Morphologie / Morphology / Morphologie / Morphology. 2. Halbband

Ein internationales Handbuch zur Flexion und Wortbildung /An International Handbook on Inflection and Word-Formation
 
 
De Gruyter Mouton (Verlag)
  • 1. Auflage
  • |
  • erschienen am 14. Juli 2008
  • |
  • XXI, 1000 Seiten
 
E-Book | PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book | PDF ohne DRM | Systemvoraussetzungen
978-3-11-019427-2 (ISBN)
 
Morphology is the study of linguistic forms. This handbook informs the reader on fundamental concepts and theoretical approaches of the discipline and on morphological structures of diverse languages. It aims to represent the current state of the art in morphology in a comprehensive fashion at a general level and is illustrated with many examples. Priority is given to a thorough explanation of established concepts and insights, complemented, where necessary, by an unbiased report on alternative problem solutions.
 
This series of HANDBOOKS OF LINGUISTICS AND COMMUNICATION SCIENCE is designed to illuminate a field which not only includes general linguistics and the study of linguistics as applied to specific languages, but also covers those more recent areas which have developed from the increasing body of research into the manifold forms of communicative action and interaction. For "classic" linguistics there appears to be a need for a review of the state of the art which will provide a reference base for the rapid advances in research undertaken from a variety of theoretical standpoints, while in the more recent branches of communication science the handbooks will give researchers both an verview and orientation. To attain these objectives, the series will aim for a standard comparable to that of the leading handbooks in other disciplines, and to this end will strive for comprehensiveness, theoretical explicitness, reliable documentation of data and findings, and up-to-date methodology. The editors, both of the series and of the individual volumes, and the individual contributors, are committed to this aim. The languages of publication are English, German, and French. The main aim of the series is to provide an appropriate account of the state of the art in the various areas of linguistics and communication science covered by each of the various handbooks; however no inflexible pre-set limits will be imposed on the scope of each volume. The series is open-ended, and can thus take account of further developments in the field. This conception, coupled with the necessity of allowing adequate time for each volume to be prepared with the necessary care, means that there is no set time-table for the publication of the whole series. Each volume will be a self-contained work, complete in itself. The order in which the handbooks are published does not imply any rank ordering, but is determined by the way in which the series is organized; the editor of the whole series enlist a competent editor for each individual volume. Once the principal editor for a volume has been found, he or she then has a completely free hand in the choice of co-editors and contributors. The editors plan each volume independently of the others, being governed only by general formal principles. The series editor only intervene where questions of delineation between individual volumes are concerned. It is felt that this (modus operandi) is best suited to achieving the objectives of the series, namely to give a competent account of the present state of knowledge and of the perception of the problems in the area covered by each volume.
  • Englisch
  • |
  • Deutsch
  • Berlin/Boston
  • |
  • USA
  • Für Beruf und Forschung
  • |
  • US School Grade: College Graduate Student
XI, Seite 973-2000
  • 10,68 MB
978-3-11-019427-2 (9783110194272)
weitere Ausgaben werden ermittelt
1 - Inhalt / Contents [Seite 5]
2 - XIII. Semantische Kategorien und Operationen in der Morphologie I: Entitätsbegriffe / Semantic categories and operations in morphology I: Entity concepts [Seite 12]
2.1 - 94. Entity concepts [Seite 12]
2.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 12]
2.1.2 - 2. Four orders of entities [Seite 13]
2.1.3 - 3. The hypostatization of qualities [Seite 15]
2.1.4 - 4. Morphological signalling of orders of entities [Seite 16]
2.1.5 - 5. First-order entities [Seite 17]
2.1.6 - 6. Higher-order entities [Seite 19]
2.1.7 - 7. Hypostatized qualities [Seite 20]
2.1.8 - 8. Conclusion [Seite 20]
2.1.9 - 9. References [Seite 21]
2.2 - 95. Deixis and reference [Seite 22]
2.2.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 22]
2.2.2 - 2. The situation of speech [Seite 22]
2.2.3 - 3. Discourse roles [Seite 22]
2.2.4 - 4. Deictic dimensions [Seite 26]
2.2.5 - 5. Deictic domains [Seite 30]
2.2.6 - 6. Deictic morphological structures [Seite 32]
2.2.7 - 7. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 33]
2.2.8 - 8. References [Seite 33]
2.3 - 96. Person [Seite 37]
2.3.1 - 1. Fundamentals [Seite 37]
2.3.2 - 2. Representation in language structure [Seite 41]
2.3.3 - 3. Person categories in detail [Seite 42]
2.3.4 - 4. Interactions with other categories [Seite 46]
2.3.5 - 5. Geographical distributions [Seite 51]
2.3.6 - 6. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 52]
