Conquest of New Spain

 
 
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  • erschienen am 1. Februar 2012
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  • 568 Seiten
 
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978-1-4209-4661-1 (ISBN)
 
You don't have to be a history lover to enjoy Bernal Diaz del Castillo's first-person narrative "The Conquest of New Spain." His personal tale about being a conquistador during the fall of the Aztec empire is filled with beautiful imagery, frightful battles, and unspoken orders that occurred during the 1500's. The account also describes the Aztec culture with profound detail and insight; Castillo was amazed at the wonders of the Aztecs, yet he never forgot why he came to New Spain in the first place: "to serve God, and to also get rich." Besides Castillo's descriptions, "The Conquest of New Spain" is singular in that it gives an unflattering account of Herman Cortes, the leader of the expedition to Mesoamerica. History has generally praised Cortes for his leadership ability and strong army of conquistadors, but Castillo paints Cortes as a man who cheated his soldiers out of the glory they deserved. Many soldiers found themselves no richer than before they arrived, and Castillo blames this on Cortes having taken his soldiers' share of the Aztec riches. Castillo waited until he was over eighty years old to complete his narrative. He wanted the truth of the fateful expedition to be fully exposed and complete, and "The Conquest of New Spain" was Castillo's way of making sure that the story of the common soldier was told in vivid detail.
  • Englisch
  • Stilwell
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  • USA
Neeland Media LLC
978-1-4209-4661-1 (9781420946611)
1420946617 (1420946617)
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  • Title page
  • VOLUME I.
  • TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE.
  • AUTHOR'S PREFACE.
  • CHAPTER I. The time of my departure from Castile, and what further happened to me.
  • CHAPTER II. Of the Discovery of Yucatan, and the battle we fought there with the Natives.
  • CHAPTER III. Discovery of the Coast of Campeachy.
  • CHAPTER IV. How we landed in a bay close to some maise plantations, near the harbour of Potonchan, and of the attack that was made upon us there.
  • CHAPTER V. We resolve to return to Cuba. The extreme thirst we suffered, and all the fatigues we underwent until our arrival in the port of Havannah.
  • CHAPTER VI. How twenty of us went on shore in the bay of Florida with the pilot Alaminos in search of water
  • the hostilities which the natives of this country commenced with us
  • and of all that further befel us on our passage to the Havannah.
  • CHAPTER VII. The fatigues I had to undergo, until my arrival in the town of Trinidad.
  • CHAPTER VIII. How Diego Velasquez, governor of Cuba, sent out another armament to the country we had discovered.
  • CHAPTER IX. How we landed at Champoton.
  • CHAPTER X. We continued our course and ran into Terminos bay, as we named it.
  • CHAPTER XI. How we came into the Tabasco river, which we termed the Grijalva, and what happened to us there.
  • CHAPTER XII. We come in sight of the town of Aguajaluco, and give it the name of La Rambla.
  • CHAPTER XIII. How we arrive on the Bandera's Stream, and gain 1500 pesos.
  • CHAPTER XIV. How we came into the harbour of San Juan de Culua.
  • CHAPTER XV. Diego Velasquez sends out a small vessel in quest of us.
  • CHAPTER XVI. What befell us on our coasting voyage along the Tusta and Tuspa mountains.
  • CHAPTER XVII. Diego Velasquez despatches one of his officials to Spain.
  • CHAPTER XVIII. Of some errors in the work of Francisco Lopez de Gomara.
  • CHAPTER XIX. How another armament was fitted out for a voyage to the newly discovered countries. The command of which was given to Hernando Cortes, afterwards Marquis of the Vale of Oaxaca
  • also of the secret cabals which were formed to deprive him of it.
  • CHAPTER XX. Of the designs and plans of Hernando Cortes after he had obtained the appointment of captain.
  • CHAPTER XXI. Cortes's occupations at Trinidad, and of the cavaliers and warriors who there joined our expedition, and other matters.
  • CHAPTER XXII. How the governor Diego Velasquez sends two of his officials in all haste to Trinidad, with full power and authority to deprive Cortes of his appointment of captain, and bring the squadron away, &c.
