A History of Medicine

 
 
Routledge (Verlag)
  • erschienen am 15. Januar 2019
  • |
  • 1295 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-429-67241-5 (ISBN)
 

Originally published in 1941, A History of Medicine provides a detailed and comprehensive guide to the advancement of medicine, from Ancient Egypt, and Ancient Babylonia, all the way up to the 20th century. The book looks at the close relationship between the progress of medicine and its advancement of civilization, it covers the development of medicine from, old magical rites, religious creeds, classical Hippocratism and revolutionary discoveries, while looking at the associated economic, intellectual, and political conditions of life in different nations, during different times. The book provides an essential and detailed look at the rich history of medicine and how it has impacted society.

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  • Cover
  • Half Title
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Book by the same author
  • Original Title Page
  • Original Copyright Page
  • Dedication Page
  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Author's Preface
  • Editor's Preface
  • Contents
  • Chapter I. Medical Thought in Its Historical Evolution
  • 1. Origins and Traditions of the History of Medicine
  • 2. The History of Ideas
  • 3. The History of Facts
  • 4. The Biographic History
  • Chapter II. The Origin of Medicine in Prehistory and in Primitive Peoples. Empiric, Demonistic, Animistic, Magic Medicine
  • 1. Prehistoric Evidence of Disease
  • 2. Instinctive and Empirical Medicine
  • 3. Magic Medicine
  • 4. Natural and Empirical Primitive Surgery
  • 5. Priestly Medicine
  • Chapter III. Mesopotamian Medicine. Magic and Priestly Medicine
  • 1. Medical Concepts of the Most Ancient Civilizations
  • 2. Astrologic Concepts
  • 3. Babylonian and Assyrian Medicine
  • 4 . Medical Concepts and the Practice of Medicine
  • Chapter IV. Old Egyptian Medicine. Priestly Medicine, Origins of the Philosophic Concept
  • 1. The Origins of Egyptian Medicine
  • 2. Medicine and Surgery according to the Ancient Texts
  • 3. Hygienic Legislation
  • 4. Professional Practice
  • 5. Characteristics of Egyptian Medicine
  • Chapter V. The Medicine of the People of Israel. Theurgic Medicine. Canonical Codifications of Sanitary Laws
  • 1. Fundamental Concepts of Jewish Medicine
  • 2. Sanitary Legislation
  • 3. Medical Practice and Therapeutics
  • 4. The Medicine of the Talmud
  • 5. Jewish Medicine as Essentially Theurgic
  • Chapter VI. The Medicine of Ancient Persia and India. Systematic Theories
  • 1. Oriental Civilizations and Their Migrations. The Medicine of Ancient Persia
  • 2. Essential Features of Indian Medicine and the Various Stages of Its Development
  • 3. Indian Surgery
  • 4. Hygiene. Indian Medicine as a Systematized Discipline
  • Chapter VII. Far Eastern Medicine. Systems of Scholastic Medicine
  • 1. Origins and Characteristics of Chinese Medicine
  • 2. The Practice of Medicine - Spread of Chinese Medicine through Korea to Japan
  • Chapter VIII. The Medicine of Ancient Greece. The Temples and Cult of Æsculapius-the Greco-Italian Schools-the Dawn of Scientific Medicine
  • 1. Origin of Greek Medicine
  • 2. Homeric Medicine
  • 3. Mythical and Priestly Medicine - the Cult of Æsculapius
  • 4. The Dawn of Scientific Medicine - Early Philosophic Schools
  • 5. Biologic Concepts and Medicine of the Greco-Italic School: Pythagoras, Alcmaeon, Philolaus, Heraclitus, Empedocles, and Their Pupils
