Bubbles in Food 2

Novelty, Health and Luxury
 
 
Academic Press
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 11. Juni 2016
  • |
  • 100 Seiten
 
E-Book | ePUB mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF mit Adobe DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-0-12-810459-0 (ISBN)
 

Bubbles give novelty and distinctiveness to many food and drink products including the most important and interesting ones such as bread, beer, ice cream, whipped cream, soufflés and champagne. Understanding the creation and control of bubbles in food products is key to the success of the domestic chef or the industrial food manufacturer. This new volume presents the proceedings of the conference Bubbles in Food 2: Novelty, Health and Luxury. This book is fully updated and expanded from the original Bubbles in Food book published in 1999. This new title brings together up-to-date information on the latest developments in this fast moving area.

Bubbles in Food 2 includes novel experimental techniques for measuring and quantifying the aerated structure of foods (e.g. ultrasonics, MRI imaging, X-ray tomography, microscopy, rheology, image analysis), and novel analytical approaches for interpreting aerated food properties and behavior. These techniques and approaches provide stimulus for new product development or for enhancing the understanding of the manufacture of existing products, leading to enhanced quality and greater product differentiation. Bubbles in Food 2: Novelty, Health and Luxury aims to enhance the appreciation of aerated foods and to provide stimulation and cross fertilisation of ideas for the exploitation of bubbles as a novel and versatile food ingredient.