  • CHAPTER XXIII. Cortes embarks with all his cavaliers and soldiers in order to sail along the south side of the island to the Havannah, and sends off one of the vessels to go around the north coast for the same port.
  • CHAPTER XXIV. Diego Velasquez sends one of his officials, named Gaspar Garnica, with full authority to take Cortes prisoner, whatever might be the consequence
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XXV. Cortes sets sail with the whole squadron for the island of Cozumel, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER XXVI. Cortes reviews his troops, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XXVII. Cortes receives information that two Spaniards are in the power of the Indians at the promontory of Cotoche: the steps he took upon this news.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII. The manner in which Cortes divides the squadron. The officers whom he appointed to the command of the several vessels. His instructions to the pilots
  • the signals which were to be made with lanterns at night, &c.
  • CHAPTER XXIX. How the Spaniard Geronimo de Aguilar, who was in the power of the Indians, came to us when he learnt that we had again returned to the island of Cozumel, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XXX. How we re-embark and sail for the river Grijalva, and what happened to us on our voyage there.
  • CHAPTER XXXI. How we arrive in the river Grijalva, called in the Indian language the Tabasco
  • the battle we fought there
  • and what further took place
  • CHAPTER XXXII. How Cortes despatches two of our principal officers, each with one hundred men, to explore the interior of the country, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII. Cortes issues orders that we should hold ourselves in readiness to march against the Indians on the following day
  • he also commands the horses to be brought on shore. How the battle terminates we fought with them.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV. How we are attacked by all the caziques of Tabasco, and the whole armed force of this province, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER XXXV. How Cortes assembles all the caziques of this province, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI. How all the caziques and calachonis of the river Grijalva arrive with presents, and what happened after this.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII. How Doña Marina herself was a caziquess, and the daughter of distinguished personages
  • also a ruler over a people and several towns, and how she came to Tabasco.
  • CHAPTER XXXVIII. How we arrive with our vessels in San Juan de Ulua, and what we did there.
  • CHAPTER XXXIX. How Teuthlille makes his report to Motecusuma, and gives him our presents
  • as also what further took place in our camp.
  • CHAPTER XL. How Cortes goes in search of another harbour and a good spot to found a colony, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XLI. What happened on account of our bartering for gold, and of other things which took place in our camp.
  • CHAPTER XLII. How we elected Hernando Cortes captain-general and chief justice until we should receive the emperor's commands on this head
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XLIII. How the partisans of Diego Velasquez would not acknowledge the power we had conferred upon Cortes, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER XLIV. How Pedro de Alvarado was ordered to make an excursion into the interior of the country, in order to procure maise and other provisions
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XLV. How we marched into Sempoalla, which at that period was a very considerable township, and what we did there.
  • CHAPTER XLVI. How we march into Quiahuitzlan, which was a town with fortifications, and were most friendly received.
  • CHAPTER XLVII. How Cortes ordered the five Mexican tax-gatherers to be imprisoned, and no further obedience to be paid Motecusuma, nor tribute to be exacted
  • and of the rebellion which was now excited against this monarch.
  • CHAPTER XLVIII. How we resolved to found Villa Rica de la Vera Cruz and construct a fortress on the low meadows, in the neighbourhood of some salt springs and the harbour, where our vessels were anchored
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XLIX. How the fat cazique and other chief men of the country come and complain to Cortes, that a garrison of Mexicans had been thrown into the strong fortress of Tzinpantzinco, committing great depredations
  • and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER L. How some of Diego Velasquez's adherents refused to take any further part in our proceedings, and declared their determination to return to Cuba, seeing that Cortes was earnestly bent upon founding a colony, and had already commenced to pacify the inhabitants.
  • CHAPTER LI. What happened to us at Tzinpantzinco, and how, on our return to Sempoalla, we destroyed all the idols
  • likewise of other matters.
  • CHAPTER LII. How Cortes erects an altar, and places thereon the image of the blessed Virgin with a cross
  • after which mass was said, and the eight Indian females baptized.
  • CHAPTER LIII. How we arrived in our town of Vera Cruz, and what happened there.