2.3.7 - 7. References [Seite 52]
2.4 - 97. Classifiers [Seite 55]
2.4.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 55]
2.4.2 - 2. Semantic categorization [Seite 55]
2.4.3 - 3. A morphosyntactic typology [Seite 57]
2.4.4 - 4. Dynamic dimension of classifier systems [Seite 65]
2.4.5 - 5. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 68]
2.4.6 - 6. References [Seite 68]
2.5 - 98. Gender and noun class [Seite 70]
2.5.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 70]
2.5.2 - 2. Formal properties of gender systems [Seite 71]
2.5.3 - 3. Principles of gender assignment [Seite 73]
2.5.4 - 4. Semantics of genders [Seite 76]
2.5.5 - 5. Gender agreement and gender resolution [Seite 76]
2.5.6 - 6. Interrelation with other grammatical categories [Seite 79]
2.5.7 - 7. Diachronic dimensions of gender [Seite 81]
2.5.8 - 8. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 82]
2.5.9 - 9. References [Seite 82]
2.6 - 99. Diminution and augmentation [Seite 84]
2.6.1 - 1. Terms and definitions [Seite 84]
2.6.2 - 2. Formal aspects [Seite 84]
2.6.3 - 3. Semantic aspects [Seite 87]
2.6.4 - 4. Contextual aspects [Seite 88]
2.6.5 - 5. Etymological aspects [Seite 90]
2.6.6 - 6. References [Seite 90]
2.7 - 100. Numerus [Seite 92]
2.7.1 - 1. Einleitung [Seite 92]
2.7.2 - 2. Numeruskategorien [Seite 93]
2.7.3 - 3. Numerusfähige Elemente [Seite 97]
2.7.4 - 4. Art der Kodierung [Seite 100]
2.7.5 - 5. Locus der Kodierung [Seite 102]
2.7.6 - 6. Evolution der Numerusmorphologie [Seite 103]
2.7.7 - 7. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 104]
2.7.8 - 8. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 104]
2.8 - 101. Mass and collection [Seite 106]
2.8.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 106]
2.8.2 - 2. Semantics of mass nouns [Seite 107]
2.8.3 - 3. Morphological categories on mass nouns [Seite 107]
2.8.4 - 4. Is the count-mass distinction a linguistic universal? [Seite 109]
2.8.5 - 5. Collections and collectives [Seite 110]
2.8.6 - 6. Operations relating collectives and collections, mass and individuals [Seite 110]
2.8.7 - 7. References [Seite 111]
2.9 - 102. Case [Seite 112]
2.9.1 - 1. A case system [Seite 112]
2.9.2 - 2. Problems of description [Seite 113]
2.9.3 - 3. Realisation [Seite 116]
2.9.4 - 4. Survey of case marking [Seite 119]
2.9.5 - 5. Diachrony of case [Seite 125]
2.9.6 - 6. References [Seite 127]
2.10 - 103. Possession [Seite 130]
2.10.1 - 1. Definition und Abgrenzung [Seite 130]
2.10.2 - 2. Prädikative Possession = Etablierung [Seite 130]
2.10.3 - 3. Attributive Konstruktionen [Seite 132]
2.10.4 - 4. Inhärenz der Possessiv-Relation [Seite 136]
2.10.5 - 5. Nominaler vs. pronominaler Possessor [Seite 138]
2.10.6 - 6. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 140]
2.10.7 - 7. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 140]
3 - XIV. Semantische Kategorien und Operationen in der Morphologie II: Sachverhalts-, Eigenschafts- und verwandte Begriffe / Semantic categories and operations in morphology II: State-of-affairs, property and related concepts [Seite 143]
3.1 - 104. State-of-affairs concepts [Seite 143]
3.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 143]
3.1.2 - 2. States-of-affairs [Seite 143]
3.1.3 - 3. Predicates [Seite 145]
3.1.4 - 4. Aktionsart [Seite 148]
3.1.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 149]
3.1.6 - 6. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 149]
3.1.7 - 7. References [Seite 149]
3.2 - 105. Property concepts [Seite 150]
3.2.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 150]
3.2.2 - 2. Functions of property concept forms [Seite 151]
3.2.3 - 3. How languages express property concepts [Seite 151]
3.2.4 - 4. Characteristics of property concepts [Seite 154]
3.2.5 - 5. References [Seite 155]
3.3 - 106. Circumstance concepts [Seite 156]
3.3.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 156]
3.3.2 - 2. Types of circumstance concepts [Seite 159]
3.3.3 - 3. Head-marking expression of circumstantial meanings [Seite 161]
3.3.4 - 4. Dependent-marking expression of circumstance meanings [Seite 165]
3.3.5 - 5. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 168]
3.3.6 - 6. References [Seite 168]
3.4 - 107. Valency change [Seite 169]
3.4.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 169]
3.4.2 - 2. Valency-decreasing categories [Seite 170]
3.4.3 - 3. Valency-increasing categories [Seite 173]
3.4.4 - 4. General features of valency-changing morphology [Seite 178]
3.4.5 - 5. Diachronic sources of valency-changing morphology [Seite 180]
3.4.6 - 6. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 181]
3.4.7 - 7. References [Seite 181]
3.5 - 108. Voice [Seite 184]
3.5.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 184]
3.5.2 - 2. Definition: The active and the passive [Seite 185]
3.5.3 - 3. Voice as a family of constructions [Seite 186]
3.5.4 - 4. The middle [Seite 188]
3.5.5 - 5. Valency-increasing passives [Seite 189]
3.5.6 - 6. The inverse system [Seite 190]
3.5.7 - 7. Voice in ergative languages [Seite 191]
3.5.8 - 8. Voice in Philippine languages [Seite 192]
3.5.9 - 9. Two dimensions of voice [Seite 194]
3.5.10 - 10. Voice morphology [Seite 196]