  • Englisch
  • San Diego
  • |
  • USA
Elsevier Science
  • 26,97 MB
978-0-12-810459-0 (9780128104590)
0128104597 (0128104597)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
  • Front Cover
  • Bubbles in Food 2: Novelty, Health and Luxury
  • Copyright Page
  • Table of Contents
  • Preface
  • Dedication
  • Chapter 1. A History of Aerated Foods
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Bread
  • 3. Chocolate
  • 4. Sugar Confectionery-Foam, Sweet Foam
  • 5. Dairy-Based Foams
  • 6. Egg-Based Foams
  • 7. Other Bakery Products
  • 8. Breakfast Cereals and Snack Products
  • 9. Beverages-Beer, Wine and Carbonated Soft Drinks
  • 10. Aerated Foods, History, Science and Technology
  • 11. Aerated Foods and Foam Science
  • 12. Summary
  • Acknowledgements
  • Bibliography
  • Part 1: Novel Processing
  • Chapter 2. The History of Aerated Chocolate
  • 1. What Is Aerated Chocolate?
  • 2. Background History to the Development of Aerated Chocolate
  • 3. Development and Launch, 1935-1938
  • 4. More Recent Developments
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Reference
  • Chapter 3. Study of the Dynamics and Size Distributions of Air Bubbles During Mixing in a Continuous Food Mixer
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions and Ongoing Work
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Pore Generation in Food Materials by Application of Microwave Energy Under Sub-atmospheric Pressure
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Part 2: Bubble Detection and Quantification
  • Chapter 5. Investigating the Bubble Size Distribution in Dough Using Ultrasound
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Model
  • 3. Material and Method
  • 4. Results and Discussion
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Quantifying the Morphology of Bread Crusts
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Experimental Approach
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Concluding Remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Fractal and Image Analysis of Mexican Sweet Bread Bubble Distribution: Influence of Fermentation and Mixing Time
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Quantification of the Structural Changes in Foams Stabilized by Proteins via Image Analysis
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Crumb Features Quantification by Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy Images
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 10. An Acoustic Sensor to Measure Bubbles in Food Foams to Monitor Production
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Batters
  • 3. Properties of the Batters to be Tested
  • 4. Acoustic Measurements
  • 5. Measurements in Pilot Plant
  • 6. Discussion and Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Structural Image Analysis of Food Foams and Aerated Food Products
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Why We Are Interested in Foam Structure?
  • 3. Length- and Time-Scales-Where to Attack the Problem?
  • 4. Liquid versus Solid Foams
  • 5. Physical Changes in Foam Structure
  • 6. Observation Techniques Used in the Analysis of Food Foams
  • 7. Image Analysis of Foams
  • 8. 2D and 3D Analysis
  • 9. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Part 3: Bubble Stability
  • Chapter 12. Drainage and Coarsening Effects on the Time-Dependent Rheology of Whole Egg and Egg White Foams and Batters
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Influence of pH on the Molecular Structure and Bubble Stabilising Properties of Bovine a-Lactalbumin
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Permeability of Bubbles Stabilized by Proteins
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Bubbles Rising in Line: Champagne, Lager, Cider
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Instability Revealed by Wake Vortices
  • 3. Surfactant Wake Stabilisation
  • 4. Bubble Repulsion due to Growth
  • 5. Results and Discussion
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Formation and Stability of Milk Foams
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Part 4: Sensory, Textural and Rheological Effectsof Bubbles in Food
  • Chapter 17. Characterization and Prediction of the Fracture Response of Solid Food Foams
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Effect of the Rheology of the Continuous Phase on Foaming Processes: Viscosity-Temperature Impact
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Foaming Kinetics Study of Molten Potato Starch Using a Cambridge Multi-Pass Rheometer (MPR)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Experimental Procedure
  • 3. Results
  • 4. Single-Bubble Growth Modelling
  • 5. Discussion and Conclusions
  • Nomenclature
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Part 5: Breadmaking: A Series of Aeration Operations
  • Chapter 20. Mixing Bread Doughs Under Highly Soluble Gas Atmospheres and the Effects on Bread Crumb Texture: Experimental Results and Theoretical Interpretation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Degassing of Dough Pieces During Sheeting
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Using Ultrasound to Probe Nucleation and Growth of Bubbles in Bread Dough and to Examine the Resulting Cellular Structure of Bread Crumb
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Impact of Freezing Rate of Bread Dough on Dough Expansion During Fermentation. Use of MRI to Assess Local Porosity
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and Methods-Experiments #1
  • 3. Results of Experiments #1: Gassing Power vs. Freezing Rate
  • 4. Material and Methods for Experiments #2
  • 5. Results for Experiments #2: Gassing Power vs. Freezing Rate
  • 6. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 24. Role of the Crust Formation on Local Expansion During Bread Baking
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 25. Coupled Heat and Mass Transfers in a Solid Foam with Water Phase Transitions: Application to a Model Foam and Bread
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. State of the Art
  • 3. Model
  • 4. Materials and Sample Preparation
  • 5. Results and Discussion
  • 6. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 26. In situ Fast X-ray Tomography Study of the Evolution of Cellular Structure in Bread Dough During Proving and Baking
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 27. X-ray Tomography of Structure Formation in Bread and Cakes During Baking
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 28. CO2 Release During Baking as a Response Parameter for Monitoring the Bubble Opening
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 29. Mechanism of Gas Cell Stability in Breadmaking
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 30. Bubbles in Bread: Is the Answer in the Genes?
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Part 6: Bubble Behaviour in High-Fibre Breads
  • Chapter 31. The Influence of Dietary Fibres on Bubble Development During Bread Making
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 32. Expansion Capacity of Bran-Enriched Doughs in Different Scales of Laboratory Mixers
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 33. Bran in Bread: Effects of Particle Size and Level of Wheat and Oat Bran on Mixing, Proving and Baking
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 34. Effect of Wheat Bran Particle Size on Aeration of Bread Dough During Mixing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • Part 7: Other Cereal-Based Foods
  • Chapter 35. Structural Basis and Process Requirements for Corn-Based Products Crispness
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 36. A Knowledge Base on Cereal Food Foams Processing and Behaviour
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Project Presentation. Use of the MASK Method
  • 3. Implementation of the Knowledge Management Approach
  • 4. Results, Deliverables
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 37. Aeration of Biscuit Doughs During Mixing
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 38. Mathematical Modelling of Crumpet Formation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and Methods
  • 3. Results and Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • References
  • Chapter 39. A History of Pizza
  • 1. Forensic Evidence
  • 2. Evolutionary Roots of Grasses and Humans
  • 3. Flat Hands for Stretching Dough
  • 4. Grinders of Grains
  • 5. Chew and Spit Technology
  • 6. The Spread of Cultivation of Grains
  • 7. Palatable Foods and Flat Breads
  • 8. The Bubble-Net of Yeast Leavened Dough
  • 9. The Technology of Flat Bread
  • 10. Pizza Revolutions
  • 11. Description of Pizza, Ancient and Modern
  • 12. An Artisan Definition
  • 13. Linguistic Roots and Variants of the Word "Pizza"
  • 14. Pizza Variants
  • 15. Technology, Marketing, Status Today
  • 16. Timeline A: Evolution of Grasses and Primates (65,000,000-500,000 BC)- Evolution of Grains and a Future Grain User
  • 17. Timeline B: Grains in Agriculture: 12,000 BC-2000 BC
  • 18. Timeline C: Etruscans to Roman Empire (930 BC-100 AD)
  • 19. Timeline D: Fall of Rome to the Rise of American Pizza (600-1950 AD)
  • 20. Timeline E: Technological and Demographic Trends from 1950-2006 AD 20.1. 1950-1970
  • 21. Summary
  • References
  • Index

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