  • CHAPTER LIV. Concerning the account of our adventures, with the letter, which we sent his majesty the emperor, through Puertocarrero and Montejo, the letter being attested by some officers and soldiers.
  • CHAPTER LV. How Diego Velasquez is informed by his agents that we had sent messengers with letters and presents to our king, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER LVI. How our agents passed through the Bahama channel with the most favorable wind, and arrived in Castile after a short passage
  • and of our success at court.
  • CHAPTER LVII. What took place in our camp after the departure of our agents to his majesty with the gold and the letters
  • and the instance of severity which Cortes was compelled to give.
  • CHAPTER LVIII. How we came to the resolution of marching to Mexico, and of destroying all our vessels, which was done with the sanction and by the advice of all Cortes' true adherents.
  • CHAPTER LIX. Of the speech which Cortes made to us after our vessels were destroyed, and how we prepared for our march to Mexico.
  • CHAPTER LX. How Cortes arrived with us at the spot where the vessel lay at anchor, and captured six soldiers and sailors of the said vessel, who had stepped on shore
  • also what further took place.
  • CHAPTER LXI. How we set out on our march to the city of Mexico, and, upon the advice of the caziques, take our road over Tlascalla. What took place here, and of the battles we fought.
  • CHAPTER LXII. How we commenced our march upon Tlascalla, and sent messengers before us, to obtain the sanction of the inhabitants to pass through their country
  • how they took our messengers prisoners, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXIII. Of the terrible battles we fought with the Tlascallans, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXIV. How we quartered ourselves in the township of Tehuacacinco, and what we did there.
  • CHAPTER LXV. Of the great battle we fought with the Tlascallans, and what further took place.
  • CHAPTER LXVI. How we sent a message next day to the caziques of Tlascalla to bring about peace between us, and the determination they came to upon this.
  • CHAPTER LXVII. How we again sent messengers to the caziques of Tlascalla in order to induce them to make peace, and the resolution they came to upon this.
  • CHAPTER LXVIII. How we came to the determination of marching to a township in the neighbourhood of our camp, and what happened upon this.
  • CHAPTER LXIX. How we found on our return to our encampment that new intrigues had been set on foot
  • and the answer Cortes gave to certain representations which were made to him.
  • CHAPTER LXX. How the captain Xicotencatl assembled 20,000 chosen warriors to make an attack upon us in our camp, and what happened upon this.
  • CHAPTER LXXI. How four chief personages arrived in our camp to negotiate terms of peace with us, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXII. How ambassadors arrive in our camp from Motecusuma, and of the presents they brought with them.
  • CHAPTER LXXIII. How the captain-general Xicotencatl arrives in our camp to negotiate terms of peace
  • the speech he made, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXIV. How the old caziques of Tlascalla arrived in our camp and invited Cortes, and all of us to visit their city, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXV. How we marched into the city of Tlascalla, and were received by the old caziques
  • of the present they made us, and how they brought us their daughters and nieces
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXVI. How mass was said in the presence of a great number of caziques, and of the present the latter brought us.
  • CHAPTER LXXVII. How the caziques presented their daughters to Cortes and all of us, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXVIII. How Cortes gained some information respecting Mexico from Xicotencatl and Maxixcatzin.
  • CHAPTER LXXIX. How our captain Hernando Cortes and all our officers and soldiers determine to march to Mexico.
  • CHAPTER LXXX. How the great Motecusuma despatched four ambassadors to us, all men in high authority, with presents in gold and cotton stuffs, and what they said to our captains.
  • CHAPTER LXXXI. How the inhabitants of Cholulla despatched four Indians to us, all men of no distinction, to apologise for not having visited us in Tlascalla, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXXII. How we arrived in the town of Cholulla, and the brilliant reception we met with.
  • CHAPTER LXXXIII. How the inhabitants of Cholulla concerted a plan, at the instigation of Motecusuma, to murder us all, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXXIV. The negotiations we set on foot with the great Motecusuma, and the ambassadors we sent him.
  • CHAPTER LXXXV. How the powerful Motecusuma sends a valuable present in gold to us, and the message which accompanied it, and how we all agree to commence our march upon Mexico
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER LXXXVI. How we set out on our march to Mexico
  • what happened to us on our route
  • and the message Motecusuma sent us.
