Sustainable Surface Water Management

A Handbook for SUDS
 
 
Wiley-Blackwell (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 13. September 2016
  • |
  • 432 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-1-118-89767-6 (ISBN)
 
Sustainable Surface Water Management: a handbook for SUDS addresses issues as diverse as flooding, water quality, amenity and biodiversity but also mitigation of, and adaptation to, global climate change, human health benefits and reduction in energy use. Chapters are included to cover issues from around the world, but they also address particular designs associated with the implementation of SUDS in tropical areas, problems with retrofitting SUDS devices, SUDS modelling, water harvesting in drought-stricken countries using SUDS and the inclusion of SUDS in the climate change strategies of such cities as Tokyo, New York and Strasbourg.
1. Auflage
  • Englisch
  • Hoboken
  • |
  • Großbritannien
John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • 51,70 MB
978-1-118-89767-6 (9781118897676)
1118897676 (1118897676)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
Susanne Charlesworth is a Reader in Urban Physical Geography at Coventry University in the department of Geography, Environment and Disaster Management. She is Director of a Sustainable Drainage (SUDS) Applied Research Group at Coventry University.
Colin Booth is Associate Professor of Sustainability, Associate Head of Research and Scholarship and Director of the Construction and Property Research Centre at the University of the West of England, Bristol.
1 - Title Page [Seite 5]
2 - Copyright Page [Seite 6]
3 - Contents [Seite 9]
4 - List of Contributors [Seite 17]
5 - About the Editors [Seite 21]
6 - Section 1 Introduction to the Book [Seite 23]
6.1 - Chapter 1 An Overture of Sustainable Surface Water Management [Seite 25]
6.1.1 - 1.1 Introduction [Seite 25]
6.1.2 - 1.2 Surface Water Management [Seite 25]
6.1.3 - 1.3 Sustainable Surface Water Management [Seite 27]
6.1.4 - 1.4 Organisation of the Book [Seite 27]
6.1.5 - References [Seite 31]
7 - Section 2 Sustainable Surface Water Management in Context [Seite 33]
7.1 - Chapter 2 Back to the Future? History and Contemporary Application of Sustainable Drainage Techniques [Seite 35]
7.1.1 - 2.1 Introduction [Seite 35]
7.1.2 - 2.2 'Sustainability'? [Seite 36]
7.1.3 - 2.3 Rainwater Harvesting in Antiquity [Seite 37]
7.1.4 - 2.4 Water Quality Improvement [Seite 41]
7.1.5 - 2.5 Water Quantity Reduction: Sub-Surface Drainage [Seite 45]
7.1.6 - 2.6 Water Storage [Seite 46]
7.1.7 - 2.7 Reduction in Water Demand: Greywater Recycling [Seite 46]
7.1.8 - 2.8 Reducing Water Velocity [Seite 47]
7.1.9 - 2.9 Non-Structural Approaches to Sustainable Water Management [Seite 48]
7.1.10 - 2.10 Conclusions [Seite 50]
7.1.11 - References [Seite 50]
7.2 - Chapter 3 Surface Water Strategy, Policy and Legislation [Seite 53]
7.2.1 - 3.1 Introduction [Seite 53]
7.2.2 - 3.2 Legislative Hierarchies [Seite 54]
7.2.3 - 3.3 Case Study - The United Kingdom [Seite 55]
7.2.4 - 3.4 Comparison of UK Approaches with Other Countries [Seite 63]
7.2.5 - 3.5 Conclusions [Seite 64]
7.2.6 - References [Seite 64]
7.3 - Chapter 4 Sustainable Drainage Systems: Operation and Maintenance [Seite 67]
