Clinical Atlas of Canine and Feline Dermatology

 
 
Standards Information Network (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 9. Juli 2019
  • |
  • 512 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-119-22632-1 (ISBN)
 
Clinical Atlas of Canine and Feline Dermatology presents more than a thousand high-quality color photographs depicting common dermatologic diseases and conditions, making it easy for clinicians to quickly evaluate and accurately identify clinical dermatologic lesions. Easy-to-use charts of dermatologic diseases provide differential diagnoses and treatments, helping practitioners to quickly find the most common differential diagnoses, perform appropriate diagnostics, and treat their patients.

Written by experienced veterinary dermatologists, the book begins with chapters on essential dermatologic diagnostics and identification and interpretation of skin lesions, featuring pictorial illustrations with commentary of the most common causes. Diagnostic algorithms for pruritus and alopecia simplify the workup of these very common presenting symptoms, and easily referenced tables detail the presentation, diagnosis, and management of hundreds of skin diseases. The book also offers a dermatologic formulary including systemic and topical therapies.
* Provides more than 1200 images showing the most encountered dermatologic conditions in dogs and cats
* Includes easy-to-interpret charts of differential diagnoses and treatments
* Offers diagnostic and treatment algorithms for the most common skin diseases in dogs and cats
* Presents details of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of hundreds of skin diseases in tables for quick reference
* Features video clips on a companion website demonstrating dermatologic diagnostic techniques, including skin scrapings and cytology, aspiration of skin masses for cytology, and biopsy

Offering fast access to practical information for diagnosing and treating dermatologic disease in small animal practice, Clinical Atlas of Canine and Feline Dermatology is an essential book for any small animal practitioner or veterinary student.
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The Editor

