Political Debate and Globalisation Policies
  • Some Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Politics, Global Citizenship and Implications for Education
  • Introduction
  • Conceptualizing Global Citizenship in the Politics Literature
  • Key Issues and Debates
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 22 Culture and Citizenship
  • Introduction
  • Culture, Citizenship, and the Nation-State
  • Culture and Shared Identities
  • Citizenship, Diversity, and Equality
  • Culture, Citizenship, and Globalization
  • Individual Identities and the Limits of Diversity
  • Cosmopolitanism and Global Cultures
  • New Global Hegemonies
  • Implications for Global Citizenship and Education
  • Individualizing and Integrating Cultural Citizenship
  • Sustaining Culture Through Pedagogy and Curriculum
  • Critiquing Culture and Citizenship
  • Directions for Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 23 Morality
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Underpinnings
  • Key Issues and Debates
  • Reflective Morality
  • Ethics of Care
  • Cosmopolitanism
  • Conclusion: Recommendations and Implications for Global Citizenship
  • References
  • Chapter 24 Transformative Spirituality and Citizenship
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Themes: The Uneasy Alliance Between Religion and Citizenship
  • Religion and Spirituality as Orientalism
  • Critical Debates: Neoliberal Turns on Citizenship, Religion, and Spirituality
  • Critical Spirituality
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 25 Race, National Exclusion, and the Implications for Global Citizenship Education
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Framework: Transnationalism and Cultural Citizenship
  • Latina Youth and Cultural Citizenship
  • Citizenship Means Opportunity and Racialized Vulnerability
  • Citizenship Means Flexibility
  • Citizenship Means Critique
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • Future Lines of Inquiry
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 26 Gender, Sexuality and Global Citizenship Education: Addressing the Role of Higher Education in Tackling Sexual Harassment and Violence
  • Conceptual Underpinnings
  • What Is Global Citizenship Education?
  • Global Citizenship, Gender Equality and Higher Education
  • Key Issues and Debates
  • Violence Against Women: A Key Issue for Global Citizenship (and Higher) Education
  • Gender-Based Harassment and Violence in Higher Education in the UK
  • Institutional Awareness and Attitudes to Gender-Based Violence
  • Implications for Education for Global Citizenship
  • University Approaches to Tackling Sexual Harassment and Violence
  • Conclusion and Recommendations for Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 27 Migration and Implications for Global Citizenship Education: Tensions and Perspectives
  • Introduction
  • Migration and Global Citizenship Education Through a Postcolonial Frame
  • Key Issues Related to Global Citizenship Education and Migration
  • Implications for Global Citizenship Education
  • Conclusion and Recommendations Regarding Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 28 Social Class
  • Introduction
  • Classical Theories of Social Class
  • Citizenship and Social Class
  • Contemporary Debates About Social Class
  • Social Mobility
  • Political Engagement
  • Death, Resurrection and the â??Cultural Turnâ??
  • Education, Social Class and Global Citizenship
  • Concluding Thoughts
  • References
  • Part V Key Issues in Teaching and Learning
  • Chapter 29 History Education and Global Citizenship Education
  • Introduction
  • History Education and Global Citizenship
  • Proposals for Teaching History for Global Citizenship
  • Assessment
  • Conclusion and Possible Future Research on History Education for Global Citizenship
  • References
  • Chapter 30 Global Citizenship Education and Geography
  • What is Global Citizenship Education?