  • CHAPTER LXXXVII. How the powerful Motecusuma again sends ambassadors to us with a present of gold and cotton stuffs: that monarch's message to Cortes, and the answer he returns.
  • CHAPTER LXXXVIII. The magnificent and pompous reception which the powerful Motecusuma gave to Cortes and all of us, on our entrance into the great city of Mexico.
  • CHAPTER LXXXIX. How Motecusuma, accompanied by several caziques, pays us a visit in our quarters, and of the discourse that passed between him and our general.
  • CHAPTER XC. How our general, the day following, paid a visit to Motecusuma, and of the discourse that passed between them.
  • CHAPTER XCI. Of Motecusuma's person, disposition, habits, and of his great power.
  • CHAPTER XCII. Our general takes a walk through Mexico, and views the Tlatelulco, (the great square,) and the chief temple of Huitzilopochtli.
  • CHAPTER XCIII. How we erect a chapel and altar in our quarters with a cross on the outside
  • discover the treasure of Motecusuma's father
  • and determine to seize the monarch's person and imprison him in our quarters.
  • CHAPTER XCIV. Of the battle which the Mexican generals fought with Escalante and the Totonaque tribes.
  • CHAPTER XCV. Of the imprisonment of Motecusuma, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER XCVI. How our general appoints Alonso Grado lieutenant of Vera Cruz, and Sandoval alguacil-major of the same place.
  • CHAPTER XCVII. How we entertained and amused Motecusuma during his confinement, and granted him permission to visit his temple.
  • CHAPTER XCVIII. How Cortes orders two large brigantines to be built for the navigation of the lake of Mexico
  • Motecusuma begs permission to visit his temples to offer up his prayers there
  • and what Cortes said to him when he granted this permission.
  • CHAPTER XCIX. How our two brigantines are launched, and Motecusuma, expressing a wish to go a hunting, sails in one of these vessels to a river where he usually went for that purpose.
  • CHAPTER C. How the nephews of Motecusuma assembled the principal personages of the empire, and formed a conspiracy to rescue the monarch from confinement, and beat us out of the city.
  • CHAPTER CI. How the powerful Motecusuma, with several caziques and chief personages of the country, declare themselves vassals of our emperor
  • and of other occurrences which happened then.
  • CHAPTER CII. How Cortes sends out some of our men to explore the gold mines and those rivers which wash down gold
  • also the harbours from the Panuco to the Tabasco, but particularly the river Guacasualco.
  • CHAPTER CIII. How the officers whom Cortes had despatched to the gold mines and the river Guacasualc returned to Mexico.
  • CHAPTER CIV. How Cortes desired the powerful Motecusuma to order all the caziques of the empire to bring in the tribute of gold due to our emperor.
  • CHAPTER CV. How all the gold presented by Motecusuma, and collected from the different townships, was divided
  • and what happened to one of our soldiers on the occasion.
  • CHAPTER CVI. Of the high words which arose between Velasquez de Leon and our treasurer Gonzalo Mexia on account of the gold which was missing from the heap, and how Cortes put an end to that dispute.
  • CHAPTER CVII. How Motecusuma offers one of his daughters in marriage to Cortes, who accepts her, and pays her the attentions due to her high station.
  • CHAPTER CVIII. How the powerful Motecusuma acquaints Cortes that it is requisite for his safety to quit Mexico, with the whole of his men, as all the caziques and papas were upon the point of rising up in arms to destroy us all, in compliance with the advice given them by their gods: the steps which Cortes took upon this news.
  • CHAPTER CIX. How the governor of Cuba, Velasquez, in all haste fits out an armament against us, the command of which he gives to Pamfilo de Narvaez, who was accompanied by the licentiate Lucas Vazquez de Aillon, auditor of the royal court of audience at St. Domingo.
  • CHAPTER CX. How Narvaez arrives with the whole of his flotilla in the harbour of San Juan de Ulua, and what happened upon this.
  • CHAPTER CXI. How Pamfilo Narvaez despatches five persons to Sandoval, the commandant of Vera Cruz, with summons to surrender up the town to him.
