Biotic Stress Resistance in Millets

 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. August 2016
  • |
  • 246 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-804580-0 (ISBN)
 

Biotic Stress Resistance in Millets presents an important guide to the disease and pest-related challenges of this vital food crop. Biotic stresses are one of the major constraints for millet production, but newly emerging and forward-thinking problems with disease and insect pests are likely to increase as a result of changing weather, making this an imperative book on best practices.

Current strategies are mainly through the development of resistant cultivars, as the use of chemicals is cost-prohibitive to many of those producing millet in developing countries where it is of most value as a food source. This book explores non-chemical focused options for improving plant resistance and protecting crop yield.

This single-volume reference will be important for researchers, teachers and students in the disciplines of Agricultural Entomology, Plant protection, Resistance Plant Breeding and Biotechnological pest management.


  • Establishes basic concepts of host resistance providing foundational insight
  • Synthesizes past biotic stress resistance research with the latest findings to orient research for future strategies for plant protection
  • Focuses exclusively on host plant resistance on all major diseases and pests of millets
  • Presents data and strategies that are globally applicable as millets gain importance as a health food
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 3,64 MB
978-0-12-804580-0 (9780128045800)
0128045809 (0128045809)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Biotic Stress Resistance in Millets
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • I. Introduction to Millets
  • 1 Millets, Their Importance, and Production Constraints
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.1.1 Origin and Distribution
  • 1.1.2 Area, Production, and Productivity
  • 1.2 Importance of Millets
  • 1.2.1 Dryland Agriculture
  • 1.2.2 Food and Nutritional Security
  • 1.2.3 Bioenergy Production
  • 1.2.4 Climate Resilient Agriculture
  • 1.3 Major Production Constraints
  • 1.3.1 Biotic Constraints
  • 1.3.2 Abiotic Constraints
  • 1.3.3 Socioeconomic Factors
  • 1.4 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • II. Diseases and Insect Pest Resistance
  • 2 Disease Resistance in Sorghum
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Disease, Biology, and Epidemiology
  • 2.2.1 Fungal Diseases
  • 2.2.1.1 Panicle diseases
  • 2.2.1.1.1 Grain mold
  • 2.2.1.1.2 Head blight
  • 2.2.1.1.3 Ergot
  • 2.2.1.1.4 Smuts
  • 2.2.1.2 Foliar diseases
  • 2.2.1.2.1 Anthracnose
  • 2.2.1.2.2 Downy mildew
  • 2.2.1.2.3 Rust
  • 2.2.1.2.4 Leaf blight
  • 2.2.1.2.5 Leaf spots
  • 2.2.1.3 Root and stalk diseases
  • 2.2.1.3.1 Charcoal rot
  • 2.2.1.3.2 Fusarium stalk rot
  • 2.2.2 Bacterial Diseases
  • 2.2.3 Viral Diseases
  • 2.3 Host-Plant Resistance
  • 2.3.1 Screening for Resistance
  • 2.3.1.1 Grain mold
  • 2.3.1.2 Ergot
  • 2.3.1.3 Smut
  • 2.3.1.4 Anthracnose
  • 2.3.1.5 Foliar diseases
  • 2.3.1.6 Downy mildew
  • 2.3.1.7 Charcoal rot
  • 2.3.1.8 Bacterial diseases
  • 2.3.1.9 Viral diseases
  • 2.3.2 Sources of Resistance
  • 2.3.3 Mechanisms of Resistance
  • 2.3.4 Genetics of Resistance
  • 2.3.4.1 Qualitative resistance
  • 2.3.4.2 Quantitative resistance
  • 2.3.5 Utilization of Host Resistance
  • 2.3.5.1 Conventional breeding