  • Geography and GCE in Migration and Mobility
  • Coerced Migration
  • Flows of Resources and Power
  • Migration of Texts Through Media
  • Teaching Practices: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
  • Conclusion and Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 31 Intercultural Citizenship Education in the Language Classroom
  • Introduction
  • Language Education in Combination with Intercultural Citizenship
  • Intercultural Citizenship as Global Citizenship
  • Intercultural Citizenship Pedagogy
  • Overview of the Project
  • Project Findings
  • Identification as a Transnational Group
  • Skills Involved in Intercultural Citizenship
  • Civic Engagement
  • Conclusions and Significance of the Project
  • References
  • Chapter 32 Science Education: Educating the Citizens of the Future
  • Introduction
  • Globalization and Citizenship
  • Issues Connecting Science Education and Global Citizenship
  • Scientific Understanding for Facing Future Challenges
  • Scientific Understanding for Protection from Charlatanry
  • Avoiding Scientism
  • Complexity and Ambiguity
  • Science Education for Global Citizenship
  • Pedagogical Issues in Science Education in Relation to Global Citizenship
  • Open-ended Inquiry and Open-entry Inquiry
  • STE(A)M
  • Curricular Emphases Model
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 33 Drama Education and Global Citizenship and Education
  • Introduction
  • Connecting Citizenship Education and Drama Education
  • Exploring Drama Education for Citizenship Education
  • The Origins of Drama Education in Japan
  • The Influence of British Drama Education in Japan
  • The Effectiveness of Introducing Drama Techniques in Classes
  • Connecting Drama Education and Citizenship Education
  • Methodology of Drama Education
  • Issues Shared by Citizenship Education and Drama Education
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 34 Social Media and Youth: Implications for Global Citizenship Education
  • Introduction
  • Social Media, Civic Engagement and Citizenship Education
  • Global Citizenship
  • Defining Global Citizenship
  • Critical Reflections on Global Citizenship
  • Shaping Global Citizens: Designing the Educational Initiatives
  • Social Media as the Space for Citizenship Education
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 35 Seeking Global Citizenship Through International Experiential/Service Learning and Global Citizenship Education: Challenges of Power, Knowledge and Difference for Practitioners
  • Academic Practice of IESL and Global Citizenship Education
  • Internationalizing the University: Global Citizenship Narratives
  • The Idealized Global Citizen: Complicit in the Production of Power and Privilege?
  • Theorizing International Experiential Learning as a Practice of Global Citizenship Education
  • IESL: Practitionersâ?? Approaches to Ethical Practices
  • The Turn to Ethics: Fair Trade Learning Approaches to IESL
  • HEADS UP: Interrogating the Structures of Power and Knowledge that Produce Oppression
  • A Pedagogy of Praxis: Bringing Together Critique and Practice
  • Moving Forward: Toward Pedagogies of Survivance & Renewal
  • Works Cited
  • Chapter 36 Study Abroad and Global Citizenship: Paradoxes and Possibilities
  • Journey Outwards, Journey Inwards
  • Sense of Belonging
  • Managing Risk, Controlling Learning
  • Reproducing Privilege
  • Possibilitiesâ??Reconciling Paradoxes
  • Integrated Experiences
  • Theoretical Grounding
  • Relationships with Role Models
  • Reflective Practice
  • Provide Global Citizenship and Intercultural Competence Language and Concepts
  • Acknowledging Power and Privilege at Play in the Study Abroad Experience
  • Assessment
  • References
  • Chapter 37 Activism as/in/for Global Citizenship: Putting Un-Learning to Work Towards Educating the Future
  • Introduction
  • What Does It Mean to Un-Learn to Think Differently?
  • Education as Becoming Human
  • Why â??as/in/forâ??
  • Three Frameworks that Shape What Activism Looks Like and the Meaning and Purpose of Global Citizenship in Teaching, Learning, and Assessment
  • Deficit Model
  • Relativistâ??Pluralistâ??Neoliberal Multiculturalist Model
  • Decolonising Pedagogy
  • Conclusion and Future Research
  • References
  • Chapter 38 Global Citizenship Educationâ??Assessing the Unassessable?
  • Introduction
  • Global Citizenship Education and Assessment
  • Assessment Design as a â??Wickedâ?? Problem
  • Terminology
  • The Role of the Assessor
  • GC Assessment in Practice
  • Planning for Assessment
  • Commentary on Fig.
  • Commentary on Fig.
  • Commentary on Fig.
  • Conclusion and Future Research
  • References
  • Index

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

142,79 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen