Boron Nitride Nanotubes in Nanomedicine

 
 
William Andrew (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 26. April 2016
  • |
  • 246 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-323-38960-0 (ISBN)
 

Boron Nitride Nanotubes in Nanomedicine compiles, for the first time in a single volume, all the information needed by researchers interested in this promising type of smart nanoparticles and their applications in biomedicine. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) represent an innovative and extremely intriguing class of nanomaterials.

After introducing BNNTs and explaining their preparation and evaluation, the book shows how the physical, chemical, piezoelectric and biocompatibility properties of these nanotubes give rise to their potential uses in biomedicine. Evidence is offered (from both in vitro and in vivo investigations) for how BNNTs can be useful in biomedical and nanomedicine applications such as therapeutic applications, tissue regeneration, nanovectors for drug delivery, and intracellular nanotransducers.


  • Covers a range of promising biomedical BNNT applications
  • Provides great value not just to academics but also industry researchers in fields such as materials science, molecular biology, pharmacology, biomedical engineering, and biophysical sciences
  • Offers evidence for how BNNTs can be useful in biomedical and nanomedicine applications such as therapy, tissue regeneration, nanovectors for drug delivery, and intracellular nanotransducers
  • Incorporates, for the first time in a single volume, all the information needed by researchers interested in this promising type of smart nanoparticles and their applications in biomedicine
  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 21,60 MB
978-0-323-38960-0 (9780323389600)
0323389600 (0323389600)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Cover
  • Titile Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • Biographies
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction to boron nitride nanotubes: synthesis, properties, functionalization, and cutting
  • 1.1 - Introduction
  • 1.2 - Properties of BNNTs for potential biomedical applications
  • 1.3 - Synthesis of BNNTs
  • 1.3.1 - Chemical vapor deposition
  • 1.3.2 - Ball milling
  • 1.3.3 - Laser-based techniques
  • 1.3.4 - Large-scale synthesis by plasma-based techniques
  • 1.4 - Comparison of production rate, purity, and dispersibility of BNNTs
  • 1.5 - Functionalization and cutting of BNNTs for biomedical applications
  • 1.5.1 - Noncovalent functionalization
  • 1.5.2 - Covalent functionalization
  • 1.6 - Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 2 - Functionalization of boron nitride nanotubes for applications innanobiomedicine
  • 2.1 - Introduction
  • 2.2 - Covalent functionalization
  • 2.2.1 - Nitrogen site reaction
  • 2.2.2 - Boron site reaction
  • 2.3 - Noncovalent functionalization
  • 2.3.1 - Small molecules with aromatic groups
  • 2.3.2 - Small molecules without aromatic groups
  • 2.3.3 - Amino acids
  • 2.3.4 - Surfactants
  • 2.3.5 - Peptides
  • 2.3.6 - Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA)
  • 2.3.7 - Lipids
  • 2.3.8 - Polysaccharides
  • 2.3.9 - Polymers
  • 2.4 - Defect reaction approach
  • 2.5 - Filling BNNTs approach
  • 2.6 - Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 3 - Biocompatibility evaluation of boron nitride nanotubes
  • 3.1 - Introduction
  • 3.2 - Common methods for evaluating in vitro biocompatibility
  • 3.2.1 - Viability and cytotoxicity assays
  • 3.2.2 - ROS detection
  • 3.2.3 - Apoptosis and necrosis detection
  • 3.2.4 - Genotoxicity assessment
  • 3.3 - In vitro biocompatibility assessment
  • 3.4 - In vivo biocompatibility assessment
  • 3.5 - Future studies and perspectives
  • 3.6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4 - Theoretical investigations of interactions between boron nitride nanotubes and drugs
  • 4.1 - Introduction
  • 4.2 - Density functional theory methods
  • 4.3 - BNNTs/biomolecules interactions
  • 4.3.1 - BNNTs and platinum-based drugs
  • 4.3.2 - BNNTs and heterocyclic compound
  • 4.3.3 - BNNTs and other clinically-relevant molecules
  • 4.3.4 - BNNTs and amino acids
  • 4.4 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5 - Boron nitride nanotubes as drug carriers
  • 5.1 - Introduction
  • 5.2 - Improving the dispersibility of BNNT-based drug carriers