Kimberly S. Coyner, DVM, DACVD, is a veterinary dermatologist at Dermatology Clinic for Animals in Lacey, WA and a consultant for the Veterinary Information Network.
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the companion website
  • Chapter 1 Dermatology diagnostics
  • 1.1 Skin scrapings (See video on companion website)
  • 1.2 Cytology - Skin and ear (See videos on companion website)
  • 1.3 Cytology - Mass aspirates (See videos on companion website)
  • 1.4 Trichograms
  • 1.5 Dermatophyte culture technique
  • 1.6 Wood's lamp examination
  • 1.7 Dermatophyte culture medium selection and incubation
  • 1.8 Identification of dermatophytes
  • 1.9 Dermatophyte PCR
  • 1.10 Bacterial culture
  • 1.11 Skin biopsies (See videos on companion website)
  • 1.12 Allergy testing
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 2 Dermatology lesions and differential diagnoses
  • 2.1 Primary lesions
  • 2.1.1 Macule/Patch
  • 2.1.2 Papule/pustule
  • 2.1.3 Plaque
  • 2.1.4 Vesicle/bulla
  • 2.1.5 Wheal
  • 2.1.6 Nodule
  • 2.1.7 Cyst
  • 2.2 Primary or secondary lesions
  • 2.2.1 Alopecia (Also see chapters 12 and 13)
  • 2.2.2 Scale
  • 2.2.3 Crust
  • 2.2.4 Follicular cast
  • 2.2.5 Comedo (Comedones)
  • 2.2.6 Pigment change
  • 2.3 Secondary lesions (lesions which occur as sequelae or progression of primary lesions)
  • 2.3.1 Epidermal collarette
  • 2.3.2 Scar
  • 2.3.3 Excoriation
  • 2.3.4 Erosion
  • 2.3.5 Ulcer
  • 2.3.6 Lichenification
  • 2.3.7 Callus
  • 2.3.8 Fissure
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 3 Lesion location and differentials
  • 3.1 Face
  • 3.1.1 Nasal planum
  • 3.1.2 Lips/Eyelids
  • 3.1.3 Muzzle
  • 3.2 Ears
  • 3.2.1 Pinnal margin
  • 3.2.2 Pinna
  • 3.2.3 Outer ear canal
  • 3.3 Paws
  • 3.3.1 Interdigital
  • 3.3.2 Palmar metacarpal/plantar metatarsal
  • 3.3.3 Paw pad
  • 3.3.4 Nailbed
  • 3.4 Claws
  • 3.5 Perianal/perivulvar
  • 3.6 Tail
  • 3.7 Pressure points (elbows/hocks)
  • 3.8 Trunk (dorsal and/or lateral)
  • 3.9 Inguinal/axillary
  • 3.10 Oral cavity
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 4 Causes and workup for pruritus in dogs and cats
  • Algorithm 4.1 Pruritic dog - Causes/Workup
  • Algorithm 4.2 Pruritic cats - Causes/Workup
  • Chapter 5 Causes and workup for alopecia in dogs and cats
  • Algorithm 5.1 Canine non-inflammatory truncal alopecia - Causes/Workup
  • Algorithm 5.2 Canine multifocal alopecia - Causes/Workup
  • Algorithm 5.3 Feline alopecia - Causes/Workup
  • Chapter 6 Breed-related dermatoses
  • Table 6.1 Canine breed-related dermatoses.
  • Table 6.2 Feline breed-related dermatoses.
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 7 Parasitic skin diseases
  • Table 7.1 Canine and feline ectoparasites
  • Table 7.2 Flea control product options
  • Table 7.3 Tick control product options
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8 Bacterial, fungal, oomycete, and algal infections
  • Table 8.1 Superficial bacterial skin infections
  • Algorithm 8.1 Approach to chronic recurrent bacterial pyoderma
  • Table 8.2 Deep bacterial skin infections
  • Table 8.3 Meticillin resistance
  • Table 8.4 Underlying causes for recurrent pyoderma
  • Table 8.5 Commonly used antibiotics for canine pyoderma
  • Table 8.6 Topical antibacterial products
  • Table 8.7 Subcutaneous bacterial infections
  • Table 8.8 Mycobacterial infections
  • Table 8.9 Yeast infections
  • Table 8.10 Dermatophytosis
  • Table 8.11 Environmental decontamination in dermatophytosis
  • Algorithm 8.2 Treatment of generalized dermatophytosis
  • Table 8.12 Deep fungal, oomycete, and algal infections
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 9 Viral, rickettsial, and protozoal dermatologic diseases
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 10 Allergic skin diseases in dogs and cats
  • Table 10.1 Hypersensitivity disorders and treatment of allergic skin diseases
  • Algorithm 10.1 Canine atopic dermatitis treatment
  • Table 10.2 Allergy treatment toolkit
  • Table 10.3 Allergy testing: Intradermal and serologic methods
  • Table 10.4 Considerations in allergen formulation
  • Table 10.5 Protocols for allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT)
  • Table 10.6 Performing an adequate diagnostic hypoallergenic diet trial
  • Table 10.7 Feline manifestations of cutaneous allergy
  • Table 10.8 Eosinophilic granuloma complex
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 11 Autoimmune and immune-mediated dermatologic disorders
  • Table 11.1 Autoimmune and immune-mediated dermatologic disorders
  • Algorithm 11.1 Treatment of canine pemphigus foliaceus
  • Algorithm 11.2 Treatment of feline pemphigus foliaceus
  • Table 11.2 Typical glucocorticoid doses for treatment of autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders
  • Table 11.3 Non-steroidal immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory drugs as adjunctive or primary treatments of autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 12 Endocrine skin diseases
  • Table 12.1 Canine endocrine skin diseases
  • Table 12.2 Trilostane treatment and monitoring
  • Table 12.3 Endocrine skin diseases of cats
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 13 Non-endocrine alopecia
  • Table 13.1 Non-endocrine alopecia of dogs
  • Table 13.2 Non-endocrine alopecia of cats
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 14 Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic otitis
  • 14.1 Approach to otitis
  • 14.2 Otoscopic examination
  • 14.3 Choice of otic medications
  • 14.4 Indications for systemic steroid/antibiotic therapy in otitis treatment
  • 14.5 Choice of otic cleanser/flushes
  • 14.6 Educate owners on how to correctly use ear flushes
  • 14.7 Diagnosis and treatment of otitis media
  • 14.8 When to refer for surgery
  • 14.9 Ototoxicity
  • References/Further reading
  • Chapter 15 Metabolic/nutritional/keratinization dermatologic disorders
  • Table 15.1 Keratinization, metabolic, and nutritional disorders
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 16 Congenital/hereditary dermatologic disorders
  • Table 16.1 Congenital/hereditary dermatologic disorders
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 17 Pigmentary dermatologic disorders
  • Table 17.1 Pigmentary dermatologic disorders
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 18 Environmental skin disorders
  • Table 18.1 Environmental skin disorders
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 19 Skin tumors
  • Table 19.1 Benign and malignant skin tumors in dogs and cats
  • References and further reading
  • Chapter 20 Dermatology formulary
  • Disclaimer
  • Table 20.1 Systemic antibiotics
  • Table 20.2 Systemic antifungals
  • Table 20.3 Systemic antiviral/antiprotozoal medications
  • Table 20.4 Antihistamines
  • Table 20.5 Systemic glucocorticoids
  • Table 20.6 Non-steroidal immunomodulating and immunosuppressive drugs
  • Table 20.7 Behavior modifying medications/analgesics
  • Table 20.8 Systemic antiparasitic drugs
  • Table 20.9 Topical antiparasitics
  • Table 20.10 Nutritional supplements/vitamins/retinoids
  • Table 20.11 Non-glucocorticoid hormones
  • Table 20.12 Topical non-steroidal antipruritic therapies
  • Table 20.13 Topical glucocorticoids
  • Table 20.14 Topical antimicrobials/otics
  • Table 20.15 Topical antiseborrheics
  • Table 20.16 Topical immunomodulators and retinoids
  • Further reading
  • Index
  • EULA
"In my opinion, anyone who treats dogs and cats with dermatologic conditions should have this book in their reference library... For each disease discussed, there is a plethora of color photographs of gross lesions. In my opinion, these images represent the most diverse collection of clinical images for veterinary dermatologic diseases published to date.... In summary, I highly recommend this book for veterinary students, veterinary technicians, primary care veterinarians, and veterinary dermatologists who treat dogs and cats for dermatologic diseases." - JAVMA, Mar 15, 2020, Vol.256, No.6

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