  • 2.3.5.2 Molecular breeding
  • 2.3.5.3 Transgenic
  • 2.4 Conclusions
  • 2.5 Future Research Need
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 3 Disease Resistance in Pearl Millet and Small Millets
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Pearl Millet
  • 3.2.1 Disease, Biology and Epidemiology
  • 3.2.1.1 Fungal diseases
  • 3.2.1.1.1 Foliar diseases
  • 3.2.1.1.2 Panicle diseases
  • 3.2.1.2 Bacterial diseases
  • 3.2.1.3 Viral diseases
  • 3.2.2 Host-Plant Resistance
  • 3.2.2.1 Screening for resistance
  • 3.2.2.2 Resistant sources and utilization
  • 3.2.2.3 Genetics of resistance
  • 3.2.2.4 Mechanisms of resistance
  • 3.3 Small Millets
  • 3.3.1 Disease, Biology and Epidemiology
  • 3.3.1.1 Fungal diseases
  • 3.3.1.1.1 Foliar diseases
  • 3.3.1.1.2 Panicle diseases
  • 3.3.1.1.3 Root and stalk diseases
  • 3.3.1.2 Bacterial diseases
  • 3.3.1.2.1 Bacterial leaf spot
  • 3.3.1.2.2 Bacterial blight
  • 3.3.1.2.3 Bacterial leaf streak
  • 3.3.1.3 Viral diseases
  • 3.3.1.3.1 Ragi severe mosaic
  • 3.3.1.3.2 Ragi mottle streak
  • 3.3.1.3.3 Ragi streak
  • 3.3.2 Host-Plant Resistance
  • 3.3.2.1 Nature of resistance
  • 3.3.2.2 Screening for resistance
  • 3.3.2.3 Resistant sources and utilization
  • 3.3.2.4 Genetics of resistance
  • 3.3.2.5 Mechanisms of resistance
  • 3.3.2.5.1 Physical basis
  • 3.3.2.5.2 Biochemical basis
  • 3.4 Conclusions
  • 3.5 Future Priorities
  • References
  • 4 Insect Pest Resistance in Sorghum
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Pest Biology
  • 4.2.1 Seedling Pests
  • 4.2.1.1 Shoot flies
  • 4.2.2 Leaf Feeders
  • 4.2.2.1 Grasshoppers
  • 4.2.2.2 Weevils
  • 4.2.2.3 Hairy caterpillars
  • 4.2.2.3.1 Red hairy caterpillar
  • 4.2.3 Borers
  • 4.2.3.1 Spotted stemborer
  • 4.2.3.2 Pink stemborer: Sesamia inferens (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera)
  • 4.2.4 Sucking Pests
  • 4.2.4.1 Shoot bugs: Peregrinus maidis (Delphacidae, Hemiptera)
  • 4.2.4.2 Aphids: Rhopalosiphum maidis, Melanaphis sacchari (Aphididae: Hemiptera)
  • 4.2.5 Panicle Pests
  • 4.2.5.1 Midges: Contarinia sorghicola (Cecidomyiidae: Diptera)
  • 4.2.5.2 Earhead bugs: Calocoris angustatus (Miridae: Hemiptera)
  • 4.2.5.3 Caterpillars
  • 4.2.6 Root Pests
  • 4.2.6.1 White grubs
  • 4.3 Host-Plant Resistance
  • 4.3.1 Host Finding and Orientation
  • 4.3.1.1 Chemical cues
  • 4.3.1.2 Visual stimuli
  • 4.3.2 Screening Techniques
  • 4.3.2.1 Shoot fly
  • 4.3.2.2 Stemborer
  • 4.3.2.3 Shoot bug
  • 4.3.2.4 Sugarcane aphid
  • 4.3.2.5 Sorghum midge
  • 4.3.2.6 Headbug
  • 4.3.3 Sources of Pest Resistance
  • 4.3.4 Genetics and Inheritance of Resistance
  • 4.3.5 Mechanism of Resistance
  • 4.3.5.1 Basic mechanisms
  • 4.3.5.1.1 Ovipositional antixenosis/nonpreference
  • 4.3.5.1.2 Antibiosis
  • 4.3.5.1.3 Tolerance/recovery resistance
  • 4.3.5.2 Factors associated with resistance
  • 4.3.5.2.1 Climatic and edaphic factors
  • 4.3.5.2.2 Morpho-physiological traits
  • 4.3.5.2.3 Biochemical factors of resistance
  • 4.3.5.2.4 Plant defense traits
  • 4.3.6 Development and Use of Pest-Resistant Cultivar
  • 4.3.6.1 Conventional breeding
  • 4.3.6.2 Marker-assisted selection
  • 4.3.6.3 Transgenics
  • 4.4 Conclusions
  • 4.5 Future Priorities
  • References
  • 5 Insect Pest Resistance in Pearl Millet and Small Millets
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Pest Biology
  • 5.2.1 Seedling Pests
  • 5.2.1.1 Shoot flies
  • 5.2.1.2 Other seedling pests
  • 5.2.2 Foliage Pests
  • 5.2.2.1 Leaf caterpillars