  • 6. Medical Schools and the Practice of Medicine -Their Development Independently of Priestly Medicine
  • Chapter IX. The Golden Age of Greek Medicine. Hippocratic Medicine -A Biologic and Synthetic Concept
  • 1. Hippocrates - Biographical Data - The Hippocratic Writings
  • 2. The Ethical Books of the Hippocratic Corpus
  • 3. Biology, Anatomy, Physiology - the Doctrine of Humoral Pathology
  • 4. Constitutional Pathology
  • 5. Diagnosis and Prognosis - the Aphorisms
  • 6. Surgery, Ophthalmology, Obstetrics
  • 7. Hippocratic Therapeutics. The Healing Power of Nature
  • 8. Essential Characteristics of Hippocratic Medicine
  • 9. Hippocratic Medicine and Priestly Medicine
  • Chapter X. Post-Hippocratic Medicine. The Alexandrian School. Beginnings of Anatomical and Physiological Studies
  • 1. Medicine after Hippocrates. Aristotle
  • 2. Medicine of the Alexandrian Period. Herophilus, Erasistratus, the Empiric School
  • Chapter XI. Roman Medicine. The Latin Concept of Medicine and Sanitary Legislation
  • 1. Etruscan Medicine
  • 2. Roman Medical Mythology
  • 3. Roman Medicine in the Times of the Kings and of the Republic
  • 4. Medicine during the Empire
  • 5. Celsus and Pliny
  • 6. The Pneumatic and Eclectic Schools. Rufus, Aretxus, Dioscorides
  • 7. Galen
  • 8. Public Hygiene
  • 9 . Professional Practice. Status of the Physician
  • 10. Essential Characteristics of Roman Medicine
  • Chapter XII. The Decadence of Medical Science. Christian Dogmatic Medicine. The Byzantine School
  • 1. The Political Decadence of the Empire. The Great Epidemics
  • 2. Christian Dogmatic Medicine
  • 3. Post-Galenic Medical Literature
  • 4. Byzantine Medicine. Oribasius, Alexander of Tralles, Paul of Ægina
  • 5. Characteristics of Byzantine Medicine. The Decadence of Scientific Medicine
  • Chapter XIII. Arabian Medicine. Lay Medicine. Renaissance of Classic Doctrines
  • 1. Origins of Arabian Medicine
  • 2. First Period
  • 3. The Flourishing Period of Arabian Medicine
  • 4. Period of Decadence of Arabian Medicine
  • 5. The Teaching and Practice of Medicine
  • Chapter XIV. Medicine in the Christian West during the First Centuries of the Middle Ages. From Monastic Medicine to the Lay Medicine of Salerno
  • 1. Greco-Roman Traditions and the Medicine of Western Europe
  • 2. The School of Salerno. First Period
  • 3. The Golden Period of the Salernitan School. Arabian Currents
  • 4. Evolution of Medixval Medicine. Decadence of the School of Salerno
  • Chapter XV. Medicine in the Later Middle Ages. The Universities and Humanism. The Precursors of the Renaissance
  • 1. Cultural Currents in the Beginning of the Thirteenth Century
  • 2. The Universities. Arabism and Scholasticism
  • 3. Bologna, Montpellier, and Oxford
  • 4. Anatomical Teaching
  • 5. Medical Teaching
  • 6. Plague in the Fourteenth Century. Other Epidemic Diseases. Sanitary Legislation
  • 7. The Fifteenth Century and Humanism. Medico-Hygienic Literature. The Herbals
  • 8. Progress of Anatomy and Surgery in the Fifteenth Century
  • 9. Pharmacology in the Fifteenth Century
  • 10. The Study and Practice of Medicine at the End of the Middle Ages
  • 11. The Practice of Medicine, Surgery, and Pharmacy
  • Chapter XVI. The Renaissance. The Revival of Anatomy and Physiology. Biological and Clinical Trends
  • 1. Factors Contributing to the Renaissance of Medicine
  • 2. The Renaissance of Anatomy
  • 3. The Beginnings of Physiology- The Discovery of the Circulation of the Blood
  • 4. Concepts of Disease