7.3.1 - 4.1 Introduction [Seite 67]
7.3.2 - 4.2 What is Operation and Maintenance and Why is it Important? [Seite 68]
7.3.3 - 4.3 Inspection, Reporting and Maintenance [Seite 69]
7.3.4 - 4.4 Maintenance Schedules and Planned Maintenance [Seite 72]
7.3.5 - 4.5 Other Considerations that Will Impact on Maintenance [Seite 74]
7.3.6 - 4.6 Conclusions [Seite 76]
7.3.7 - References [Seite 77]
8 - Section 3 Functions of Sustainable Drainage Systems [Seite 79]
8.1 - Chapter 5 Water Quantity: Attenuation of the Storm Peak [Seite 81]
8.1.1 - 5.1 Introduction [Seite 81]
8.1.2 - 5.2 Conventional Drainage, Water Flow and Volume [Seite 81]
8.1.3 - 5.3 Existing Flood Management [Seite 82]
8.1.4 - 5.4 Water Quantity [Seite 83]
8.1.5 - 5.5 History of SuDS Implementation [Seite 84]
8.1.6 - 5.6 The Management Train [Seite 87]
8.1.7 - 5.7 Retrofit [Seite 92]
8.1.8 - 5.8 New Build [Seite 93]
8.1.9 - 5.9 Flow Control [Seite 94]
8.1.10 - 5.10 Conclusions [Seite 94]
8.1.11 - References [Seite 96]
8.2 - Chapter 6 Urban Water and Sediment Quality [Seite 101]
8.2.1 - 6.1 Introduction [Seite 101]
8.2.2 - 6.2 Sources of Pollutants Mobilised by Urban Runoff [Seite 101]
8.2.3 - 6.3 Quality of Urban Runoff Originating from a Range of Land Use Types [Seite 102]
8.2.4 - 6.4 Quality and Behaviour of Sediment in Urban Receiving Water Bodies [Seite 104]
8.2.5 - 6.5 Treatment of Urban Runoff Using SuDS [Seite 105]
8.2.6 - 6.6 Pollutant Removal Processes that Occur in SuDS [Seite 107]
8.2.7 - 6.7 Quality and Behaviour of Sediment in SuDS [Seite 109]
8.2.8 - References [Seite 110]
8.3 - Chapter 7 Sustainable Drainage Systems: Delivering Multiple Benefits for People and Wildlife [Seite 113]
8.3.1 - 7.1 Introduction [Seite 113]
8.3.2 - 7.2 Getting Better SuDS [Seite 114]
8.3.3 - 7.3 SuDS and How They Support Biodiversity [Seite 115]
8.3.4 - 7.4 Involving People [Seite 117]
8.3.5 - 7.5 Designing SuDS for People and Wildlife [Seite 118]
8.3.6 - 7.6 SuDS Management Trains and Their Wildlife Benefits [Seite 120]
8.3.7 - 7.7 Community Managed and Wildlife-Rich SuDS - a Case Study of Springhill Cohousing, Stroud, Gloucestershire [Seite 125]
8.3.8 - References [Seite 126]
8.4 - Chapter 8 Amenity: Delivering Value for Society [Seite 127]
8.4.1 - 8.1 Emergence of the Amenity Concept [Seite 127]
8.4.2 - 8.2 Amenity, Recreation and Biodiversity in the Built Environment [Seite 129]
8.4.3 - 8.3 SuDS Amenity and Sustainable Development [Seite 132]
8.4.4 - 8.4 Reviewing the Public Perception of the Concept of Amenity and SuDS [Seite 133]
8.4.5 - 8.5 Conclusions [Seite 134]
8.4.6 - References [Seite 134]
8.5 - Chapter 9 Biodegradation in Green Infrastructure [Seite 137]
8.5.1 - 9.1 Introduction [Seite 137]
8.5.2 - 9.2 Environmental Conditions and Requirements for Biodegradation [Seite 138]
8.5.3 - 9.3 Biofilms: What They Are, What They Do and How They Work [Seite 140]
8.5.4 - 9.4 Biodegradation in Green SuDS [Seite 141]
8.5.5 - 9.5 Nitrogen in Green SuDS [Seite 144]
8.5.6 - 9.6 Conclusions [Seite 145]
8.5.7 - References [Seite 146]
8.6 - Chapter 10 Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Hard Infrastructure [Seite 149]
8.6.1 - 10.1 Introduction [Seite 149]
8.6.2 - 10.2 Hard SuDS Structure, Design and Related Technologies [Seite 150]
8.6.3 - 10.3 Evidence of Biodegradation in Hard SuDS [Seite 152]