  • CHAPTER CXII. How Cortes, after he had gained every information respecting the armament, wrote to Narvaez, and several of his acquaintances who had come with him, and particularly to Andreas du Duero, private secretary to Velasquez
  • and of other events.
  • CHAPTER CXIII. The high words which arose between the auditor Vazquez de Aillon and Narvaez, who orders him to be seized and sent back prisoner to Spain.
  • CHAPTER CXIV. Narvaez marches, with the whole of his troops, to Sempoalla
  • his proceedings there
  • and how we in Mexico determine to march against him.
  • CHAPTER CXV. How the powerful Motecusuma inquires of Cortes whether it was really his intention to march out against Narvaez, though the latter's troops were double the number of ours.
  • CHAPTER CXVI. How we determined once more to despatch father Olmedo to Narvaez's head-quarters, and what we commissioned him to say.
  • CHAPTER CXVII. How father Olmedo arrived in Narvaez's head-quarters at Sempoalla, and what he did there.
  • CHAPTER CXVIII. How Cortes reviews the whole of his troops, and we are supplied with two hundred and fifty very long new lances, by the Tchinantecs.
  • CHAPTER CXIX. How Duero, with the soldier Usagre and two of his Indian servants from Cuba arrived in our camp
  • who this Duero was, and the reason of his visit, &c.
  • CHAPTER CXX. How Juan Velasquez arrives in Narvaez's head-quarters, and what took place there.
  • CHAPTER CXXI. What took place in Narvaez's quarters after the return to our camp of the ambassadors we had sent there.
  • CHAPTER CXXII. The order of our march against Narvaez
  • the speech Cortes made to us
  • and our reply to it.
  • CHAPTER CXXIII. How the 2000 Indians of Chinantla, whom Cortes had demanded of the caziques there, arrived at Sempoalla after Narvaez's defeat.
  • CHAPTER CXXIV. How Cortes despatches Francisco de Lugo, with two men who had formerly been ship-builders, to the harbour where Narvaez's flotilla lay, to bring all the captains and pilots of the vessels to Sempoalla.
  • CHAPTER CXXV. How we all, including Narvaez's troops, hasten to Mexico by forced marches.
  • CHAPTER CXXVI. How the Mexicans made war upon us, and the battles we fought with them.
  • CHAPTER CXXVII. Cortes determines to announce Motecusuma's death to the Mexican generals and chiefs who are at war with us.
  • CHAPTER CXXVIII. How we come to the determination of leaving Mexico secretly at night
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CXXIX. How we quartered ourselves in the metropolis of Tlascalla, and what we did there.
  • CHAPTER CXXX. How we marched into the province of Tepeaca, what we did there, and of other things which happened.
  • CHAPTER CXXXI. How a vessel, which had been sent by Diego Velasquez from Cuba, arrived at Vera Cruz, commanded by the captain Pedro Barba, and the manner in which Caballero captured her.
  • CHAPTER CXXXII. How the inhabitants of Quauhquechola called upon Cortes, and begged of him to drive out the Mexican troops from their town, as they were plundered and ill-used by them.
  • CHAPTER CXXXIII. How one of the vessels which Francisco de Garay had fitted out for the object of forming settlements on the river Panuco, put in at Vera Cruz, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CXXXIV. How Cortes despatches Sandoval with 200 men, among which were twenty horse and twelve crossbow-men, to punish the tribes of Xalatzinco and Zacatemi, for having put some Spaniards to death, and to demand restitution of the gold they had robbed us of
  • and also further to explore the country.
  • CHAPTER CXXXV. How all the slaves we had taken in Tepeaca, Quauhquechola, Tecalco, and Castilblanco, were brought together in our head-quarters, and branded with an iron, in his majesty's name.
  • CHAPTER CXXXVI. How the chief officers and principal personages of Narvaez's troops request leave to return to Cuba, which Cortes grants, and they accordingly leave
  • also how our general sends ambassadors to Spain, St. Domingo, and Jamaica.
  • VOLUME II.
  • CHAPTER CXXXVII. How the whole of us marched towards Tezcuco, and what happened to us on our way there.