3.5.11 - 11. Concluding remarks [Seite 202]
3.5.12 - 12. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 202]
3.5.13 - 13. References [Seite 202]
3.6 - 109. Aspect and Aktionsart [Seite 204]
3.6.1 - 1. Aspectuality [Seite 204]
3.6.2 - 2. Aspect versus Aktionsart [Seite 204]
3.6.3 - 3. Aktionsart [Seite 206]
3.6.4 - 4. Aspect [Seite 212]
3.6.5 - 5. Interaction of aspect and Aktionsart [Seite 217]
3.6.6 - 6. References [Seite 218]
3.7 - 110. Tense [Seite 219]
3.7.1 - 1. General [Seite 219]
3.7.2 - 2. The notion of "tense" and its relation to "mood" and "aspect" [Seite 220]
3.7.3 - 3. Formal models of the semantics of tense [Seite 220]
3.7.4 - 4. Past, present, and future [Seite 221]
3.7.5 - 5. Past time reference and past tense [Seite 221]
3.7.6 - 6. Future time reference and future tense [Seite 223]
3.7.7 - 7. Present tenses [Seite 224]
3.7.8 - 8. Perfect [Seite 224]
3.7.9 - 9. Past and future perfects [Seite 225]
3.7.10 - 10. Experiential [Seite 226]
3.7.11 - 11. Narrative [Seite 226]
3.7.12 - 12. Remoteness [Seite 226]
3.7.13 - 13. Tense and subordination [Seite 227]
3.7.14 - 14. Interaction between tense, negation, and expectation markings [Seite 228]
3.7.15 - 15. References [Seite 228]
3.8 - 111. Illocution, mood, and modality [Seite 229]
3.8.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 229]
3.8.2 - 2. Illocution [Seite 229]
3.8.3 - 3. Modality [Seite 231]
3.8.4 - 4. Mood [Seite 237]
3.8.5 - 5. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 239]
3.8.6 - 6. References [Seite 239]
3.9 - 112. Interclausal relations [Seite 241]
3.9.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 241]
3.9.2 - 2. Temporal relations [Seite 241]
3.9.3 - 3. Switch-reference [Seite 242]
3.9.4 - 4. Conditional [Seite 243]
3.9.5 - 5. Cause/reason [Seite 244]
3.9.6 - 6. Purpose [Seite 244]
3.9.7 - 7. References [Seite 245]
3.10 - 113. Negation [Seite 246]
3.10.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 246]
3.10.2 - 2. Morphological representation [Seite 247]
3.10.3 - 3. Morphemic distinctions [Seite 248]
3.10.4 - 4. Affirmative-negative contrast [Seite 249]
3.10.5 - 5. As a modal concept [Seite 250]
3.10.6 - 6. References [Seite 250]
3.11 - 114. Comparison and gradation [Seite 251]
3.11.1 - 1. Preliminary notions [Seite 251]
3.11.2 - 2. Comparative [Seite 253]
3.11.3 - 3. Superlative [Seite 256]
3.11.4 - 4. Equative [Seite 257]
3.11.5 - 5. References [Seite 258]
4 - XV. Morphologische Typologie und Universalien / Morphological typology and universals [Seite 260]
4.1 - 115. Approaches to morphological typology [Seite 260]
4.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 260]
4.1.2 - 2. Language and thought [Seite 260]
4.1.3 - 3. The notion 'morphological type' [Seite 263]
4.1.4 - 4. Morphemes and categories [Seite 264]
4.1.5 - 5. Head-marked vs. dependent-marked structure [Seite 266]
4.1.6 - 6. Typology and evolution [Seite 266]
4.1.7 - 7. References [Seite 269]
4.2 - 116. Types of morphological structure [Seite 270]
4.2.1 - 1. General remarks [Seite 270]
4.2.2 - 2. The parts of speech [Seite 272]
4.2.3 - 3. Inflection and derivation [Seite 272]
4.2.4 - 4. References [Seite 273]
4.3 - 117. Quantitative Typologie [Seite 274]
4.3.1 - 1. Die quantitativen morphologischen Indizes von J. H. Greenberg [Seite 274]
4.3.2 - 2. Zur Weiterentwicklung des Greenbergschen Ansatzes [Seite 275]
4.3.3 - 3. Taxonomische morphologische Sprachklassifikation und Suche nach Zusammenhängen [Seite 280]
4.3.4 - 4. Quantifizierung der Eigenschaften grammatischer Subsysteme [Seite 283]
4.3.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 284]
4.4 - 118. Cross-linguistic generalizations and their explanation [Seite 286]
4.4.1 - 1. Classical morphological typology [Seite 286]
4.4.2 - 2. Cross-linguistic generalizations in morphology [Seite 287]
4.4.3 - 3. Explanations of cross-linguistic generalizations in morphology [Seite 289]
4.4.4 - 4. References [Seite 292]
5 - XVI. Systeme morphologischer Struktur: Sprachskizzen / Systems of morphological structure: Illustrative sketches [Seite 294]
5.1 - 119. English (Indo-European: Germanic) [Seite 294]
5.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 294]
5.1.2 - 2. Morphological operations [Seite 294]
5.1.3 - 3. Inflection [Seite 295]
5.1.4 - 4. Derivation [Seite 297]
5.1.5 - 5. Compounding [Seite 301]
5.1.6 - 6. Cliticization [Seite 303]
5.1.7 - 7. References [Seite 305]
5.2 - 120. Deutsch (Indogermanisch: Germanisch) [Seite 306]
5.2.1 - 1. Vorbemerkungen [Seite 306]
5.2.2 - 2. Die Flexion der Nomina [Seite 307]
5.2.3 - 3. Die Flexion der Verben [Seite 310]
5.2.4 - 4. Wortbildung [Seite 313]
5.2.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 317]
5.3 - 121. Francais (Indo-européen: Roman) [Seite 324]
5.3.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 324]
5.3.2 - 2. Types d'opérations de construction de mots: délimitation [Seite 324]
5.3.3 - 3. Opérations dérivationnelles de construction de mots:conditions d'application [Seite 327]
5.3.4 - 4. Structures et sens des mots dérivationnellement construits [Seite 330]
5.3.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 336]
5.3.6 - 6. Références [Seite 336]
5.4 - 122. Russisch (Indogermanisch: Slawisch) [Seite 339]
5.4.1 - 1. Allgemeines zur russischen Sprache [Seite 339]