8.6.4 - 10.4 Hard SuDS Microbiology and Biofilms [Seite 154]
8.6.5 - 10.5 Design and Diversification from Standard Hard SuDS [Seite 156]
8.6.6 - 10.6 Other Hard SuDS Biodegradation Studies [Seite 157]
8.6.7 - 10.7 Design Optimisation for Catastrophic Pollution Events [Seite 158]
8.6.8 - 10.8 Conclusions [Seite 160]
8.6.9 - References [Seite 161]
8.7 - Chapter 11 Use of Geosynthetics for Sustainable Drainage [Seite 164]
8.7.1 - 11.1 Introduction to Geosynthetics [Seite 164]
8.7.2 - 11.2 Classifications, Functions and Applications of Geosynthetics [Seite 165]
8.7.3 - 11.3 Application of Geotextiles in SuDS [Seite 167]
8.7.4 - 11.4 Secondary Uses for Urban Water [Seite 172]
8.7.5 - 11.5 Conclusions [Seite 173]
8.7.6 - References [Seite 174]
9 - Section 4 Multiple Benefits of Sustainable Drainage Systems [Seite 179]
9.1 - Chapter 12 Natural Flood Risk Management and its Role in Working with Natural Processes [Seite 181]
9.1.1 - 12.1 Introduction [Seite 181]
9.1.2 - 12.2 Defining NFRM [Seite 181]
9.1.3 - 12.3 Examples of NFRM Studies [Seite 183]
9.1.4 - 12.4 Significance of NFRM in Meeting Policy Agendas [Seite 193]
9.1.5 - 12.5 Conclusions [Seite 194]
9.1.6 - References [Seite 194]
9.1.7 - Statuses [Seite 198]
9.2 - Chapter 13 Sustainable Drainage Systems and Energy: Generation and Reduction [Seite 199]
9.2.1 - 13.1 Introduction [Seite 199]
9.2.2 - 13.2 Ground Source Heat Extraction [Seite 200]
9.2.3 - 13.3 Pervious Paving Systems [Seite 200]
9.2.4 - 13.4 Results of Monitoring the EcoHouse [Seite 204]
9.2.5 - 13.5 The Hanson Stewartby Office, Bedford, UK [Seite 206]
9.2.6 - 13.6 Reducing Energy Use: The Use of Green and Blue Infrastructure on Buildings [Seite 208]
9.2.7 - 13.7 Conclusions [Seite 210]
9.2.8 - References [Seite 211]
9.3 - Chapter 14 Carbon Sequestration and Storage: The Case for Green Roofs in Urban Areas [Seite 215]
9.3.1 - 14.1 Introduction [Seite 215]
9.3.2 - 14.2 The Importance of Carbon Sequestration [Seite 215]
9.3.3 - 14.3 Coupling the Stormwater Management Benefits of Green Roofs with Carbon Sequestration [Seite 217]
9.3.4 - 14.4 Carbon Sequestration on Green Roofs [Seite 219]
9.3.5 - 14.5 Embodied Energy [Seite 220]
9.3.6 - 14.6 Improving Carbon Sequestration Potential [Seite 221]
9.3.7 - 14.7 Conclusions [Seite 223]
9.3.8 - References [Seite 223]
9.4 - Chapter 15 Dual-Purpose Rainwater Harvesting System Design [Seite 227]
9.4.1 - 15.1 Introduction [Seite 227]
9.4.2 - 15.2 RWH and SuDS in England and Wales [Seite 228]
9.4.3 - 15.3 Approaches to Stormwater Source Control Using RwH in England and Wales [Seite 229]
9.4.4 - 15.4 Integrating Stormwater Source Control into RwH System Design [Seite 231]
9.4.5 - 15.5 Conclusions [Seite 237]
9.4.6 - Acknowledgements [Seite 238]
9.4.7 - References [Seite 238]
9.5 - Chapter 16 Progress with Integration of Ecosystem Services in SuDS [Seite 240]
9.5.1 - 16.1 Introduction [Seite 240]
9.5.2 - 16.2 Potential Contribution of SuDS Types to Ecosystem Services [Seite 242]
9.5.3 - 16.3 Analysis of Ecosystem Service Outcomes from SuDS Schemes [Seite 243]
9.5.4 - 16.4 Recognising the Multi-Functional Opportunities of SuDS [Seite 250]
9.5.5 - 16.5 Conclusions and Recommendations [Seite 252]
9.5.6 - References [Seite 252]
