Self or No-Self?

The Debate about Selflessness and the Sense of Self. Claremont Studies in the Philosophy of Religion, Conference 2015
 
 
Mohr Siebeck (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 30. Januar 2018
  • |
  • 361 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-16-155355-4 (ISBN)
 
Religious, philosophical, and theological views on the self vary widely. For some the self is seen as the center of human personhood, the ultimate bearer of personal identity and the core mystery of human existence. For others the self is a grammatical error and the sense of self an existential and epistemic delusion. Buddhists contrast the Western understanding of the self as a function of the mind that helps us to organize our experiences to their view of no-self by distinguishing between no-self and not-self or between a solid or 'metaphysical' self that is an illusion and an experiential or psychological self that is not. There may be processes of 'selfing', but there is no permanent self. In Western psychology, philosophy, and theology, on the other hand, the term 'self' is often used as a noun that refers not to the performance of an activity or to a material body per se but rather to a (gendered) organism that represents the presence of something distinct from its materiality. Is this a defensible insight or a misleading representation of human experience? We are aware of ourselves in the first-person manner of our ipse -identity that cannot fully be spelled out in objectifying terms, but we also know ourselves in the third-person manner of our idem -identity, the objectified self-reference to a publicly available entity. This volume documents a critical and constructive debate between critics and defenders of the self or of the no-self that explores the intercultural dimensions of this important topic.
  • Englisch
  • Tübingen
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  • Deutschland
  • 2,57 MB
978-3-16-155355-4 (9783161553554)
3161553551 (3161553551)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Cover [Seite 1]
2 - Preface [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 8]
4 - Ingolf U. Dalferth: Introduction: The Debate about Self and Selflessness [Seite 12]
5 - I. The Making of the Self through Language [Seite 18]
5.1 - Ingolf U. Dalferth: Situated Selves in "Webs of Interlocution": What Can We Learn from Grammar? [Seite 20]
5.1.1 - 1. The 'self ' as an operator [Seite 20]
5.1.2 - 2. The 'self 'as a noun [Seite 21]
5.1.3 - 3. The 'self ' as a verb and an adverb [Seite 23]
5.1.3.1 - 3.1 The self as Dasein, Sosein and Wahrsein [Seite 23]
5.1.3.2 - 3.2 The self as the relating of a relation [Seite 25]
5.1.3.3 - 3.3 Relations, distinctions and the actual infinite [Seite 28]
5.1.3.4 - 3.4 The self as activity and mode of relating [Seite 29]
5.1.3.5 - 3.5 Two basic questions [Seite 32]
5.1.4 - 4. Self-interpreting animals [Seite 33]
5.1.4.1 - 4.1 Understanding and interpretation [Seite 34]
5.1.4.2 - 4.2 Changing the world by interpreting it [Seite 35]
5.1.4.3 - 4.3 Interpretation and self-interpretation [Seite 36]
5.1.5 - 5. Selves and situations [Seite 36]
5.1.5.1 - 5.1 The relativity and selectivity of situations [Seite 36]
5.1.5.2 - 5.2 Shared situations [Seite 37]
5.1.5.3 - 5.3 Re-presenting interpretations [Seite 38]
5.1.6 - 6. Self-interpretations [Seite 39]
5.1.7 - 7. A sense of self [Seite 41]
5.1.8 - 8. A perennial problem [Seite 43]
5.1.9 - 9. The 'self ' as an orienting device [Seite 45]
5.2 - Marlene Block: God, Grammar and the Truing of the Self: A Response to Ingolf Dalferth [Seite 48]
5.2.1 - 1. The Utility (or not) of the View from Language [Seite 48]
5.2.2 - 2. Reading Ingolf Dalferth Backwards [Seite 52]
5.2.3 - 3. Beginning in the Midst of Grammar as Partes Orationis [Seite 54]
