Smart Buildings

Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology to Improve Energy-Efficiency and Environmental Performance
 
 
Woodhead Publishing
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 27. Mai 2016
  • |
  • 384 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-08-100640-5 (ISBN)
 

Smart Buildings: Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology to Improve Energy Efficiency and Environmental Performance presents a thorough analysis of the latest advancements in construction materials and building design that are applied to maximize building efficiency in both new and existing buildings.

After a brief introduction on the issues concerning the design process in the third millennium, Part One examines the differences between Zero Energy, Green, and Smart Buildings, with particular emphasis placed on the issue of smart buildings and smart housing, mainly the 'envelope' and how to make it more adaptive with the new possibilities offered by nanotechnology and smart materials.

Part Two focuses on the last generation of solutions for smart thermal insulation. Based on the results of extensive research into more innovative insulation materials, chapters discuss achievements in nanotechnology, bio-ecological, and phase-change materials. The technical characteristics, performance level, and methods of use for each are described in detail, as are the achievements in the field of green walls and their use as a solution for upgrading the energy efficiency and environmental performance of existing buildings.

Finally, Part Three reviews current research on smart windows, with the assumption that transparent surfaces represent the most critical element in the energy balance of the building. Chapters provide an extensive review on the technical features of transparent closures that are currently on the market or under development, from so-called dynamic glazing to bio-adaptive and photovoltaic glazing. The aesthetic potential and performance limits are also be discussed.


  • Presents valuable definitions that are given to explain the characteristics, requirements, and differences between 'zero energy', 'green' and 'smart' buildings
  • Contains particular focus on the next generation of construction materials and the most advanced products currently entering the market
  • Lists both the advantages and disadvantages to help the reader choose the most suitable solution
  • Takes into consideration both design and materials aspects
  • Promotes the existence of new advanced materials providing technical information to encourage further use and reduce costs compared to more traditional materials