5.4.2 - 2. Der morphologische Grundcharakter des Russischen [Seite 339]
5.4.3 - 3. Die Wortarten als morphologisch ausgewiesene Größen [Seite 340]
5.4.4 - 4. Grammatische Morphologie [Seite 341]
5.4.5 - 5. Wortbildungsmorphologie [Seite 346]
5.4.6 - 6. Grammatische Morphologie und Wortbildung in der Literatur [Seite 347]
5.4.7 - 7. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 348]
5.5 - 123. Altgriechisch (Indogermanisch) [Seite 349]
5.5.1 - 1. Einleitung [Seite 349]
5.5.2 - 2. Der morphologische Typ des Altgriechischen [Seite 350]
5.5.3 - 3. Wortarten [Seite 351]
5.5.4 - 4. Flexivisch ausgedrückte Kategorien des Nomens und Verbs [Seite 355]
5.5.5 - 5. Morphologische Prozesse [Seite 358]
5.5.6 - 6. Flexion des Nomens [Seite 359]
5.5.7 - 7. Verbalflexion [Seite 361]
5.5.8 - 8. Wortbildung [Seite 364]
5.5.9 - 9. Illustrativer Text [Seite 365]
5.5.10 - 10. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 365]
5.5.11 - 11. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 365]
5.6 - 124. Finnish (Finno-Ugric) [Seite 367]
5.6.1 - 1. Background [Seite 367]
5.6.2 - 2. General characteristics of Finnish word structure [Seite 367]
5.6.3 - 3. Parts of speech [Seite 368]
5.6.4 - 4. Morphotactic structure and basic inflectional categories of nominals [Seite 370]
5.6.5 - 5. Morphotactic structure and basic inflectional categories of finite verb-forms [Seite 373]
5.6.6 - 6. Morphotactic structure and basic inflectional categories of nonfinite verb-forms [Seite 375]
5.6.7 - 7. Clitics [Seite 376]
5.6.8 - 8. Morphophonological alternations [Seite 376]
5.6.9 - 9. Nominal inflectional types [Seite 377]
5.6.10 - 10. Verbal inflectional types [Seite 378]
5.6.11 - 11. Derivational morphology [Seite 378]
5.6.12 - 12. Compounding [Seite 379]
5.6.13 - 13. Morphological productivity and diachronic tendencies in the morphological system [Seite 379]
5.6.14 - 14. Processing and acquisition of Finnish morphology [Seite 380]
5.6.15 - 15. Illustrative text [Seite 380]
5.6.16 - 16. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 381]
5.6.17 - 17. References [Seite 381]
5.7 - 125. Hebrew (Semitic) [Seite 382]
5.7.1 - 1. The Hebrew language [Seite 382]
5.7.2 - 2. The Hebrew binyan system [Seite 382]
5.7.3 - 3. The sign-oriented approach [Seite 385]
5.7.4 - 4. The traditional approach [Seite 385]
5.7.5 - 5. The analysis [Seite 388]
5.7.6 - 6. The data [Seite 392]
5.7.7 - 7. Summary and conclusions [Seite 394]
5.7.8 - 8. Illustrative text [Seite 395]
5.7.9 - 9. References [Seite 395]
5.8 - 126. Türkisch (Turk) [Seite 397]
5.8.1 - 1. Allgemeine Informationen [Seite 397]
5.8.2 - 2. Agglutination und Allomorphie [Seite 397]
5.8.3 - 3. Nominalflexion [Seite 398]
5.8.4 - 4. Verbalmorphologie [Seite 400]
5.8.5 - 5. Wortbildung [Seite 404]
5.8.6 - 6. Illustrativer Text [Seite 405]
5.8.7 - 7. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 405]
5.8.8 - 8. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 405]
5.9 - 127. Hunzib (North-East Caucasian) [Seite 406]
5.9.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 406]
5.9.2 - 2. Nouns [Seite 406]
5.9.3 - 3. Adjectives and pronouns [Seite 408]
5.9.4 - 4. Verbs [Seite 409]
5.9.5 - 5. Illustrative Text [Seite 413]
5.9.6 - 6. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 414]
5.9.7 - 7. References [Seite 414]
5.10 - 128. Ketisch (Jenisseisch) [Seite 415]
5.10.1 - 1. Allgemeine Information [Seite 415]
5.10.2 - 2. Zur Phonologie [Seite 415]
5.10.3 - 3. Allgemeines zur morphologischen Typologie [Seite 415]
5.10.4 - 4. Das Verb [Seite 416]
5.10.5 - 5. Das Substantiv [Seite 421]
5.10.6 - 6. Das Pronomen [Seite 423]
5.10.7 - 7. Andere Wortarten [Seite 424]
5.10.8 - 8. Zur Wortbildung [Seite 425]
5.10.9 - 9. Illustrativer Text [Seite 425]
5.10.10 - 10. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 427]
5.10.11 - 11. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 427]
5.11 - 129. West Greenlandic (Eskimo) [Seite 428]
5.11.1 - 1. The language and its speakers [Seite 428]
5.11.2 - 2. Major categories and processes [Seite 428]
5.11.3 - 3. Morphophonology [Seite 429]
5.11.4 - 4. Nominal inflection [Seite 430]
5.11.5 - 5. Verbal inflection [Seite 431]
5.11.6 - 6. Derivational morphology [Seite 432]
5.11.7 - 7. Enclitics [Seite 435]
5.11.8 - 8. Illustrative text [Seite 436]
5.11.9 - 9. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 437]
5.11.10 - 10. References [Seite 437]
5.12 - 130. Koyukon (Athapaskan) [Seite 438]
5.12.1 - 1. The language and its speakers [Seite 438]
5.12.2 - 2. Major categories and processes [Seite 439]
5.12.3 - 3. The structure of the verbal expression [Seite 439]
5.12.4 - 4. Nominal expressions [Seite 447]
5.12.5 - 5. Directionals [Seite 448]
5.12.6 - 6. Illustrative text [Seite 448]
5.12.7 - 7. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 450]
5.12.8 - 8. References [Seite 450]
5.13 - 131. Montagnais/Innu-aimun (Algonquian) [Seite 450]
5.13.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 450]
5.13.2 - 2. Montagnais lexical classes [Seite 451]
5.13.3 - 3. Semantic categories encoded by Montagnais morphology [Seite 451]
5.13.4 - 4. Formal processes [Seite 454]
5.13.5 - 5. Inflection [Seite 454]
5.13.6 - 6. Word formation [Seite 455]