10 - Section 5 Integrating Sustainable Surface Water Management into the Built Environment [Seite 255]
10.1 - Chapter 17 Whole Life Costing and Multiple Benefits of Sustainable Drainage [Seite 257]
10.1.1 - 17.1 Introduction [Seite 257]
10.1.2 - 17.2 Whole Life Costing [Seite 258]
10.1.3 - 17.3 Multiple Benefits of SuDS [Seite 260]
10.1.4 - 17.4 Conclusions [Seite 263]
10.1.5 - Acknowledgement [Seite 264]
10.1.6 - References [Seite 264]
10.2 - Chapter 18 Green Roof and Permeable Paving Retrofit to Mitigate Pluvial Flooding [Seite 267]
10.2.1 - 18.1 Introduction [Seite 267]
10.2.2 - 18.2 Types of Green Roof for Stormwater Management [Seite 268]
10.2.3 - 18.3 Building Retrofit Characteristics [Seite 269]
10.2.4 - 18.4 Drivers and Barriers to the Uptake of SuDS in Melbourne [Seite 275]
10.2.5 - 18.5 Estimation of Runoff Under Different Scenarios [Seite 277]
10.2.6 - 18.6 Conclusions and Further Research [Seite 277]
10.2.7 - Acknowledgements [Seite 278]
10.2.8 - References [Seite 278]
10.3 - Chapter 19 Contemporary Landscapes and Buildings of Motorway Service Areas [Seite 281]
10.3.1 - 19.1 Introduction [Seite 281]
10.3.2 - 19.2 Motorway Service Areas in the UK [Seite 281]
10.3.3 - 19.3 Exemplar Motorway Service Areas [Seite 282]
10.3.4 - 19.4 Conclusions [Seite 289]
10.3.5 - References [Seite 289]
10.4 - Chapter 20 Modelling for Design [Seite 292]
10.4.1 - 20.1 Introduction [Seite 292]
10.4.2 - 20.2 One-Dimensional Modelling [Seite 292]
10.4.3 - 20.3 Two-Dimensional Flood Modelling [Seite 293]
10.4.4 - 20.4 One-Dimensional and Two?Dimensional Modelling [Seite 293]
10.4.5 - 20.5 Three-Dimensional Modelling [Seite 293]
10.4.6 - 20.6 Modelling Uncertainty [Seite 293]
10.4.7 - 20.7 Validation of Models: Monitoring of SuDS Management Trains [Seite 294]
10.4.8 - 20.8 Scale of Drainage Modelling [Seite 294]
10.4.9 - 20.9 Issues with SuDS Modelling [Seite 296]
10.4.10 - 20.10 Case Study: Modelling the Impacts of a SuDS Management Train at Prior Deram Park, Coventry, UK, Using Microdrainage® [Seite 298]
10.4.11 - 20.11 Case Study: Decision Support Tool for Coventry, UK [Seite 300]
10.4.12 - 20.12 Site Design [Seite 302]
10.4.13 - 20.13 Conclusions [Seite 303]
10.4.14 - References [Seite 303]
10.5 - Chapter 21 Public Perceptions of Sustainable Drainage Devices [Seite 307]
10.5.1 - 21.1 Introduction [Seite 307]
10.5.2 - 21.2 Public Preferences and Understanding of Flood Risk Management [Seite 308]
10.5.3 - 21.3 The Sustainability of SuDS [Seite 308]
10.5.4 - 21.4 Attitudes and Behaviour: Portland, Oregon, USA [Seite 310]
10.5.5 - 21.5 Co-development and Co-ownership [Seite 314]
10.5.6 - 21.6 Conclusions [Seite 315]
10.5.7 - References [Seite 315]
11 - Section 6 Global Sustainable Surface Water Management [Seite 321]
11.1 - Chapter 22 Sustainable Drainage Out of the Temperate Zone: The Humid Tropics [Seite 323]
11.1.1 - 22.1 Introduction [Seite 323]
11.1.2 - 22.2 Modification of the Urban Hydrological Cycle by Urbanisation in Tropical Countries [Seite 325]
11.1.3 - 22.3 Vegetated Devices [Seite 325]
11.1.4 - 22.4 Case Study: Sustainable Drainage in Malaysia [Seite 330]
11.1.5 - 22.5 Conclusions [Seite 334]
11.1.6 - References [Seite 335]
11.2 - Chapter 23 Sustainable Drainage Systems in Brazil [Seite 337]
11.2.1 - 23.1 Introduction [Seite 337]