  • 5.2.1 - Oxidation method
  • 5.2.2 - Polymer surface modification method
  • 5.2.3 - Plasma treatment
  • 5.2.4 - Mesoporous silica coating method
  • 5.3 - Various drug molecules loaded onto BNNT-based drug carriers
  • 5.3.1 - DNA
  • 5.3.2 - Proteins
  • 5.3.3 - Flavin mononucleotide
  • 5.3.4 - Chemotherapy drugs
  • 5.4 - Interactions between BNNTs and drug molecules
  • 5.4.1 - Weak interactions
  • 5.4.2 - Covalent interactions
  • 5.5 - Integration of multifunctional properties in BNNT-BASED drug carriers
  • 5.5.1 - Targeting release
  • 5.5.2 - Imaging
  • 5.5.3 - Acting as B carrier for boron neutron capture therapy
  • 5.6 - Biocompatibility, distribution, and excretion of BNNTs as drug carriers
  • 5.7 - Future of BNNTs as drug carriers
  • References
  • Chapter 6 - Applications and perspectives of boron nitride nanotubes in cancer therapy
  • 6.1 - Cancer: aspects of diagnosis and treatment
  • 6.2 - Boron nitride nanotubes and nanomedicine
  • 6.3 - Drug delivery
  • 6.4 - Active targeting and uptake
  • 6.5 - Gene transfection
  • 6.6 - Magnetohyperthermia
  • 6.7 - Boron neutron capture therapy
  • 6.8 - Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 7 - Boron nitride nanotubes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents
  • 7.1 - Nanomaterials: the way to higher magnetic resonance contrast
  • 7.2 - Superparamagnetic BNNTs as T2-weighted contrast agents
  • 7.3 - Gd-doped BNNTs: promising contrast properties at high and low fields
  • 7.4 - Conclusions and perspectives
  • 7.5 - Appendix. MRI contrast enhancement: the basics
  • References
  • Chapter 8 - Boron nitride nanotubes as nanotransducers
  • 8.1 - Introduction
  • 8.2 - BNNT nanotransducers
  • 8.2.1 - Piezoelectric nanotransducers
  • 8.2.2 - BNNTs as piezoelectric transducers
  • 8.2.3 - BCN-NT nanotransducers
  • 8.3 - BNNT bionanotransducers
  • 8.3.1 - Ultrasound-BNNT systems for cell stimulation
  • 8.3.2 - BNNT nanotransducers for the nervous system
  • 8.3.3 - BNNT nanotransducers for muscle
  • 8.3.4 - BNNT nanotransducers for bone
  • 8.4 - Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter 9 - Optical properties of boron nitride nanotubes: potential exploitation in nanomedicine
  • 9.1 - Introduction
  • 9.2 - Optical properties of boron nitride nanotubes
  • 9.3 - Boron nitride nanotubes in nanomedicine
  • 9.4 - BNNT nonlinear optical properties : exploitation in nanomedicine
  • 9.5 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10 - Boron nitride nanotubes as bionanosensors
  • 10.1 - Introduction
  • 10.2 - Vibration analysis of BNNTs with attached mass
  • 10.2.1 - Cantilevered BNNT with a mass at the tip
  • 10.2.2 - Bridged BNNT with a mass at the midpoint
  • 10.3 - Mass detection and sensitivity calculation
  • 10.4 - Vibrational Analysis of BNNTs Using Molecular Mechanics
  • 10.5 - Results and discussions
  • 10.6 - Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11 - Boron nitride nanotube films: preparation, properties, and implications for biology applications
  • 11.1 - Introduction
  • 11.2 - Growth of BNNT films
  • 11.2.1 - Boron ink method
  • 11.2.2 - Vapor deposition method
  • 11.3 - Wettability properties of BNNT films
  • 11.4 - Wettability modification of BNNT films
  • 11.5 - Biocompatibility of BNNT films
  • 11.6 - Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12 - Structural and physical properties of boron nitride nanotubes and their applications in nanocomposites
  • 12.1 - Introduction
  • 12.2 - Structure and Synthesis of Bnnts
  • 12.2.1 - Structure of BNNTs
  • 12.2.2 - Synthesis Of Bnnts
  • 12.3 - Physical properties of BNNTs
  • 12.3.1 - Mechanical properties
  • 12.3.2 - Electrical properties
  • 12.3.3 - Thermal properties
  • 12.4 - BNNT-based nanocomposites
  • 12.5 - Conclusions and outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 13 - Boron nitride nanotubes in nanomedicine: historical and future perspectives
  • 13.1 - A brief history of boron nitride nanotubes: from the theoretical hypothesis to the market
  • 13.2 - Main research groups involved in BNNT research
  • 13.3 - BNNT availability on the market
  • 13.4 - Patent analysis and economical implications
  • 13.5 - Toward the future : regulatory aspects and translational research
  • References
  • Subject Index
  • Back cover

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