5.2.4 - 4. Rethinking Language and the Self 'from the (Indexical) Ground Up' [Seite 57]
5.2.5 - 5. Final Thoughts: Theology, Grammar, and the Truing of the Self [Seite 60]
6 - II. The European Legacy [Seite 62]
6.1 - Joseph S. O'Leary: The Self and the One in Plotinus [Seite 64]
6.1.1 - The Autonomy of Soul [Seite 66]
6.1.2 - Elusive Selfhood [Seite 69]
6.1.3 - Does Plotinus Need a Firmer Conception of Self? [Seite 72]
6.1.4 - Overcoming Plotinus's Metaphysics [Seite 75]
6.1.5 - Conclusion [Seite 78]
6.2 - Marcelo Souza: A Question of Continuity: A Response to Joseph S. O'Leary [Seite 80]
6.3 - W. Ezekiel Goggin: Selfhood and Sacrifice in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit [Seite 86]
6.3.1 - 1. An Instructive Disjunction: Self, Not-Self, and the Limits of Reflection [Seite 87]
6.3.2 - 2. Desire and the Sacrificial Structure of Recognition [Seite 90]
6.3.3 - 3. Unanticipated Tasks? Some Final Remarks [Seite 94]
6.4 - Iben Damgaard: Kierkegaard on Self and Selflessness in Critical Dialogue with MacIntyre's, Taylor's and Ricoeur's Narrative Approach to the Self [Seite 98]
6.4.1 - Introduction [Seite 98]
6.4.2 - 1. The Narrative Dimension of Contemporary Hermeneutic Approaches to Selfhood [Seite 99]
6.4.3 - 2. Kierkegaard's Either-Or: To Become Oneself by Choosing Oneself [Seite 104]
6.4.4 - 3. Kierkegaard's Works of Love: To Become Oneself in Selfless Love [Seite 117]
6.4.5 - Closing Words [Seite 123]
6.5 - Raymond Perrier: The Grammar of 'Self ': Immediacy and Mediation in Either / Or: A Response to Iben Damgaard [Seite 124]
6.5.1 - 1. Being a Self [Seite 126]
6.5.2 - 2. Being Oneself [Seite 130]
6.5.3 - 3. Dénouement [Seite 136]
7 - III. The Self in Modernity [Seite 138]
7.1 - Kate Kirkpatrick: 'A Perpetually Deceptive Mirage': Jean-Paul Sartre and Blaise Pascal on the Sinful (No?)Self [Seite 140]
7.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 140]
7.1.2 - 1. Sartre's lacking-self [Seite 141]
7.1.3 - 2. Pascal on the self [Seite 145]
7.1.4 - 3. Self or No-Self? [Seite 151]
7.2 - Eleonora Mingarelli: "It is no longer I who lives..." William James and the Process of De-selving [Seite 154]
7.2.1 - I. Breaking Through Continuity [Seite 154]
7.2.1.1 - 1. The Teleological Mind [Seite 157]
7.2.1.2 - 2. The Religious Self: Interest In Varieties [Seite 159]
7.2.1.3 - 3. The Informative Self and The Process of De-Selving [Seite 164]
7.3 - Stephanie Gehring: After the Will: Attention and Selfhood in Simone Weil [Seite 170]
7.3.1 - Introduction [Seite 170]
7.3.2 - 1. On Saying "I" [Seite 171]
7.3.2.1 - 1.1 On Humanness: Weil and Bergson [Seite 173]
7.3.2.2 - 1.2 Attention [Seite 174]
7.3.3 - 2. Decreation [Seite 175]
7.3.3.1 - 2.1 Decreation's Dangers [Seite 178]
7.3.4 - 3. Love in Weil's "Prologue" [Seite 179]
7.3.5 - Conclusion [Seite 181]
7.4 - Joseph Prabhu: The Self in Modernity - a Diachronic and Cross-Cultural Critique [Seite 182]
7.4.1 - I. Adventures of Subjectivity from Kant to Nietzsche [Seite 183]
7.4.2 - II. A Tentative Genealogy [Seite 189]
7.4.3 - III. A Non-Dualist Alternative [Seite 191]
7.4.4 - A Concluding Postscript [Seite 194]
7.5 - Friederike Rass: The Divine in Modernity: A Theological Tweak on Joseph Prabhu's Critique of the Modern Self [Seite 198]
8 - IV. Self and No-Self in Asian Traditions [Seite 204]
8.1 - Alexander McKinley: No Self or Ourselves? Wittgenstein and Language Games of Selfhood in a Sinhala Buddhist Form of Life [Seite 206]
8.1.1 - Life Training and Religious Language [Seite 206]
8.1.2 - Anaphors and Selfhood in a Sinhala Buddhist Form of Life [Seite 212]
8.1.3 - Conclusion - We are Buddhists! [Seite 218]
8.2 - Jonardon Ganeri: Core Selves and Dynamic Attentional Centering: Between Buddhaghosa and Brian O'Shaughnessy [Seite 222]
8.3 - Leah Kalmanson: Like You Mean It: Buddhist Teachings on Selflessness, Sincerity, and the Performative Practice of Liberation [Seite 230]