11.2.2 - 23.2 The History of SuDS in Brazil - an Academic Perspective [Seite 338]
11.2.3 - 23.3 Legal Framework [Seite 341]
11.2.4 - 23.4 Case Examples [Seite 342]
11.2.5 - 23.5 Concluding Remarks [Seite 347]
11.2.6 - References [Seite 348]
11.3 - Chapter 24 Interim Measures Towards Sustainable Drainage in the Informal Settlements of South Africa [Seite 350]
11.3.1 - 24.1 Introduction [Seite 350]
11.3.2 - 24.2 Overview of the Development of Informal Settlements in South Africa [Seite 352]
11.3.3 - 24.3 Co-Management of Drainage [Seite 352]
11.3.4 - 24.4 Langrug: A Case Study of an Informal Settlement [Seite 353]
11.3.5 - 24.5 Research-Led Efforts: First Approach [Seite 355]
11.3.6 - 24.6 Discussion on Research-Led Approach to Drainage [Seite 357]
11.3.7 - 24.7 Building Partnerships: A Second Approach [Seite 359]
11.3.8 - 24.8 Provincial Government Intervention [Seite 361]
11.3.9 - 24.9 Biomimicry at Work: Greywater Swales [Seite 361]
11.3.10 - 24.10 Sustainable Urban Drainage Centre [Seite 361]
11.3.11 - 24.11 Discussion [Seite 363]
11.3.12 - 24.12 Conclusions [Seite 365]
11.3.13 - References [Seite 365]
11.4 - Chapter 25 Low Impact Development in the USA [Seite 367]
11.4.1 - 25.1 Introduction [Seite 367]
11.4.2 - 25.2 Unifying Legislation [Seite 367]
11.4.3 - 25.3 Stormwater Management Practices [Seite 368]
11.4.4 - 25.4 Low-Impact Development [Seite 370]
11.4.5 - 25.5 Stormwater and Urban Agendas [Seite 372]
11.4.6 - 25.6 Choices in Challenging Urban Districts [Seite 374]
11.4.7 - References [Seite 376]
11.5 - Chapter 26 Sustainable Drainage Systems in Spain [Seite 377]
11.5.1 - 26.1 Introduction [Seite 377]
11.5.2 - 26.2 SuDS Case Studies in the Northern Regions of Spain [Seite 379]
11.5.3 - 26.3 Integration of SuDS into New Urban Developments [Seite 383]
11.5.4 - 26.4 SuDS Retrofitting Case Studies in the Mediterranean Region [Seite 384]
11.5.5 - 26.5 Conclusions [Seite 388]
11.5.6 - References [Seite 390]
11.6 - Chapter 27 Sustainable Drainage at the City Scale: A Case Study in Glasgow, Scotland [Seite 392]
11.6.1 - 27.1 Introduction [Seite 392]
11.6.2 - 27.2 SuDS and Legislation [Seite 393]
11.6.3 - 27.3 The Importance of Multi-Functionality [Seite 394]
11.6.4 - 27.4 Design Studies [Seite 395]
11.6.5 - 27.5 Nitshill Design Study [Seite 397]
11.6.6 - 27.6 City Centre Surface Water Management [Seite 398]
11.6.7 - 27.7 Funding [Seite 399]
11.6.8 - 27.8 The Future [Seite 400]
11.6.9 - References [Seite 400]
11.7 - Chapter 28 Water Sensitive Design in Auckland, New Zealand [Seite 402]
11.7.1 - 28.1 Introduction [Seite 402]
11.7.2 - 28.2 WSD in Auckland: Drivers of Design [Seite 404]
11.7.3 - 28.3 Case Study: Wynyard Quarter [Seite 410]
11.7.4 - 28.4 Conclusions and Parting Thought [Seite 411]
11.7.5 - References [Seite 412]
12 - Section 7 Summary of the Book [Seite 415]
12.1 - Chapter 29 Challenges for the Future: Are Sustainable Drainage Systems Really Sustainable? [Seite 417]
12.1.1 - 29.1 Introduction [Seite 417]
12.1.2 - 29.2 Barriers and Drivers [Seite 418]
12.1.3 - 29.3 What is the Future for SuDS? [Seite 420]
12.1.4 - 29.4 Conclusions [Seite 421]
12.1.5 - References [Seite 421]
13 - Index [Seite 422]
14 - Supplemental Images [Seite 432]
15 - EULA [Seite 435]

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