  • CHAPTER CXXXVIII. How we marched against Iztapalapan
  • Cortes taking along with him Alvarado and Oli
  • while Sandoval was left behind to protect Tezcuco.
  • CHAPTER CXXXIX. How ambassadors arrive in Tezcuco from three neighbouring townships, to sue for peace, and to beg forgiveness for the murder of several Spaniards who had fallen into their hands
  • and how Sandoval marched to Chalco and Tlalmanalco, to assist the inhabitants there against the Mexicans.
  • CHAPTER CXL. How Sandoval marches to Tlascalla in order to fetch the woodwork for building the brigantines, and what happened to him in a place which we termed the Moorish town.
  • CHAPTER CXLI. How Cortes marches against the town of Xaltocan, which lay in the midst of the lake, about twenty-four miles from Mexico, and from thence proceeds to other townships.
  • CHAPTER CXLII. How the captain Sandoval marches to Chalco and Tlalmanalco, and what he did there.
  • CHAPTER CXLIII. How we marked our slaves at Tezcuco with a red-hot iron, and received intelligence that a vessel had run into Vera Cruz.
  • CHAPTER CXLIV. How Cortes made a hostile excursion to all the cities and larger townships which lay round about the lake, and what happened on that occasion.
  • CHAPTER CXLV. The terrible thirst we suffered on our further march
  • our dangerous position at Xochimilco, and the many battles we fought there with the Mexicans, until our return to Tezcuco.
  • CHAPTER CXLVI. How we discover, on our return to Tezcuco, that a conspiracy had been set on foot by the men of Narvaez's troops to murder Cortes, and all who were of his party
  • of the author of this conspiracy, his punishment
  • and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CXLVII. How Cortes issues orders to the inhabitants of all the townships in the neighbourhood of Tezcuco which were allied with us, to furnish us with arrows and copper points for the same, and what further took place at our head-quarters.
  • CHAPTER CXLVIII. How Cortes reviews the whole of his troops at Tezcuco
  • and of his further dispositions for conducting the siege of Mexico.
  • CHAPTER CXLIX. The manner in which Cortes selects the men who were to row the brigantines
  • of the commanders who were appointed to each, and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CL. Of Cortes' further dispositions for the siege.
  • CHAPTER CLI. How Cortes assigns particular stations to the twelve brigantines, the thirteenth being considered unfit for service.
  • CHAPTER CLII. How the Mexicans defeated Cortes, and took sixty-two of his men prisoners, who were sacrificed to their idols
  • our general himself being wounded in the leg.
  • CHAPTER CLIII. The new plan of operation which we adopt in the siege, and how all our allies return to their several homes.
  • CHAPTER CLIV. How Cortes offers terms of peace to Quauhtemoctzin.
  • CHAPTER CLV. How Gonzalo de Sandoval marches against the provinces which had sent their troops to cooperate with Quauhtemoctzin.
  • CHAPTER CLVI. How Quauhtemoctzin was taken prisoner.
  • CHAPTER CLVII. How Cortes orders the aqueduct of Chapultepec to be restored
  • and of various other matters.
  • CHAPTER CLVIII. How a certain Christobal de Tapia arrived in Vera Cruz, with the appointment of governor of New Spain.
  • CHAPTER CLIX. How Cortes and the officers of the crown forward to Spain the wardrobe of Motecusuma, and the emperor's share of the booty
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CLX. How Sandoval arrives in the town of Tustepec, what he did there
  • his march to the river Guacasualco, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CLXI. How Alvarado marches to the province of Tutepec, to build a town there
  • and how far he succeeded in subduing the country, and in founding a colony.
  • CHAPTER CLXII. How Francisco de Garay arrives with an extensive armament in the river Panuco
  • how far he was successful
  • and of many other circumstances.
  • CHAPTER CLXIII. How the licentiate Zuazo set sail for New Spain in a small vessel, accompanied by two monks of the order of Charity
  • and their remarkable adventures on this voyage.
  • CHAPTER CLXIV. How Cortes despatched Alvarado to subdue the province of Guatimala, and to found a colony there.