8.3.1 - Two Examples of the Efficacy of Proper Form [Seite 231]
8.3.2 - Buddhist and Ruist Disagreements over Proper Form [Seite 234]
8.3.3 - Philosophical Context [Seite 237]
8.3.4 - Objections to the Efficacy of Form [Seite 238]
8.3.5 - Further Speculation [Seite 241]
8.4 - Fidel Arnecillo Jr.: Worrisome: Implications of a Buddhist View of Selflessness and Moral Action: A Response to Leah Kalmanson [Seite 244]
8.5 - Gereon Kopf: Self, Selflessness, and the Endless Search for Identity: A Meta-psychology of Human Folly [Seite 250]
8.5.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 250]
8.5.2 - 2. The Key to Identity Politics [Seite 251]
8.5.3 - 3. Essentialism: The Metaphysics Underling Identity Politics [Seite 253]
8.5.4 - 4. A Blueprint of Non-Essentialism [Seite 257]
8.5.5 - 5. A Non-Essentialist Vision of Identity Formation [Seite 262]
8.6 - Deena Lin: Probing Identity: Challenging Essentializations of the Self in Ontology. A Response to Gereon Kopf [Seite 274]
8.6.1 - I. Relevance of Drawing from the Concrete [Seite 274]
8.6.2 - II. The "Third" [Seite 276]
8.6.3 - III. A Buddhist Call to Compassion [Seite 277]
8.7 - Sinkwan Cheng: Confucius, Aristotle, and a New "Right" to Connect China to Europe - What Concepts of "Self " and "Right" We Might Have without the Christian Notion of Original Sin [Seite 280]
8.7.1 - Prologue [Seite 280]
8.7.2 - Preliminary Clarifications [Seite 282]
8.7.3 - Main Text [Seite 285]
8.7.3.1 - 1. From Objective Right to Subjective Right: A Brief Semantic History [Seite 287]
8.7.3.2 - 2. Subjective Right and the Christian Doctrines of Original Sin and the Fall [Seite 290]
8.7.3.3 - 3. Right for Aristotle and Confucius, in contrast to Individual-Based Contractual Theory of Justice [Seite 292]
8.7.3.3.1 - 3.1 Relational Selves [Seite 293]
8.7.3.3.2 - 3.2 "Right" based on the Notion of Inter-Related Selves [Seite 296]
8.7.3.3.2.1 - 3.2.1 Non-Subjective Right - Right being Ad Alterum, or Right as Duty [Seite 298]
8.7.3.3.2.1.1 - 3.2.1.1 Aristotle's "Right" and the Polis [Seite 300]
8.7.3.3.2.1.1.1 - 3.2.1.1.1 General Justice [Seite 300]
8.7.3.3.2.1.1.2 - 3.2.1.1.2 Particular Justice [Seite 302]
8.7.3.3.2.1.2 - 3.2.1.2 Confucius's "Right" and "Humanity in Grand Togetherness" (??) [Seite 303]
8.7.3.3.2.1.2.1 - 3.2.1.2.1 Confucius's Inter-Related Selves [Seite 305]
8.7.3.3.2.1.2.2 - 3.2.1.2.2 Ren and Inter-Related Selves [Seite 306]
8.7.3.4 - Conclusion [Seite 310]
8.8 - Robert Overy-Brown: Right Translation and Making Right: A Response to Sinkwan Cheng [Seite 312]
8.8.1 - On Modern Liberalism [Seite 312]
8.8.2 - Questioning Original Sin [Seite 314]
8.8.3 - Universally Seeking the Good [Seite 316]
8.8.4 - Constructing Good Ethics [Seite 319]
8.8.5 - Conclusion [Seite 320]
9 - V. The End of the Self [Seite 322]
9.1 - Dietrich Korsch: The "Fragility of the Self " and the Immortality of the Soul [Seite 324]
9.1.1 - Introduction [Seite 324]
9.1.2 - I. The fragility of the self [Seite 324]
9.1.3 - II. The Immortality of the Soul [Seite 327]
9.1.4 - III. Immortality and Fragility [Seite 330]
9.2 - Trevor Kimball: Fragile Immortality: A Response to Dietrich Korsch [Seite 334]
9.3 - Yuval Avnur: On Losing Your Self in Your Afterlife [Seite 338]
9.3.1 - 1. What matters? [Seite 342]
9.3.2 - 2. Our concepts don't determine what could happen after death (they only determine what we'd call it) [Seite 346]
9.3.3 - 3. On the coherence of a selfless afterlife that matters (to me) and defective concepts [Seite 355]
9.3.4 - 4. Why are we talking about concepts instead of selves? [Seite 358]
9.4 - Duncan Gale: Self-Awareness in the Afterlife: A Response to Yuval Avnur [Seite 362]
10 - Information about Authors [Seite 366]
11 - Index of Names [Seite 368]
12 - Index of Subjects [Seite 370]

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