Marco Casini has been a Professor of Architecture Technology and of Environmental Certification of Buildings at 'Sapienza" University of Rome since 2002. He is Scientific Director of the Editorial Board of the Journal 'Ponte' and a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture, David Publishing, NY. He is also a member of the Inter-regional Working Group for Sustainable Construction at the Italian Institute for Innovation and Transparency in Government Procurement and Environmental Compatibility. He carries out research in the fields of zero energy, green and smart buildings and nanotechnologies, smart materials and renewable energy for buildings. He has written many essays, articles and proceedings and is the author of 'Designing the efficiency of buildings: Certification of energy and environmental sustainability' (Roma, DEI, 2013), 'Building the environment: Tools and methods of environmental design' (Milano, Edizioni Ambiente, 2009), and 'EMAS Eco-Management and Audit Scheme' (Milano, IlSole24Ore, 2004).
  • Englisch
  • Cambridge
Elsevier Science
  • 12,37 MB
978-0-08-100640-5 (9780081006405)
0081006403 (0081006403)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Smart Buildings
  • Related titles
  • Smart Buildings
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil and Structural Engineering
  • About the author
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • One - Smart buildings
  • 1 - Designing the third millennium's buildings
  • 1.1 Buildings as a key part of the energy and environmental system
  • 1.2 Smart, sustainable, and inclusive buildings
  • 1.3 Zero-energy buildings
  • 1.3.1 Definition and concepts
  • 1.3.2 Strategies
  • 1.3.2.1 Typological-level measures
  • 1.3.2.2 Technical and construction-level measures
  • 1.3.2.3 Technological-level measures
  • 1.3.2.4 Sociocultural-level measures
  • 1.3.3 Building-integrated photovoltaics
  • 1.4 Green buildings
  • 1.4.1 Green building products
  • 1.4.2 Green building rating systems
  • 1.5 Smart buildings
  • 1.5.1 Smart envelope
  • 1.5.2 Smart systems
  • 1.5.2.1 Internet of things
  • 1.6 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • 2 - Advanced materials for architecture
  • 2.1 Building materials classification
  • 2.2 Nanotechnology
  • 2.2.1 Definition and concepts
  • 2.2.2 Classification
  • 2.2.2.1 Nanoplates
  • 2.2.2.2 Nanostructured materials
  • 2.2.3 Manufacturing processes
  • 2.2.4 Applications in energy, environmental, and construction sectors
  • 2.2.5 Nanoproducts for architecture
  • 2.2.5.1 Concrete
  • 2.2.5.2 Metals
  • 2.2.5.3 Plastics
  • 2.2.5.4 Ceramics
  • 2.2.5.5 Glazing
  • 2.2.5.6 Insulating materials
  • 2.2.5.7 Adhesives
  • 2.2.5.8 Paints
  • 2.2.5.9 Lighting
  • 2.2.5.10 Photovoltaics
  • 2.2.5.11 Building and environmental monitoring and control systems
  • 2.3 Smart materials
  • 2.3.1 Property-changing materials
  • 2.3.2 Energy-exchanging materials
  • 2.4 3D printing for architecture
  • 2.5 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • Two - Smart insulation
  • 3 - Building insulating materials
  • 3.1 Heat transfer physics
  • 3.2 Classification and thermal properties
  • 3.3 Functional model and building facade applications
  • 3.3.1 Insulation on the outside
  • 3.3.2 Insulation on the inside
  • 3.3.3 Insulation inside cavity walls
  • 3.3.4 Ventilated walls
  • 3.3.5 Advanced pitched roofs
  • 3.3.6 Thermal reflective surfaces
  • 3.4 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • 4 - Advanced insulating materials
  • 4.1 Nanoporous insulating materials: aerogels
  • 4.1.1 Origin and properties
  • 4.1.2 Preparation method
  • 4.1.3 Insulating products
  • 4.1.4 Building applications
  • 4.1.4.1 Floors and roofs
  • 4.1.4.2 Perimeter walls
  • 4.1.4.3 Thermal bridge correction
  • 4.1.4.4 Low-temperature heating
  • 4.1.4.5 Tensile membranes
  • 4.1.4.6 Appliances
  • 4.2 Vacuum insulating panels
  • 4.2.1 Specifications and performance
  • 4.2.1.1 Modified atmosphere insulation panels
  • 4.2.1.2 Future developments
  • 4.2.2 Building applications
  • 4.2.2.1 Floors and roofs
  • 4.2.2.2 Walls
  • 4.2.2.3 Other uses
  • 4.3 Biobased insulating materials
  • 4.4 Transparent insulating materials
  • 4.5 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • 5 - Phase-change materials
  • 5.1 Thermal mass and latent heat storage
  • 5.2 Classification and technical specifications
  • 5.2.1 Inorganic phase-change materials
  • 5.2.2 Organic phase-change materials
  • 5.3 Packaging and encapsulation methods
  • 5.3.1 Macroencapsulation
  • 5.3.2 Microencapsulation
  • 5.4 Functional model and building design
  • 5.5 Building applications and products
  • 5.5.1 Inner lining of walls
  • 5.5.2 Heavyweight construction buildings with added interior insulation
  • 5.5.3 Ceilings
  • 5.5.4 Floors
  • 5.5.5 Exterior walls/roof linings
  • 5.5.6 Use in glazing
  • 5.5.7 Structural concrete
  • 5.5.8 Use in mechanical systems
  • 5.6 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • 6 - Advanced building skin
  • 6.1 Cool roofs
  • 6.1.1 Standards and regulations
  • 6.1.2 Products and specifications
  • 6.1.3 Emerging technologies
  • 6.1.3.1 Radiative sky cooling
  • 6.1.3.2 Thermochromic cool roofs
  • 6.1.3.3 PCM color coatings
  • 6.1.3.4 Lenticular cool roof
  • 6.2 Green walls
  • 6.3 Environment-adaptive skin facades
  • 6.3.1 SABER breathing facade
  • 6.3.2 Thermobimetal
  • 6.3.3 Passive deployable insulation
  • 6.3.4 Water-reacting facade
  • 6.3.5 Hydromembrane
  • 6.3.6 Hydroceramic
  • 6.3.7 Cool bricks
  • 6.3.8 TiO2 photocatalyst evaporative shell
  • 6.4 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • Three - Smart windows
  • 7 - Advanced insulation glazing
  • 7.1 Advanced low-emission glazing
  • 7.2 Suspended film glazing
  • 7.3 Vacuum insulating glass
  • 7.4 Monolithic aerogel insulating glazing
  • 7.5 Advanced window frames
  • 7.6 Glazed double-skin facades
  • 7.7 Heating glazing
  • 7.8 Fire-resistant glazing
  • 7.9 ETFE transparent closures
  • 7.10 Conclusions and future development
  • References
  • 8 - Light and solar control glazing and systems
  • 8.1 Antireflective glazing
  • 8.2 Self-cleaning glazing
  • 8.2.1 Superhydrophobic nanotechnological glazing
  • 8.2.2 Superhydrophilic photocatalytic glazing
  • 8.3 Light-redirection and optical systems
  • 8.3.1 Light-redirection louver systems
  • 8.3.2 Tubular solar conveyors
  • 8.3.3 Natural mimicking artificial light
  • 8.3.4 Transparent organic light-emitting diode windows
  • 8.4 Static solar protection glazing
  • 8.5 Advanced shading systems
  • 8.6 Conclusions and future development
  • References
  • 9 - Dynamic glazing
  • 9.1 Passive dynamic glazing
  • 9.1.1 Photochromic glazing
  • 9.1.2 Thermochromic glazing
  • 9.2 Active dynamic glazing
  • 9.2.1 Suspended particle devices
  • 9.2.2 PDLC devices
  • 9.2.3 Electrochromic devices
  • 9.2.4 Emerging technologies
  • 9.3 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • 10 - Energy-generating glazing
  • 10.1 Advanced photovoltaic glazing
  • 10.1.1 Crystalline silicon photovoltaic glazing
  • 10.1.2 Semitransparent thin-film PV glazing
  • 10.1.3 Organic photovoltaic glazing
  • 10.1.3.1 Organic solar cells
  • 10.1.3.2 Dye-sensitized solar cells
  • 10.1.3.3 Manufacturing and development scope
  • 10.1.4 Spherical cell photovoltaic glazing
  • 10.1.5 Prismatic optical cell photovoltaic glazing
  • 10.1.6 Transparent luminous solar collectors
  • 10.2 Bioadaptive glazing
  • 10.3 Conclusions and future trends
  • References
  • Index
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Z
  • Back Cover

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