5.13.7 - 7. Conclusion [Seite 457]
5.13.8 - 8. Illustrative text [Seite 458]
5.13.9 - 9. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 458]
5.13.10 - 10. References [Seite 459]
5.14 - 132. Guaraní (Tupi-Guaraní) [Seite 460]
5.14.1 - 1. Preliminaries [Seite 460]
5.14.2 - 2. Inflectional morphology [Seite 462]
5.14.3 - 3. Derivational morphology [Seite 465]
5.14.4 - 4. Word classes [Seite 467]
5.14.5 - 5. Illustrative text [Seite 469]
5.14.6 - 6. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 471]
5.14.7 - 7. References [Seite 471]
5.15 - 133. Nahuatl (Uto-Aztecan) [Seite 472]
5.15.1 - 1. The Nahuatl language [Seite 472]
5.15.2 - 2. Word classes and the 'omnipredicative' parameter [Seite 472]
5.15.3 - 3. Verb morphology [Seite 475]
5.15.4 - 4. Noun morphology [Seite 480]
5.15.5 - 5. Locative morphology [Seite 484]
5.15.6 - 6. Derivation [Seite 485]
5.15.7 - 7. Composition [Seite 489]
5.15.8 - 8. Illustrative text [Seite 491]
5.15.9 - 9. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 491]
5.15.10 - 10. References [Seite 491]
5.16 - 134. Quechua (Quechua) [Seite 492]
5.16.1 - 1. General facts on Quechua [Seite 492]
5.16.2 - 2. Typological features [Seite 493]
5.16.3 - 3. Word-classes [Seite 495]
5.16.4 - 4. Personal reference [Seite 495]
5.16.5 - 5. Pluralization [Seite 496]
5.16.6 - 6. Tense and mood [Seite 497]
5.16.7 - 7. Nominalization [Seite 497]
5.16.8 - 8. Subordination [Seite 498]
5.16.9 - 9. Other verbal affixes [Seite 498]
5.16.10 - 10. Case and other nominal affixes [Seite 499]
5.16.11 - 11. Independent suffixes [Seite 500]
5.16.12 - 12. Contact phenomena [Seite 500]
5.16.13 - 13. Illustrative texts [Seite 501]
5.16.14 - 14. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 502]
5.16.15 - 15. References [Seite 502]
5.17 - 135. Yagua (Peba-Yaguan) [Seite 503]
5.17.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 503]
5.17.2 - 2. Morphological typology [Seite 504]
5.17.3 - 3. Word classes [Seite 504]
5.17.4 - 4. Morphology of nouns [Seite 505]
5.17.5 - 5. Morphology of verbs [Seite 506]
5.17.6 - 6. Illustrative text [Seite 510]
5.17.7 - 7. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 511]
5.17.8 - 8. References [Seite 511]
5.18 - 136. Tagalog (Austronesian) [Seite 513]
5.18.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 513]
5.18.2 - 2. Morphosyntax and parts of speech [Seite 514]
5.18.3 - 3. Formal processes [Seite 516]
5.18.4 - 4. Voice, aspect, and mood [Seite 519]
5.18.5 - 5. Actor involvement [Seite 523]
5.18.6 - 6. Illustrative text [Seite 526]
5.18.7 - 7. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 528]
5.18.8 - 8. References [Seite 528]
5.19 - 137. Diyari (Pama-Nyungan) [Seite 530]
5.19.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 530]
5.19.2 - 2. Morphological type [Seite 531]
5.19.3 - 3. Parts of speech [Seite 532]
5.19.4 - 4. Nominal morphology [Seite 532]
5.19.5 - 5. Pronoun morphology [Seite 535]
5.19.6 - 6. Verb morphology [Seite 535]
5.19.7 - 7. Predicate determiner morphology [Seite 538]
5.19.8 - 8. Particles [Seite 538]
5.19.9 - 9. Post-inflectional morphology [Seite 538]
5.19.10 - 10. Illustrative text [Seite 538]
5.19.11 - 11. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 540]
5.19.12 - 12. References [Seite 540]
5.20 - 138. Wambon (Awyu) [Seite 541]
5.20.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 541]
5.20.2 - 2. Verbs [Seite 541]
5.20.3 - 3. Nouns [Seite 543]
5.20.4 - 4. Pronouns [Seite 543]
5.20.5 - 5. Adjectives [Seite 543]
5.20.6 - 6. Demonstratives [Seite 543]
5.20.7 - 7. Numerals [Seite 544]
5.20.8 - 8. Adverbs [Seite 544]
5.20.9 - 9. Nominal case suffixes [Seite 544]
5.20.10 - 10. Connectives [Seite 545]
5.20.11 - 11. Concluding remarks [Seite 545]
5.20.12 - 12. Illustrative text [Seite 545]
5.20.13 - 13. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 546]
5.20.14 - 14. References [Seite 546]
5.21 - 139. Turkana (Nilotic) [Seite 547]
5.21.1 - 1. The verb [Seite 547]
5.21.2 - 2. The noun and other categories [Seite 549]
5.21.3 - 3. Category shift [Seite 550]
5.21.4 - 4. The morphology-phonology interface [Seite 552]
5.21.5 - 5. The morphology-syntax interface [Seite 554]
5.21.6 - 6. Illustrative text [Seite 555]
5.21.7 - 7. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 556]
5.21.8 - 8. References [Seite 556]
5.22 - 140. Twi (Kwa) [Seite 557]
5.22.1 - 1. Sprachgebiet, Forschungsstand und soziolinguistische Angaben [Seite 557]
5.22.2 - 2. Typologischer Charakter [Seite 558]
5.22.3 - 3. Silben- und Morphemstruktur [Seite 558]
5.22.4 - 4. Wortarten [Seite 558]
5.22.5 - 5. Wortbildung [Seite 564]
5.22.6 - 6. Illustrativer Text [Seite 565]
5.22.7 - 7. Unübliche Abkürzungen [Seite 566]
5.22.8 - 8. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 566]
5.23 - 141. Kinyarwanda (Bantu) [Seite 567]
5.23.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 567]
5.23.2 - 2. Noun [Seite 568]
5.23.3 - 3. Verb [Seite 572]
5.23.4 - 4. Adjective [Seite 577]
5.23.5 - 5. Unclassified categories [Seite 577]
5.23.6 - 6. Tones [Seite 578]
5.23.7 - 7. Reduplication [Seite 580]
5.23.8 - 8. Problems in Kinyarwanda morphology [Seite 581]
5.23.9 - 9. Illustrative text [Seite 582]
5.23.10 - 10. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 584]