  • CHAPTER CLXV. How Cortes despatches an armament, under Christobal de Oli, to the Higueras and Honduras, to subject these provinces
  • and what further took place during this expedition.
  • CHAPTER CLXVI. How we who were left behind in Guacasualco were constantly occupied in tranquillising the rebellious provinces
  • how Luis Marin, by command of Cortes, marches into Chiapa, to subject that province
  • myself and father Juan de las Varillas being particularly desired by Cortes to join him in this campaign.
  • CHAPTER CLXVII. How our agents in Spain brought certain accusations against the bishop of Burgos, and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CLXVIII. How Narvaez, Christobal de Tapia, the pilot Umbria, and the soldier Cardenas, bring heavy accusations against Cortes, at the instigation of the bishop of Burgos, and what judgment his majesty pronounced.
  • CHAPTER CLXIX. Of Cortes' plans after he had obtained the appointment of governor of New Spain
  • the way in which he distributes the Indians
  • and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CLXX. How Cortes sends a present to his majesty
  • 80,000 pesos in gold and silver, besides a magnificent field-piece made of silver and gold, covered with various beautiful figures
  • also how he sends his father Martin Cortes above 5000 pesos.
  • CHAPTER CLXXI. How twelve monks of the order of St. Francis, with the vicar-general and father-superior Martin de Valencia, arrive at Vera Cruz, and how they are received by Cortes.
  • CHAPTER CLXXII. How Cortes sends his majesty 30,000 pesos worth of gold, with an account of the conversion of the Indians, the rebuilding of the city of Mexico, and of the expedition of Christobal de Oli to the Honduras
  • also how the vessel which conveyed this gold at the same time carried secret letters to Spain, written by the royal accountant Rodrigo de Albornoz, in which Cortes and the whole of the veteran Conquistadores were calumniated in the vilest manner.
  • CHAPTER CLXXIII. How Cortes sent out a captain, named Francisco de las Casas against Christobal de Oli, on receiving intelligence that this officer had made common cause with Diego Velasquez, and had renounced all further obedience to him.
  • CHAPTER CLXXIV. How Cortes himself marches at the head of his troops to the Honduras in search of Christobal de Oli
  • of the officers and men he selected on this occasion, and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CLXXV. How we commence our march from Guacasualco, and the terrible fatigues and hardship we had to undergo for the space of two years and three months.
  • CHAPTER CLXXVI. How Cortes on our arrival at Ciguatepec despatches Francisco de Medina in search of Simon de Cuenca, with orders for the latter to repair with the two vessels to Triunfo de la Cruz
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CLXXVII. Cortes' further plans after his arrival among the Acallan townships
  • how he orders the powerful cazique of Mexico Quauhtemoctzin, and the king of Tlacupa, to be hung
  • his reasons for doing this
  • and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CLXXVIII. We continue our march, and what further happened to us.
  • CHAPTER CLXXIX. How Cortes entered the town founded by Gil Gonsalez de Avila
  • the great joy of the inhabitants at his arrival, and what he further did there.
  • CHAPTER CLXXX. How eighty of us on the second day after our arrival in Buena Vista, marched out under the command of Luis Marin to explore the country and to search for provisions.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXI. How Cortes embarks, with the soldiers who accompanied him on this expedition, and with all the inhabitants of Buena Vista, for Puerto de Caballos, where he founds a colony, to which he gives the name of Natividad.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXII. Sandoval commences to subdue the province of Naco, and the opposition he meets with from the natives.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXIII. How Cortes disembarks in the harbour of Truxillo, and the inhabitants rejoice at his arrival.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXIV. How Sandoval, during our stay at Naco, takes forty Spanish soldiers with their captain prisoners, who, on their march from the province of Nicaragua, had everywhere plundered and otherwise ill-used the inhabitants.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXV. How Cortes receives a letter from the licentiate Zuazo out of the Havannah, and of its contents.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXVI. How Pedro Arias de Avila is apprized by two of his confidants that Francisco Hernandez was in close correspondence with Cortes, and about to declare his independence of him
  • the steps which Arias took upon this.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXVII. How Cortes, after setting sail, was twice obliged to put back into the harbour of Truxillo
  • and what further happened.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXVIII. How Cortes despatches one of his servants, named Martin de Orantes to Mexico, with letters to Francisco de las Casas and Pedro de Alvarado, in which he empowers them to take upon themselves the chief government of New Spain
  • but in case they were absent he conferred the same power on Estrada and Albornoz.