  • 5. Contagious Diseases. Syphilis. Sweating Sickness. Exanthematic Typhus. Sanitary Legislation
  • 6. Surgery, Obstetrics, and Ophthalmology
  • 7. Pharmacology
  • 8. The Study and Practice of Renaissance Medicine
  • Chapter XVII. The Seventeenth Century. Dawn of Scientific Liberty. Biological and Experimental Trends in Medicine
  • 1. Evolution of Philosophical and Medical Thought in the Seventeenth Century. Great Discoveries. Academies
  • 2. Anatomy and Physiology
  • 3. Iatrophysical (Iatromechanical, Iatromathematical), Iatrochemical Schools. Beginnings of Experimental Research
  • 4. Clinical Medicine
  • 5. Surgery
  • 6. Obstetrics and Gynxcology
  • 7. Legal Medicine
  • 8. Pharmacology
  • 9. Epidemics. Progress in Hygiene
  • 10. Medical Teaching and the Social Position of Physicians
  • Chapter XVIII. The Eighteenth Century. From Speculative Systems to Pathological and Clinical Concepts
  • 1. General Considerations
  • 2. Medical Systems
  • 3. Anatomy
  • 3a. Pathological Anatomy
  • 4. Physiology
  • 5. Clinical Medicine
  • 6. Surgery
  • 7. Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 8. Ophthalmology
  • 9. Psychiatry and Legal Medicine
  • 10. Hygiene and Social Medicine
  • 11. Therapeutics and Pharmacology
  • 12. The Study and Practice of Medicine
  • Chapter XIX. First Half of the Nineteenth Century. Experimental and Biological Concepts. The Cell Doctrine
  • 1. General Considerations
  • 2. Anatomy
  • 3. Physiology
  • 4. Pathology
  • 5. Clinical Medicine
  • 6. Surgery
  • 7. Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 8. Ophthalmology
  • 9. Otology and Laryngology
  • 10. Dermatology and Syphilology
  • 11. Psychiatry and Neurology
  • 12. Legal Medicine
  • 13. Therapeutics
  • 14. Hygiene and Social Medicine
  • 15. History of Medicine
  • 16. The Teaching and Practice of Medicine
  • Chapter XX. The Second Half of the Nineteenth Century. Clinical Medicine Based on the Fundamental Sciences. Growth of the Specialties
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Biology
  • 3. Anatomy
  • 4. Physiology
  • 5. Biochemistry
  • 6. Pathology
  • 7. Microbiology
  • 8. Internal Medicine
  • 9. Surgery
  • 10. Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 11. Pediatrics
  • 12. Ophthalmology
  • 13. Otology, Laryngology, Rhinology
  • 14. Urology
  • 15. Dermatology and Syphilology
  • 16. Orthopedics
  • 17. Stomatology and Odontology (Dentistry)
  • 18. Neurology and Psychiatry
  • 19. Legal Medicine
  • 20. Pharmacology and Therapeutics (including Physiotherapy)
  • 21. Military Medicine
  • 22. Public Health
  • 23.The Study and Practice of Medicine
  • Chapter XXI. The Twentieth Century
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Biology
  • 3. Anatomy
  • 4. Physiology
  • 5. Biochemistry
  • 6. Pathology
  • 7. Microbiology
  • 8. Internal Medicine
  • 9. Surgery
  • 10. Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 11. Pediatrics
  • 12. Ophthalmology
  • 13. Otology, Laryngology, Rhinology
  • 14. Urology
  • 15. Dermatology and Syphilology
  • 16. Orthopedics
  • 17. Stomatology and Odontology (Dentistry)
  • 18. Neurology and Psychiatry
  • 19. Legal Medicine
  • 20. Pharmacology and Therapeutics
  • 21. Roentgenology, Radiology
  • 22. Military Medicine
  • 23. Nursing
  • 24. Public Health and Social Medicine
  • 25. History of Medicine
  • 26. The Study and Practice of Medicine
  • 27. Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index of Subjects
  • Index of Persons

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