5.23.11 - 11. References [Seite 584]
5.24 - 142. Vietnamesisch (Viet-Muong) [Seite 585]
5.24.1 - 1. Allgemeine Angaben [Seite 585]
5.24.2 - 2. Abgeleitetes Wort [Seite 586]
5.24.3 - 3. Zusammengesetztes Wort [Seite 587]
5.24.4 - 4. Reduplikation [Seite 589]
5.24.5 - 5. Iteration [Seite 590]
5.24.6 - 6. Von der syntaktischen Fügung zum Wort [Seite 591]
5.24.7 - 7. Wortklassen [Seite 592]
5.24.8 - 8. Illustrativer Text [Seite 592]
5.24.9 - 9. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 593]
5.25 - 143. Deutsche Gebärdensprache [Seite 594]
5.25.1 - 1. Einleitung [Seite 594]
5.25.2 - 2. Problem der Entwicklung von Beschreibungskategorien [Seite 595]
5.25.3 - 3. Aspekte der Morphologie in Gebärdensprachen [Seite 596]
5.25.4 - 4. Modell der Morphologie der Bewegungsverben [Seite 597]
5.25.5 - 5. Serialverb-Konstruktionen [Seite 598]
5.25.6 - 6. Gegenpositionen [Seite 599]
5.25.7 - 7. Weiterentwicklung [Seite 600]
5.25.8 - 8. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 601]
5.26 - 144. Plansprachen [Seite 603]
5.26.1 - 1. Zum Begriff "Plansprache" [Seite 603]
5.26.2 - 2. Volapük, Esperanto und Interlingua [Seite 603]
5.26.3 - 3. Herkunft der Morpheme [Seite 604]
5.26.4 - 4. Wortbildung [Seite 605]
5.26.5 - 5. Grammatische Kategorien und Paradigmen [Seite 608]
5.26.6 - 6. Linguistische Bedeutung [Seite 610]
5.26.7 - 7. Illustrative Texte [Seite 611]
5.26.8 - 8. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 611]
6 - XVII. Morphologischer Wandel I: Theoretische Probleme / Morphological change I: Fundamental issues [Seite 614]
6.1 - 145. Fundamental concepts [Seite 614]
6.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 614]
6.1.2 - 2. Processes of language acquisition and language use [Seite 614]
6.1.3 - 3. Morphological change proper [Seite 617]
6.1.4 - 4. Morphologization [Seite 622]
6.1.5 - 5. Morphological changes due to extragrammatical forces [Seite 625]
6.1.6 - 6. Morphology and contact-induced change [Seite 626]
6.1.7 - 7. Conclusions [Seite 627]
6.1.8 - 8. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 628]
6.1.9 - 9. References [Seite 629]
6.2 - 146. Grammaticalization: from syntax to morphology [Seite 630]
6.2.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 630]
6.2.2 - 2. An overview of grammaticalization [Seite 632]
6.2.3 - 3. The process of grammaticalization [Seite 636]
6.2.4 - 4. Uncommon abbreviations [Seite 638]
6.2.5 - 5. References [Seite 638]
6.3 - 147. Morphologisierung: von der Phonologie zur Morphologie [Seite 640]
6.3.1 - 1. Was ist Morphologisierung? [Seite 640]
6.3.2 - 2. Zur Geschichte des Konzepts [Seite 641]
6.3.3 - 3. Parameter der Morphologisierung [Seite 643]
6.3.4 - 4. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 650]
6.4 - 148. Analogical change [Seite 651]
6.4.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 651]
6.4.2 - 2. Definition and exemplification [Seite 651]
6.4.3 - 3. Previous analyses [Seite 652]
6.4.4 - 4. Optimality Theory [Seite 653]
6.4.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 654]
6.4.6 - 6. References [Seite 654]
6.5 - 149. Remotivation and reinterpretation [Seite 655]
6.5.1 - 1. Characterization of the phenomena and definition of terms [Seite 655]
6.5.2 - 2. Subclassifications and typical examples [Seite 656]
6.5.3 - 3. Causes and hindering factors of secondary motivation [Seite 659]
6.5.4 - 4. Effects of secondary motivation [Seite 660]
6.5.5 - 5. Different approaches to secondary motivation [Seite 661]
6.5.6 - 6. References [Seite 663]
6.6 - 150. Lexicalization and demotivation [Seite 665]
6.6.1 - 1. Terminology [Seite 665]
6.6.2 - 2. Lexicalization [Seite 667]
6.6.3 - 3. Demotivation [Seite 673]
6.6.4 - 4. References [Seite 675]
6.7 - 151. Change in productivity [Seite 676]
6.7.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 676]
6.7.2 - 2. Types of changes in productivity [Seite 676]
6.7.3 - 3. Synchronic vs. diachronic productivity [Seite 678]
6.7.4 - 4. Linguistic factors affecting the productivity of bases [Seite 679]
6.7.5 - 5. References [Seite 683]
6.8 - 152. Morphologische Entlehnung und Lehnübersetzung [Seite 684]
6.8.1 - 1. Zum Gegenstandsbereich [Seite 684]
6.8.2 - 2. Die außersprachlichen Bedingungen für Interferenz [Seite 685]
6.8.3 - 3. Grundtypen der Interferenz [Seite 686]
6.8.4 - 4. Gliederung der Phänomene [Seite 687]
6.8.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 691]
6.9 - 153. Pidginization, creolization, and language death [Seite 693]
6.9.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 693]
6.9.2 - 2. Reduction processes: pidginization and language death [Seite 693]
6.9.3 - 3. Expansion processes: creolization [Seite 696]
6.9.4 - 4. References [Seite 700]
6.10 - 154. Morphological reconstruction [Seite 701]
6.10.1 - 1. Introduction: basic questions and methods [Seite 701]
6.10.2 - 2. Reconstruction: The first steps [Seite 702]
6.10.3 - 3. Further guiding principles [Seite 703]
6.10.4 - 4. Going beyond simple reconstruction of forms [Seite 705]
6.10.5 - 5. Pushing the limits: reconstructed states as real languages [Seite 706]
6.10.6 - 6. Conclusion [Seite 707]
6.10.7 - 7. References [Seite 707]
7 - XVIII. Morphologischer Wandel II: Fallstudien / Morphological change II: Case studies [Seite 708]