  • CHAPTER CLXXXIX. How the treasurer, with several other cavaliers, requested the Franciscan monks to despatch father Diego de Altamirano, a relation of Cortes, to Truxillo, to desire our general to hasten his departure for Mexico.
  • CHAPTER CXC. Cortes sets sail from the Havannah, and has a favorable passage to Vera Cruz, where he is received with the greatest rejoicings.
  • CHAPTER CXCI. How the licentiate Luis Ponce de Leon, who was commissioned to make inquiries into Cortes' government of New Spain, arrives in the harbour of San Juan de Ulua.
  • CHAPTER CXCII. How the licentiate commences the investigation against Cortes, and all those persons who had filled judicial offices
  • and how he fell ill shortly after and died.
  • CHAPTER CXCIII. How after the death of Ponce de Leon, Marcos de Aguilar assumes the government
  • the disputes which arose in consequence, and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CXCIV. Marcos de Aguilar dies, and in his will appoints the treasurer Alonso de Estrada governor
  • and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CXCV. How Cortes receives letters from the Cardinal de Siguenza, then president of the council of the Indies, and from several other cavaliers, advising him to repair to Spain without delay
  • the death of his father Martin Cortes
  • and of other matters.
  • CHAPTER CXCVI. How the royal court of audience arrive in Mexico during Cortes' stay in Spain, and what their first occupations were.
  • CHAPTER CXCVII. How Nuño de Guzman, on the intelligence that the emperor had cashiered the royal court of audience, determines to subdue the province of Xalisco, at present called New Galicia.
  • CHAPTER CXCVIII. The arrival of the new members of the royal court of audience in Mexico.
  • CHAPTER CXCIX. Cortes returns to New Spain as marquis del Valle Oaxaca, and captain-general of New Spain and of the South Sea, accompanied by his wife Doña Maria de Zuniga, and father Leguizamo and other monks.
  • CHAPTER CC. Of the vast expenses to which the marquis Hernando Cortes put himself in fitting out the expeditions to the South Sea, and of their unfortunate termination.
  • CHAPTER CCI. Of the great festivities which took place in Mexico on account of the peace which was concluded between our emperor and the king of France
  • and of Cortes' second journey to Spain.
  • CHAPTER CCII. How the viceroy sends out a squadron of three vessels into the South Sea to the assistance of Francisco Vasquez Coronado, in the conquest of Cibola.
  • CHAPTER CCIII. Of a very extensive armament which was fitted out by Alvarado in the year 1537.
  • CHAPTER CCIV. What befel the marquis del Valle on his second visit to Spain.
  • CHAPTER CCV. Of the brave officers and soldiers who sailed from the island of Cuba with the fortunate and spirited captain Hernando Cortes, afterwards marquis del Valle.
  • CHAPTER CCVI. Of the stature and outward person of several brave officers and soldiers, and of their age when they first joined Cortes.
  • CHAPTER CCVII. Of the great merit which is due to us, the true Conquistadores.
  • CHAPTER CCVIII. Of the human sacrifices and abominations practised by the inhabitants of New Spain
  • how we abolished these, and introduced the holy Christian faith into the country.
  • CHAPTER CCIX. How we introduced the Christian religion among the Indians
  • of their conversion and baptism
  • and of the different trades we taught them.
  • CHAPTER CCX. Of other advantages which arose from our glorious conquests.
  • CHAPTER CCXI. The deliberations which took place at Valladolid in the year 1550, in the royal council of the Indies, respecting the distribution of Indians in perpetuity.
  • CHAPTER CCXII. Of various remarks which were made respecting my history, which the reader will be pleased to hear.
  • CHAPTER CCXIII. Of the planets and signs in the heavens which prognosticated our arrival in New Spain
  • how these were interpreted by the Mexicans
  • and of other matters.

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