  • 5.2.2.2 Armyworms
  • 5.2.2.3 Grasshoppers
  • 5.2.3 Sucking Pests
  • 5.2.4 Stemborer
  • 5.2.4.1 Spotted stemborer
  • 5.2.4.2 Pink stemborer
  • 5.2.4.3 Millet stemborer
  • 5.2.5 Earhead Pests
  • 5.2.5.1 Spike worms
  • 5.2.5.2 Grain midges
  • 5.2.5.3 Head beetles
  • 5.2.5.4 Head caterpillars
  • 5.2.5.5 Head bugs
  • 5.2.5.6 Thrips
  • 5.2.5.7 Earwigs
  • 5.2.6 Soil Dwelling Insects
  • 5.2.6.1 White grubs
  • 5.3 Host-Plant Resistance
  • 5.3.1 Sources of Resistance
  • 5.3.2 Genetics of Resistance
  • 5.3.3 Mechanisms of Resistance
  • 5.3.3.1 Plant defense traits
  • 5.3.3.1.1 Antibiosis
  • 5.3.3.1.2 Nonpreference
  • 5.3.3.1.3 Tillering capacity
  • 5.3.3.1.4 Pseudo-resistance
  • 5.3.4 Utilization of Resistance
  • 5.4 Conclusions
  • 5.5 Future Priorities
  • References
  • III. Striga and Weeds
  • 6 Striga: A Persistent Problem on Millets
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Importance and Biology
  • 6.2.1 Importance
  • 6.2.2 Biology
  • 6.3 Host-Plant Resistance and Heredity
  • 6.3.1 Host Finding and Orientation: The Key Role of Strigolactones
  • 6.3.2 Sources of Resistance
  • 6.3.3 Mechanisms of Resistance
  • 6.3.4 Nature and Genetic Basis of Resistance
  • 6.3.5 Development and Use of Striga-Resistant Millet Cultivars
  • 6.3.5.1 Conventional breeding
  • 6.3.5.2 Marker-assisted selection
  • 6.3.5.3 Transgenics
  • 6.3.6 Integrated Striga Management
  • 6.4 Conclusions
  • 6.5 Future Perspectives and Priorities
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • 7 Weed Problem in Millets and Its Management
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Weeds of Millets and Their Importance
  • 7.2.1 Weeds of Millets
  • 7.2.2 Losses Due To Weeds
  • 7.2.3 Critical Period of Crop-Weed Competition
  • 7.2.4 Climate Change and Weed Competition
  • 7.3 Management Strategies
  • 7.3.1 Mechanical Methods
  • 7.3.2 Cultural Methods
  • 7.3.3 Chemical Methods
  • 7.3.4 Intercropping
  • 7.3.5 Sequence Cropping/Double Cropping
  • 7.3.6 Management of Striga spp.
  • 7.4 Herbicide Resistance
  • 7.5 Conclusions
  • 7.6 Future Thrusts
  • References
  • Index
  • Back Cover

Dateiformat: EPUB
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat EPUB ist sehr gut für Romane und Sachbücher geeignet - also für "fließenden" Text ohne komplexes Layout. Bei E-Readern oder Smartphones passt sich der Zeilen- und Seitenumbruch automatisch den kleinen Displays an. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose Software Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie bereits vor dem Download die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nicht Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Adobe-DRM wird hier ein "harter" Kopierschutz verwendet. Wenn die notwendigen Voraussetzungen nicht vorliegen, können Sie das E-Book leider nicht öffnen. Daher müssen Sie bereits vor dem Download Ihre Lese-Hardware vorbereiten.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

107,04 €
inkl. 19% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
ePUB mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
PDF mit Adobe DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
Hinweis: Die Auswahl des von Ihnen gewünschten Dateiformats und des Kopierschutzes erfolgt erst im System des E-Book Anbieters
E-Book bestellen

Unsere Web-Seiten verwenden Cookies. Mit der Nutzung dieser Web-Seiten erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden. Mehr Informationen finden Sie in unserem Datenschutzhinweis. Ok