7.1 - 155. From Old English to Modern English [Seite 708]
7.1.1 - 1. Introductory remarks [Seite 708]
7.1.2 - 2. Inflection [Seite 708]
7.1.3 - 3. Word-formation [Seite 714]
7.1.4 - 4. References [Seite 719]
7.2 - 156. Vom Althochdeutschen zum Neuhochdeutschen [Seite 720]
7.2.1 - 1. Periodisierung der deutschen Sprachgeschichte [Seite 720]
7.2.2 - 2. Synchrone Heterogenität und historische Homogenität [Seite 721]
7.2.3 - 3. Forschungsgeschichte [Seite 722]
7.2.4 - 4. Entwicklungsgeschichtliche Grundzüge [Seite 724]
7.2.5 - 5. Flexion [Seite 726]
7.2.6 - 6. Wortbildung [Seite 733]
7.2.7 - 7. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 735]
7.3 - 157. From Latin to French [Seite 738]
7.3.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 738]
7.3.2 - 2. Inflection [Seite 738]
7.3.3 - 3. Word-formation [Seite 744]
7.3.4 - 4. References [Seite 750]
7.4 - 158. From Vedic to modern Indic languages [Seite 752]
7.4.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 752]
7.4.2 - 2. Old Indo-Aryan [Seite 752]
7.4.3 - 3. Middle Indo-Aryan [Seite 759]
7.4.4 - 4. New Indo-Aryan [Seite 763]
7.4.5 - 5. Transliteration and transcription [Seite 769]
7.4.6 - 6. References [Seite 769]
7.5 - 159. From Archaic Chinese to Mandarin [Seite 770]
7.5.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 770]
7.5.2 - 2. Affixation in Old Chinese [Seite 771]
7.5.3 - 3. Prosodic alternation - Type Aand B syllables [Seite 775]
7.5.4 - 4. Syllabic prefixes and suffixes in Old Chinese [Seite 775]
7.5.5 - 5. Reduplication [Seite 775]
7.5.6 - 6. Compounding [Seite 776]
7.5.7 - 7. New flectional suffixes [Seite 776]
7.5.8 - 8. New derivational affixes [Seite 777]
7.5.9 - 9. References [Seite 778]
7.6 - 160. From Classical Arabic to the modern Arabic vernaculars [Seite 780]
7.6.1 - 1. History of the Arabic language [Seite 780]
7.6.2 - 2. Morphology of the verb [Seite 782]
7.6.3 - 3. Morphology of the noun [Seite 787]
7.6.4 - 4. Demonstratives and interrogatives [Seite 791]
7.6.5 - 5. Pidginization and creolization in Arabic [Seite 792]
7.6.6 - 6. References [Seite 793]
7.7 - 161. Tok Pisin [Seite 795]
7.7.1 - 1. Pidgins and development [Seite 795]
7.7.2 - 2. Historical background [Seite 795]
7.7.3 - 3. History of research [Seite 796]
7.7.4 - 4. Documentation [Seite 796]
7.7.5 - 5. Internal history of Tok Pisin word formation [Seite 796]
7.7.6 - 6. Theoretical consequences [Seite 803]
7.7.7 - 7. References [Seite 805]
8 - XIX. Psycholinguistische Perspektiven / Psycholinguistic perspectives [Seite 806]
8.1 - 162. Mentale Repräsentation morphologischer Strukturen [Seite 806]
8.1.1 - 1. Mentale Repräsentationen [Seite 806]
8.1.2 - 2. Das mentale Lexikon und das Lexikon der Grammatik [Seite 807]
8.1.3 - 3. Beobachtungsbereiche und Forschungsmethoden [Seite 808]
8.1.4 - 4. Einige Grundprobleme der Forschung [Seite 811]
8.1.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 815]
8.2 - 163. Speech production and perception [Seite 818]
8.2.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 818]
8.2.2 - 2. Processing models [Seite 818]
8.2.3 - 3. History of the question [Seite 819]
8.2.4 - 4. Important variables [Seite 819]
8.2.5 - 5. Sources of evidence [Seite 821]
8.2.6 - 6. Results of empirical studies [Seite 822]
8.2.7 - 7. Conclusion [Seite 825]
8.2.8 - 8. References [Seite 826]
8.3 - 164. Speech errors [Seite 828]
8.3.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 828]
8.3.2 - 2. Speech errors and linguistic theory [Seite 829]
8.3.3 - 3. The structure of the lexicon [Seite 830]
8.3.4 - 4. Rules and accommodations [Seite 832]
8.3.5 - 5. Conclusion [Seite 833]
8.3.6 - 6. References [Seite 833]
8.4 - 165. First language acquisition [Seite 835]
8.4.1 - 1. Acquiring morphology [Seite 835]
8.4.2 - 2. Inflection [Seite 836]
8.4.3 - 3. Derivation [Seite 841]
8.4.4 - 4. Summary [Seite 843]
8.4.5 - 5. References [Seite 843]
8.5 - 166. Second language acquisition [Seite 846]
8.5.1 - 1. Morpheme-acquisition order [Seite 846]
8.5.2 - 2. Inherent inflectional morphology [Seite 846]
8.5.3 - 3. Contextual inflection [Seite 849]
8.5.4 - 4. Case marking [Seite 851]
8.5.5 - 5. Derivation [Seite 852]
8.5.6 - 6. Compounding [Seite 853]
8.5.7 - 7. References [Seite 854]
8.6 - 167. Sprachstörungen [Seite 856]
8.6.1 - 1. Einleitung [Seite 856]
8.6.2 - 2. Aphasie [Seite 857]
8.6.3 - 3. Sprachentwicklungsauffälligkeiten [Seite 860]
8.6.4 - 4. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 863]
9 - XX. Morphologie in der Praxis / Morphology in practice [Seite 869]
9.1 - 168. Field work [Seite 869]
9.1.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 869]
9.1.2 - 2. Getting to the language [Seite 869]
9.1.3 - 3. Collecting the data [Seite 870]
9.1.4 - 4. Identifying the meaning [Seite 871]
9.1.5 - 5. Resistant problems [Seite 871]
9.1.6 - 6. Technical helps [Seite 872]
9.1.7 - 7. References [Seite 873]
9.2 - 169. Interlinear morphemic glossing [Seite 874]
9.2.1 - 1. Basic concepts [Seite 874]
9.2.2 - 2. Prerequisites of morphological analysis [Seite 878]
9.2.3 - 3. Principles of interlinear glossing [Seite 879]
9.2.4 - 4. Boundary symbols [Seite 891]
9.2.5 - 5. Typographic conventions [Seite 894]
9.2.6 - 6. Summary [Seite 895]
9.2.7 - 7. References [Seite 897]
9.3 - 170. Grammaticography [Seite 897]
9.3.1 - 1. General problems [Seite 897]
9.3.2 - 2. Grammaticographic problems in morphology [Seite 904]
9.3.3 - 3. Structure of a grammar [Seite 909]
9.3.4 - 4. Descriptive devices [Seite 915]
9.3.5 - 5. References [Seite 921]
9.4 - 171. Lexicography [Seite 922]
9.4.1 - 1. Morphology in dictionaries [Seite 922]
9.4.2 - 2. Morphological models [Seite 926]
9.4.3 - 3. Morphology and lexicography [Seite 927]
9.4.4 - 4. References [Seite 931]
9.5 - 172. Computational linguistics [Seite 933]
9.5.1 - 1. Computational linguistics [Seite 933]
9.5.2 - 2. Models of morphology in computational linguistics [Seite 933]
9.5.3 - 3. Morphology in language technology [Seite 936]
9.5.4 - 4. Morphology learning [Seite 938]
9.5.5 - 5. Morphology tools for linguists [Seite 938]
9.5.6 - 6. References [Seite 939]
10 - XXI. Morphologie und Nachbardisziplinen / Morphology and related fields [Seite 941]
10.1 - 173. Namenkunde [Seite 941]
10.1.1 - 1. Eigennamen und ihre Funktionen [Seite 941]
10.1.2 - 2. Interne onymische Morphologie [Seite 942]
10.1.3 - 3. Externe onymische Morphologie [Seite 945]
10.1.4 - 4. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 949]
10.2 - 174. Etymologie [Seite 950]
10.2.1 - 1. Was ist Etymologie? [Seite 950]
10.2.2 - 2. Etymologie und Wortbildungslehre [Seite 951]
10.2.3 - 3. Etymologie und Wortgeschichte [Seite 952]
10.2.4 - 4. Die Wortprägung [Seite 952]
10.2.5 - 5. Theoretische Voraussetzungen [Seite 953]
10.2.6 - 6. Erschließungsmethoden [Seite 954]
10.2.7 - 7. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 955]
10.3 - 175. Schriftsysteme [Seite 955]
10.3.1 - 1. Sprachsystem und Schriftsystem [Seite 955]
10.3.2 - 2. Morphologische Aspekte in logographischen Schriftsystemen [Seite 956]
10.3.3 - 3. Morphologische Aspekte in phonographischen Schriftsystemen [Seite 957]
10.3.4 - 4. Zum Parameter der "Tiefe" [Seite 961]
10.3.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 962]
10.4 - 176. Terminology in special languages [Seite 964]
10.4.1 - 1. Introduction [Seite 964]
10.4.2 - 2. What are 'special languages'? [Seite 964]
10.4.3 - 3. The lexicon in special languages [Seite 964]
10.4.4 - 4. Term formation: morphological trends [Seite 965]
10.4.5 - 5. Standardisation in term formation [Seite 967]
10.4.6 - 6. Appendix [Seite 968]
10.4.7 - 7. References [Seite 968]
10.5 - 177. Sprachunterricht [Seite 969]
10.5.1 - 1. Eingrenzung des komplexen Themas [Seite 969]
10.5.2 - 2. Konzepte für das Lehren und Lernen einer Sprache [Seite 969]
10.5.3 - 3. Konzepte pädagogischer Grammatiken für denFremdsprachenunterricht [Seite 974]
10.5.4 - 4. Grammatik im muttersprachlichen Unterricht [Seite 975]
10.5.5 - 5. Zitierte Literatur [Seite 976]
11 - Verzeichnis der Abkürzungen / List of Abbreviations [Seite 977]
11.1 - 1. Deutsch [Seite 977]
11.2 - 2. English [Seite 978]
12 - Sprachenkarten / Language maps [Seite 981]
12.1 - 1. Afrika/Africa [Seite 981]
12.2 - 2. Australien/Australia [Seite 982]
12.3 - 3. Europa und Nahost/Europe and Near East [Seite 983]
12.4 - 4. Nordasien/North Asia [Seite 984]
12.5 - 5. Nordamerika/North America [Seite 985]
12.6 - 6. Südamerika/South America [Seite 986]
12.7 - 7. Südostasien/South East Asia [Seite 987]
13 - Namenregister / Index of names [Seite 988]
14 - Sprachenregister / Index of languages [Seite 1011]
15 - Sachregister / Index of subjects [Seite 1024]

Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen-DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Mit Wasserzeichen-DRM wird hier ein "weicher" Kopierschutz verwendet. Daher ist technisch zwar alles möglich - sogar eine unzulässige Weitergabe. Aber an sichtbaren und unsichtbaren Stellen wird der Käufer des E-Books als Wasserzeichen hinterlegt, sodass im Falle eines Missbrauchs die Spur zurückverfolgt werden kann.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Dateiformat: PDF
Kopierschutz: ohne DRM (Digital Rights Management)

Systemvoraussetzungen:

Computer (Windows; MacOS X; Linux): Verwenden Sie zum Lesen die kostenlose Software Adobe Reader, Adobe Digital Editions oder einen anderen PDF-Viewer Ihrer Wahl (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

Tablet/Smartphone (Android; iOS): Installieren Sie die kostenlose App Adobe Digital Editions oder eine andere Lese-App für E-Books (siehe E-Book Hilfe).

E-Book-Reader: Bookeen, Kobo, Pocketbook, Sony, Tolino u.v.a.m. (nur bedingt: Kindle)

Das Dateiformat PDF zeigt auf jeder Hardware eine Buchseite stets identisch an. Daher ist eine PDF auch für ein komplexes Layout geeignet, wie es bei Lehr- und Fachbüchern verwendet wird (Bilder, Tabellen, Spalten, Fußnoten). Bei kleinen Displays von E-Readern oder Smartphones sind PDF leider eher nervig, weil zu viel Scrollen notwendig ist. Ein Kopierschutz bzw. Digital Rights Management wird bei diesem E-Book nicht eingesetzt.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer E-Book Hilfe.


Download (sofort verfügbar)

500,00 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF mit Wasserzeichen-DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen

500,00 €
inkl. 7% MwSt.
Download / Einzel-Lizenz
PDF ohne DRM
siehe Systemvoraussetzungen
E-Book bestellen